Will the 2020 Season Be Played This Year?

Will the 2020 Season Be Played This Year?

  • Yes - complete season with no interuptions

    Votes: 96 39.7%
  • Yes - but there will be games missed due to local Coronavirus issues

    Votes: 33 13.6%
  • Yes - season will start late but we will finish it playing fewer games than normal

    Votes: 27 11.2%
  • No - season will start but get interrupted and cancelled

    Votes: 33 13.6%
  • No - season will be completely cancelled

    Votes: 51 21.1%
  • Other - post below

    Votes: 2 0.8%

  • Total voters
    242

Harrycrane

Well-known member
This is one example of a long list of repercussions to not having extracurricular activities that those making the decision will ignore. From the moment they decided to shut down the country in response to covid19 there has been a single minded focus on the virus to the exclusion of every other factor.

I'm not as confident as you that we'll have football or any extracurricular activities this fall. My reasoning is that the bureaucrats in charge know that the safest path forward for THEM is to cancel. That's a powerful incentive not to reopen.

I truly believe that given what we know today and considering ALL the factors impacting whether to close back down or to keep reopening that the path leading to the least damage is to reopen as much as possible. But considering the current MSM meltdown that's unlikely to happen.
So the media is to blame for any decision that elected officials make? I agreed that it is much more safe and ultimately beneficial for THEM to choose shutting everything down. Politicians are nothing if not for self preservation FIRST , because they feel that the most important thing is for the people to have THEM in power and if they made a decision that may endanger that , it would hurt the PEOPLE . Ego is a huge part of that and of course just wanting to keep their job as well . The fact that things from a national perspective don't look better than they do now is disheartening and may ultimately be a huge blow to school openings fully and of course important activities { Sports , clubs , music art, drama etc. } Blaming the media for everything is a reflex. It's done to deflect from some sort of truth you don't want to look at or have others look at.

Anyone with school aged kids can see up close the effect that this is having . I do believe it was necessary initially but at the very least I hope for at least 50 -50 in school and on line education. As for sports and other activities that most of us here in these spaces love ? It's difficult. Socially distancing for fans and limited tickets is very doable , BUT that's only part of the equation . I sincerely hope that the kids get to play some kind of schedule even if a bit limited and in front of less people . My initial thought was Spring or nothing. Unfortunately that may be reality . I still see no reason that IF things are better in Spring that there can't be some kind of season .
 

Jaws31

Well-known member
If you believe that teachers have an option to just up and quit, then online learning is also an option. It works both ways. Neither are what anyone WANTS.
Online learning is not an option. As I have said it was and is a failure. There is no reason teachers cannot be in the classroom with precautions in place. The rest of society is working why are teachers so fragile that they would be extra susceptible to this virus?
 

The Dock

Well-known member
Online learning is not an option. As I have said it was and is a failure. There is no reason teachers cannot be in the classroom with precautions in place. The rest of society is working why are teachers so fragile that they would be extra susceptible to this virus?
If your school, which you pay tuition for your kids to attend, managed to screw up online learning then that’s on your school.
 

Jake22

Member
The learning at the school he pays tuition for had full classes complete with lectures and REAL GRADES posted at the end. His school did a better job than my kid got at Kent State and my other kid received at a top area public school.

If your school, which you pay tuition for your kids to attend, managed to screw up online learning then that’s on your school.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
The learning at the school he pays tuition for had full classes complete with lectures and REAL GRADES posted at the end. His school did a better job than my kid got at Kent State and my other kid received at a top area public school.
Then why’s he dismissing online learning as a failure? It was only for ~2 months, at the tail of the school year, and was uncharted territory for everyone. The school his kids go to should be able to do online learning just fine, albeit not without a hiccup or two in the transition. In fact, if kids aren’t going back to classes full time then I can see every reason for kids to be enrolling into privates such as the one his kids go to - for reasons not the least of which include class size, principles and the belief in holding students accountable for actually doing their work and earning a grade.
 

Jake22

Member
Although they are good at it, online learning is not good for the kids. You can find that info anywhere. There are kids that are abused that’s not being caught, there are kids that school is their best meal. There are kids where the only normal part of their day is school. Online should only be a last option. There are many more bad effects for the kids not going to school that is beyond just learning. I have many friends that are teachers and they were FORCED to pass kids. That means most of those kids are already a year behind for a virus that shouldn’t keep them out of school. Now you want them to be 2 years behind? What if vaccine doesn’t work, 3years behind. Fortunately JFK kids won’t be behind, but most other school kids will be.


Then why’s he dismissing online learning as a failure? It was only for ~2 months, at the tail of the school year, and was uncharted territory for everyone. The school his kids go to should be able to do online learning just fine, albeit not without a hiccup or two in the transition. In fact, if kids aren’t going back to classes full time then I can see every reason for kids to be enrolling into privates such as the one his kids go to - for reasons not the least of which include class size, principles and the belief in holding students accountable for actually doing their work and earning a grade.
 

Jaws31

Well-known member
Unfortunately for you, it is not your decision to make. Right now everything is on the table. "Teacher's are fragile". Wow! You clearly know NOTHING about the profession. If you had/have children K-12, hopefully you home schooled so that you didn't have to deal with all the fragile teachers.
You haven't answer the question though. Why are teachers any different than the rest of society? What makes it so horribly dangerous to go to school and do their jobs when everyone else is fully capable to do so? I respect what teachers do and I argue that they are as essential as hospital workers and any other frontline workers but that means actually teaching, in person. The mere fact that you get so offended because I question why teachers can't do their jobs, with precautions, like everyone else in the workforce, kinda proves my point for me about "fragility". At least when it comes to yours. And FYI I have never had one iota of an issue with any of my kids teachers because they go to a great school where they aren't hoping for remote learning or blended learning or any other nonsense that keeps them home. Because lets face it, that's what this is all about. Stay home, get paid with no accountability and go on Yappi and say how much you wish there was school and Football.
 

Jaws31

Well-known member
If your school, which you pay tuition for your kids to attend, managed to screw up online learning then that’s on your school.
Online learning was actually as good as it could be at JFK. It was an absolute failure as a whole everywhere else. Most publics went to pass/fail only and no one failed. A local public had 375 of their 400 students on the honor roll the last 9 weeks, one of them was my sons friend who didn't turn in any work the last 5 weeks of the term. Online learning was and is a farce. Period.
 

Jaws31

Well-known member
Then why’s he dismissing online learning as a failure? It was only for ~2 months, at the tail of the school year, and was uncharted territory for everyone. The school his kids go to should be able to do online learning just fine, albeit not without a hiccup or two in the transition. In fact, if kids aren’t going back to classes full time then I can see every reason for kids to be enrolling into privates such as the one his kids go to - for reasons not the least of which include class size, principles and the belief in holding students accountable for actually doing their work and earning a grade.
Do you have kids currently in school? Im just curious. I have two still in school. One in Elementary and one in high school. As I said, Kennedy was fantastic but it was still difficult boardering on nearly impossible. Two working parents trying to help an Elementary student do homework and learn new material in 6 or 7 subjects, even with zoom meetings and emails and everything else is ridiculous. It was even harder for a high school student who is in AP and Honors classes. Zoom only goes so far. At one point he told me he was teaching himself physics. They both ended with great grades but imagine schools that dont have good support systems or homes with the same. I told the story on here somewhere of a local public math teacher that was told pass her students if they turned in their papers with any kind of work done on it. One student wrote "this is stupid" on every paper and she had to pass him because turned it in. True story. That is a failure of the kids. Online learning is failing the kids, even in the best situation like my kids have, its still failing them. They need to be in school.
 

GLAT

Inactive
1. My wife is a teacher at one of the top high schools in SW Ohio, according to state report card
2. She wants back in the classroom——not her choice
3. Remote learning required more work and hours compared to regular learning
4. Her district did not require students to be available during school hours, this will change if remote is needed in the fall
5. She could not fail anyone for the semester but could for the year
6. Her principals provided the following.....make your lesson interesting

One thing that remote learning has provided is how useless, in my opinion, principals can be.
I am working remotely and I see the same thing....middle management is basically pointless in this environment
 

270SC

Active member
Well maybe Americans need to wear a mask and follow orders, even Mike Pence said so today. If we think in 20+ days we will be ready to send kids back to school you need to lay off the acid. Ohio is in the Top 7 for case increase. Asking again, give me some reasons for why this would fall? If it wasn’t for the Marion Prison Debacle we would be breaking records right now. Are we safe? Probably. Are these numbers concerning? Probably. Words by Pence today will make the stock market crap their pants tomorrow.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
There are kids that are abused that’s not being caught, there are kids that school is their best meal. There are kids where the only normal part of their day is school.
Trust me, I get that part completely.

I have many friends that are teachers and they were FORCED to pass kids.
I told the story on here somewhere of a local public math teacher that was told pass her students if they turned in their papers with any kind of work done on it. One student wrote "this is stupid" on every paper and she had to pass him because turned it in. True story.
Oh ya. My friend teaches at a district in Lake County. Their policy was "automatic pass" provided a student turned in one assignment for every class. Another friend teaches in suburban Dayton: they stuck to letters and percentage grades. But they lost contact with about 100 kids in the high school altogether. Other districts I know of went straight pass/fail, bare minimum will pass a kid and some did pass/fail/incomplete (to be fixed by September 15th of the new school year.) I understand why urban/big city districts have their own problems with this, but there's no reason why suburban and middle-class rural areas need to each have their own race-to-the-bottom standard of passing kids. This I completely agree with the both of you on.

Do you have kids currently in school? Im just curious. I have two still in school. One in Elementary and one in high school. As I said, Kennedy was fantastic but it was still difficult boardering on nearly impossible. Two working parents trying to help an Elementary student do homework and learn new material in 6 or 7 subjects, even with zoom meetings and emails and everything else is ridiculous. It was even harder for a high school student who is in AP and Honors classes. Zoom only goes so far. At one point he told me he was teaching himself physics. They both ended with great grades but imagine schools that dont have good support systems or homes with the same. That is a failure of the kids. Online learning is failing the kids, even in the best situation like my kids have, its still failing them. They need to be in school.
No, I don't. There's a level of understanding I have that online learning can be distressing on parents, but that doesn't mirror the lived experience of the parents whose kids are in this. I do, however, talk to parents in both the public and private systems as well as educators in both systems. My county has some really reputable districts, but the observation (however biased I may be) is that my private took online learning in stride and was able to make it a product worth as much of the tuition as possible with unbending standards and percentage grades at the end. They still gave a ton of homework, too. The elementary tied to the HS gave a bunch of homework, although some of the Karen's were complaining about how "my neighbor's kid goes to [public school] and they only get a half hour of homework for all of her classes for the week, and you're giving them three!" Whether that's a reasonable complaint or not, I'm not sure - but I get why it's made.


That means most of those kids are already a year behind for a virus that shouldn’t keep them out of school. Fortunately JFK kids won’t be behind, but most other school kids will be.
I would much rather have in-person learning. But, I think there's just so many unknowns from a public health perspective. Until there is a more cogent idea on rate of infection, where Ohio is at amid the pandemic, what role in-person schooling has on transmission, I don't think there's any way around online learning in the fall or blended learning at best. At least right now.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
The mask debate has shown how selfish and ugly some Americans are.
I just want people to be vigilant, and aware, man. There's a happy medium between the "staying at home indefinitely" and "living your life and exercising your freedoms." Somewhere in that medium is wearing a mask, give people some space and consider going out less often. It's what we were told long ago.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
You haven't answer the question though. Why are teachers any different than the rest of society? What makes it so horribly dangerous to go to school and do their jobs when everyone else is fully capable to do so? I respect what teachers do and I argue that they are as essential as hospital workers and any other frontline workers but that means actually teaching, in person. ...they go to a great school where they aren't hoping for remote learning or blended learning or any other nonsense that keeps them home.
I'm not going to wade too far into the off-shoot 1v1 debate between you and bkmk1, but I want to make the comment that I'm sure both the school I support and the school your kids go to (both of which are small Catholic high schools) have teachers that are in the "high-risk" group of dying from COVID-19. And they're probably really good teachers (or maybe they aren't, IDK your kids' teachers.) But my point is our schools that did really good jobs with online learning also are in systems that do not attract many younger teachers, let alone teachers that are willing to spend significant time in the system due to the non-existent STRS/pension and low salaries. We have who we have. If COVID-19 killed a teacher at Kennedy, would your opinion on this be possibly changed? Would the Diocese of Youngstown or the JFK administration intervene and force a revert back to online learning? What would you think if that happened?

If there were ever a time I'm asking questions out of pure curiosity and not underhanded debating, this would be a time. I know with "my" school, there are a couple who probably could/would die from COVID-19 and at the same time I'm thinking that its possibly bad PR for the school to be gung-ho about back to in-person learning in these times... and possibly bad for future hiring prospects?
 

Jaws31

Well-known member
I'm not going to wade too far into the off-shoot 1v1 debate between you and bkmk1, but I want to make the comment that I'm sure both the school I support and the school your kids go to (both of which are small Catholic high schools) have teachers that are in the "high-risk" group of dying from COVID-19. And they're probably really good teachers (or maybe they aren't, IDK your kids' teachers.) But my point is our schools that did really good jobs with online learning also are in systems that do not attract many younger teachers, let alone teachers that are willing to spend significant time in the system due to the non-existent STRS/pension and low salaries. We have who we have. If COVID-19 killed a teacher at Kennedy, would your opinion on this be possibly changed? Would the Diocese of Youngstown or the JFK administration intervene and force a revert back to online learning? What would you think if that happened?

If there were ever a time I'm asking questions out of pure curiosity and not underhanded debating, this would be a time. I know with "my" school, there are a couple who probably could/would die from COVID-19 and at the same time I'm thinking that its possibly bad PR for the school to be gung-ho about back to in-person learning in these times... and possibly bad for future hiring prospects?
I was actually talking to a teacher the other day at practice who is older who said he told the administration that he is willing to sign anything that they wantbin order to teach because he loves it there. He's of retirement age. I know the diocese already has things in place for teachers that may come down with it because circumstances have already proved it so.

I understand that there needs to be protection for those that are vulnerable, but isn't that the case for every job? Kids not being in school just isn't going to work.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
First off, MOST teachers don't have the option to just up and quit as was suggested. Most working class people don't have the option to just up and quit a job. Unless they are ready to retire or are wealthy enough. We WANT to be IN THE CLASSROOMS! So that statement in itself is moronic. And when I say online is an option, it is If we are told that is what we are going to do, then that is what we are going to do. But, with that being said, remote will also more than likely replace snow days. Bottom line: we are all hoping to be back in the buildings in the fall. How that will look is anyones guess. All of this is being discussed across the country by "back to school task forces" I'm sure. So only TIME will tell how the 2020-2021 school year will start and finish.
Online learning is a fraud. Kids need to be in school.
 

Jaws31

Well-known member
To answer your question:
1. we don't make that decision, so you would have to ask our admins and school boards or whoever will make the decision about opening and or re-closing if needed.
2. Every teacher I know would 100% much rather be face to face with students than online.
3. I didn't get offended that you questioned why teachers can't do their jobs with precautions as YOU put it. I got offended when you called teachers fragile. But it goes back to us wanting to be with the kids, but it is not our call as I mentioned in the first message as well as this one. So for you to call teachers "fragile" is wrong. Period!
4. You want to blame teachers about remote and blended learning. And stay home and get paid. Those statements tell me what a complete low life you must be. (All the schooling and continuing education, Act 48 hours, possible school shootings, etc.. that we do to be good educators, role models, and protect kids, and this is what you think of teachers). You really are a joke! Good night and good bye.
School shootings....really?
Let me guess, your a drama teacher? My statements about remote learning aren't just about teachers but also the administrators and anyone else who would make those decisions. My question still stands, and maybe you aren't capable of answering it, but why can't aanyone who works in a school do so with proper precautions? I have said this over and over that the kids in this whole bs nonsense have been scapegoats. I would like for one person to tell me why.
 
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jtk

Well-known member
Online learning is not an option. As I have said it was and is a failure. There is no reason teachers cannot be in the classroom with precautions in place. The rest of society is working why are teachers so fragile that they would be extra susceptible to this virus?
im pretty sure deswine isn't worried about the teachers with his decisions. he did cut funding to public schools in ohio. you really posted that lol

jtk
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GLAT

Inactive
The best argument is that kids need sports to focus. Just goes to show you how messed up our kids are if they need sports to focus.

As a Fairfield grad, in my times, sports season just meant the best athletes got away with more and some were still clowns etc in school.
 

cincifbfan

Well-known member
1. My wife is a teacher at one of the top high schools in SW Ohio, according to state report card
2. She wants back in the classroom——not her choice
3. Remote learning required more work and hours compared to regular learning
4. Her district did not require students to be available during school hours, this will change if remote is needed in the fall
5. She could not fail anyone for the semester but could for the year
6. Her principals provided the following.....make your lesson interesting

One thing that remote learning has provided is how useless, in my opinion, principals can be.
I am working remotely and I see the same thing....middle management is basically pointless in this environment
Very well said. This shutdown will dramatically change the workplace for future generations. We are already seeing how much "fat" companies had on their payroll. As you stated, many middle management simply is not needed. We will also see many companies completely abandon the traditional office. Why pay for rent, utilities, security for an endless sea of cubicles when the same can be done with your employees at home? I have also seen companies that were resistant to "flexible work hours" change their attitude, which is great. The bad is we have once again seen workers have much more added onto their plates and have it get done. So now workers are expected to do much more with fewer supports.
 

winbypin

Well-known member
The best argument is that kids need sports to focus. Just goes to show you how messed up our kids are if they need sports to focus.

As a Fairfield grad, in my times, sports season just meant the best athletes got away with more and some were still clowns etc in school.
My best grades were always during a sports season I participated in. HS and college. I think I just had less downtime so I was better organized.
 

yj_runfan

Well-known member
So it begins

On top of everything else... there might not be enough officials to play all the games:

 
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