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zebrastripes

Active member
If the head coach gets T'd up, do all of the coaches have to stay seated?
The head coach is the only one who ever has coaching box privileges. Once any technical foul is assessed to the head coach or bench personnel, the box is lost for the entirety of the game, even if the head coach is ejected and an assistant who hasn’t gotten a T has to take over.
 

coltfan76

Active member
The head coach is the only one who ever has coaching box privileges. Once any technical foul is assessed to the head coach or bench personnel, the box is lost for the entirety of the game, even if the head coach is ejected and an assistant who hasn’t gotten a T has to take over.
Thanks.
 

mcm.1019

Active member
Boxing out on a FT shot...is there any rule prohibiting the bottom guy in the lane from checking his guy out in a face-to-face manner? So rather than stepping up into the lane and getting your butt into the opponent's thigh and riding him out, is it ok to kind of face the opponent and "block" him?
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Boxing out on a FT shot...is there any rule prohibiting the bottom guy in the lane from checking his guy out in a face-to-face manner? So rather than stepping up into the lane and getting your butt into the opponent's thigh and riding him out, is it ok to kind of face the opponent and "block" him?
This isn’t illegal......

However, it is illogical. ;)
 

mcm.1019

Active member
Well, I didn't say it was logical, lol. I coach a MS team that doesn't have much size and we sometimes struggle boxing out bigger kids on FTs. So the 8th grade coach suggested this method (he said girls teams sometimes go that route). He's a varsity official and said he would never call a foul for using this method. But at our game last night the official pulled me aside afterwards and said it's not allowed, and would have to call it in the future. I asked if it was specifically in the rule book and he said yes, which I kind of doubted when I asked him. So I told him our reason, explained that my fellow coach is also an official and that he was the one who actually suggested it. He again told me that it's not allowed.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Well, I didn't say it was logical, lol. I coach a MS team that doesn't have much size and we sometimes struggle boxing out bigger kids on FTs. So the 8th grade coach suggested this method (he said girls teams sometimes go that route). He's a varsity official and said he would never call a foul for using this method. But at our game last night the official pulled me aside afterwards and said it's not allowed, and would have to call it in the future. I asked if it was specifically in the rule book and he said yes, which I kind of doubted when I asked him. So I told him our reason, explained that my fellow coach is also an official and that he was the one who actually suggested it. He again told me that it's not allowed.
Ask him to cite the exact rule that prohibits this. ( rule number, section, and article)

(Impossible for him to do)

and BTW, size has nothing to do with boxing out. While it does not guarantee a rebound will be secured, it does put the opponent in a position to displace her/his opponent, which is a foul....

( and remember, “taller”, is not a foul. :) )
 
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frenchy7705

New member
Quick question...

Player A is on defense and is in a legal guarding position. Player B is on offense and driving down the lane at Player A. Player A NEVER moves his feet or leans side to side. However, Player A slightly leans backwards before Player B initiates contact.

Referee rules a blocking foul on Player A because he began to lean backward before contact occurred. The explanation was once Player A leaned back he was no longer in legal guarding position. Is that the correct interpretation of the rule?
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Quick question...

Player A is on defense and is in a legal guarding position. Player B is on offense and driving down the lane at Player A. Player A NEVER moves his feet or leans side to side. However, Player A slightly leans backwards before Player B initiates contact.

Referee rules a blocking foul on Player A because he began to lean backward before contact occurred. The explanation was once Player A leaned back he was no longer in legal guarding position. Is that the correct interpretation of the rule?
No

In fact, the rules and interpretations specifically allow this movement to occur.
 

D4fan

Well-known member
A player with 4 fouls picks up his fifth foul. Upon leaving the court he demonstrates unsportsmanlike conduct to the level that an additional technical foul is assessed. Since the player has already been disqualified, who is credited with the technical?

Is a player who is disqualified from a game capable of having a technical called on them?
 

zebrastripes

Active member
A player with 4 fouls picks up his fifth foul. Upon leaving the court he demonstrates unsportsmanlike conduct to the level that an additional technical foul is assessed. Since the player has already been disqualified, who is credited with the technical?

Is a player who is disqualified from a game capable of having a technical called on them?
Note that a team member is not officially disqualified until the head coach is notified by an official. This is important because the timing of when the technical foul occurs in relation to that notification determines whether the coach is indirectly charged with that technical foul.

The team member is still “credited” with the technical foul, regardless of whether it’s his sixth foul or not (but if it’s his second technical, he’ll be reported to the OHSAA).

If the technical foul occurs before the coach is notified of the disqualification, it’s simply treated like any other technical foul on a player. However if the technical foul occurs after the coach is notified, that team member is now bench personnel and thus the coach would be indirectly charged with a technical foul and would lose coaching box privileges.
 

Zunardo

Well-known member
If the technical foul occurs before the coach is notified of the disqualification, it’s simply treated like any other technical foul on a player. However if the technical foul occurs after the coach is notified, that team member is now bench personnel and thus the coach would be indirectly charged with a technical foul and would lose coaching box privileges.
Ah, THAT explains a similar (and confusing) situation I saw recently. A player whistled for a 4th foul while defending a shot, then said something in frustration, and got T'd up. Watched ref glance at the table, then went to the bench and say, "that's five, Coach. Need a sub." And then the same player (still on the court) loses it and says a few more choice words. Bam! Another technical.

I heard the official say "indirect technical on the bench", and I thought, "Well, the second one must have been for an assistant coach, and he didn't hear the player - but he called it when the player mouthed off the second time??"

All this transpired pretty quickly. Now it makes sense.
 
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