Ask The Ref?

CoachHoversten

Active member
Had this last year.....

Enforcement spot is the spot of the foul. Since the foul occurred in the end zone, the result is a safety if the penalty is accepted. If it's declined, they keep the ball and have it 1st and 10 at the 30
Who is "they"? The team that intercepted? If that is what you mean, why in the world would the team that threw the INT decline the penalty?
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Who is "they"? The team that intercepted? If that is what you mean, why in the world would the team that threw the INT decline the penalty?
Home Team up big in 4th Q. 3rd string QB calls for a pass play against the wishes of the head coach. Head Coach declines penalty (and the points) allowing the opponent to keep the ball.

It has happened.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
if a qb is out of the pocket within 2 yards of the sideline and throws the ball away downfield (well past LOS), how is grounding called?
Under NFHS Rules.......

Where the passer is on the field is irrelevant.
Whether or not the ball passes the line of scrimmage is irrelevant

Intentional Grounding is defined as:

- A pass intentionally thrown into an area not occupied by an eligible offensive receiver.
- A pass intentionally thrown incomplete to save loss of yardage or to conserve time.
 

USA70PP

Well-known member
This may have been covered earlier. Onside kick.
1 Ball has not gone 10 yards yet. Can K player block R player or must ball have gone 10 yards?
2 Does ball have to hit ground before being played or can K "pooch" it 10 yards?
3 Can K "pooch" cross field hoping for a "burner" from his team being able to field on the fly?
 

chs1971

Well-known member
This may have been covered earlier. Onside kick.
1 Ball has not gone 10 yards yet. Can K player block R player or must ball have gone 10 yards?
2 Does ball have to hit ground before being played or can K "pooch" it 10 yards?
3 Can K "pooch" cross field hoping for a "burner" from his team being able to field on the fly?
1. No, yes.
2. Yes, no.
3. See #2.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Do you know the logic behind the original rule? That you had to take the snap from directly under center?
when the rule was originally written, the “shotgun” formation was rare at best.

it finally changed when it became evident to the committee that the majority of teams were using this formation in situations such as these
 

BleedPurple13

Active member
Team A runs bubble screen but the receiver releases down field slightly first and the ball is thrown over the LOS(1-2 yards). Team A guard immediately fires out and blocks Team B linebacker >3 yards off LOS. Is this ineligible man downfield? Is there a 2 yard grace for a non-engaged player to release downfield if the ball is thrown over the line?

Thank you.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Team A runs bubble screen but the receiver releases down field slightly first and the ball is thrown over the LOS(1-2 yards). Team A guard immediately fires out and blocks Team B linebacker >3 yards off LOS. Is this ineligible man downfield? Is there a 2 yard grace for a non-engaged player to release downfield if the ball is thrown over the line?

Thank you.
2 yard grace? yes

Three yards downfield he is an ineligible downfield.

Since he is blocking it is offensive PI.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
To clarify, the neutral zone may be expanded up to a maximum of two yards behind the defensive line of scrimmage in the field of play during any scrimmage down.
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
Are there any conditions for which a “crack back” or blindside block would be legal?

I was watching a game and saw 1 possible and 1 definite blindside block on the same play within 3 yards of each other along the near sideline which resulted in a long TD. Neither were flagged.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Are there any conditions for which a “crack back” or blindside block would be legal?

I was watching a game and saw 1 possible and 1 definite blindside block on the same play within 3 yards of each other along the near sideline which resulted in a long TD. Neither were flagged.
The definition of a blindside block is...
"a block against an opponent other than the runner, who does not see the blocker approaching."

Not all blindside blocks are illegal. A blindside block with forceful contact initiated with open hands is legal, inside or outside of the free blocking zone.

There is no definition for a crack back block under NFHS Rules.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
0-0 before half, 2nd down... six seconds in the half. Team 'A' kicks field goal, Team 'B' blocks it. A recovers and the ball-carrier never touches the ground, but the play is whistled dead sometime after the block -- it is unclear in real time to me (the spectator) if it is before Team A recovers the ball. Team B thinks the half is over. The refs instruct Team B to go back to the sideline and tell them since it was an inadvertent whistle there's going to be an untimed down for Team A. Team A re-kicks and gets the FG. Goes up 3-0 into half.

Did the refs get this one correct, in issuing an untimed down to Team A as a result of the inadvertent whistle? I know PAT's are blown dead immediately upon a block but not field goals.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
0-0 before half, 2nd down... six seconds in the half. Team 'A' kicks field goal, Team 'B' blocks it. A recovers and the ball-carrier never touches the ground, but the play is whistled dead sometime after the block -- it is unclear in real time to me (the spectator) if it is before Team A recovers the ball. Team B thinks the half is over. The refs instruct Team B to go back to the sideline and tell them since it was an inadvertent whistle there's going to be an untimed down for Team A. Team A re-kicks and gets the FG. Goes up 3-0 into half.

Did the refs get this one correct, in issuing an untimed down to Team A as a result of the inadvertent whistle? I know PAT's are blown dead immediately upon a block but not field goals.
The officials were correct.

- If the whistle was blown before the ball was possessed by A, by rule the down is replayed.
- If the whistle was blown after A was in possession of the ball, A would have the option of either taking the result of the play (which is A is down at the spot he was when the whistle was blown) or replaying the down. In this case, the former is the obvious choice as the half would have ended if they chose the result of the play.

When time expires during a play like this and there are no accepted penalties, an untimed down is awarded,
 
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Yappi

Go Buckeyes
3 Can K "pooch" cross field hoping for a "burner" from his team being able to field on the fly?
I watched this exact play happen about 6 years ago. The "receiver" ended up with a broken leg as the kicking team player dove and caught the ball crashing into the receivers leg. I believe at that time, it was already a penalty and the receiving team got the ball but at a steep price.
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
I watched this exact play happen about 6 years ago. The "receiver" ended up with a broken leg as the kicking team player dove and caught the ball crashing into the receivers leg. I believe at that time, it was already a penalty and the receiving team got the ball but at a steep price.
Obviously, the certified refs on this forum will give a more definitive answer, but I recall it being an NFHS rule that the kicking team cannot legally recover a kickoff that hasn’t either hit the ground or been contacted by the receiving team first.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Obviously, the certified refs on this forum will give a more definitive answer, but I recall it being an NFHS rule that the kicking team cannot legally recover a kickoff that hasn’t either hit the ground or been contacted by the receiving team first.
K cannot touch a free kick in flight, even if there are no R players anywhere near the ball. If they do, then K has committed Kick Catch Interference.

Once a free kick that has been grounded and has gone yards past the free kick line, K may recover the kick, but they cannot advance said kick. The ball becomes dead on the recovery and they will put the ball in play first and ten at that dead ball spot.
 

Racer52

New member
Team A is in "victory formation" running out the clock. Team B has conceded and only the center and QB are actively participating in the plays. On the second victory formation play, Player from Team B comes full speed and pancakes a player from Team A who is simply standing there. Refs throw flag for unsportsmanlike conduct. Is this player automatically ejected from the game or is it refs judgement call?
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Since there is contact it cannot be unsportsmanlike conduct. It would be a personal foul.

There are no automatic ejections for personal fouls. It would be a judgement call.
 

bb9

Active member
Team A is in "victory formation" running out the clock. Team B has conceded and only the center and QB are actively participating in the plays. On the second victory formation play, Player from Team B comes full speed and pancakes a player from Team A who is simply standing there. Refs throw flag for unsportsmanlike conduct. Is this player automatically ejected from the game or is it refs judgement call?
What's the score?
 

AllSports12

Moderator
We can't talk specifics on something we did not see.

That said, when the score is less than a 9 point differential and Team B is out of time outs, we tell Team A to be ready to protect themselves and their teammates. We tell Team B to not do anything stupid.

We cannot tell B to not play as stranger things have happened.

If someone from B (or A) does something stupid, like blindsides a defenseless player, then a flagrant foul could be in order.

Officials who properly manage games rarely have issues with victory formations. Those that lack game management skills or tell teams the wrong thing generally run into issues.
 

Sting10

New member
Help please..... just a question
Could someone assist me. Situation is 4th and less than a yard going into score. Defense jumps off sides and the refs throw the flag.... the ball does not move as they stated it's as far as it goes... no automatic first down? Is this really a rule.
If I'm on the 25 and same situation then the offense is given the First down
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Help please..... just a question
Could someone assist me. Situation is 4th and less than a yard going into score. Defense jumps off sides and the refs throw the flag.... the ball does not move as they stated it's as far as it goes... no automatic first down? Is this really a rule.
If I'm on the 25 and same situation then the offense is given the First down
Encroachment (there is no off sides in High School Football) is never an automatic first down. It's either 5 yards from the previous dead ball spot or half the distance to the goal line from the previous dead ball spot.

Now, you stated "4th and less than a yard going into score"

Did you mean 4th and goal to go?
 

zebrastripes

Active member
Help please..... just a question
Could someone assist me. Situation is 4th and less than a yard going into score. Defense jumps off sides and the refs throw the flag.... the ball does not move as they stated it's as far as it goes... no automatic first down? Is this really a rule.
If I'm on the 25 and same situation then the offense is given the First down
If the line to gain is the goal line you’re never going to get a first down for an encroachment foul.

The only “automatic first downs” in NFHS are for roughing the passer, roughing the kicker/holder, and roughing the snapper.
 
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