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AllSports12

Moderator
What exactly is the rule for ineligible receiver down field? Seems to me it would be impossible to have that called when the scrimmage line is from the 5 yard line on in.
I think you may be incorporating a rule from the NFL regarding when contact can and cannot occur against a receiver here....

Ineligible A players may not advance beyond the expanded neutral zone (up to two yards) on a legal forward pass play before a legal forward pass that crosses the neutral zone is in flight.

An ineligible is not illegally downfield if, at the snap, he immediately contacts a B lineman and the contact does not continue beyond the expanded neutral zone.
 
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Gnep27

New member
First, by rule, anytime a kick enters the end zone, it becomes dead immediately. Once the ball touches the front plane of the goal line, the play is over.

Next, a field goal attempt is a scrimmage kick, just as a punt is. The only difference between the two after the ball is kicked is the scoring potential.

If a field goal attempt is unsuccessful, the play continues just as it would if the ball is punted.
Thank you!
 

bb9

Member
While we should always be watching for it, there is no POE regarding Eligible/Ineligible Receivers this year.
There actually is. Here's an excerpt from our week 1 bulletin:

OHSAA POE for 2019: A. Legality of Low Blocks by A & B; B. Proper procedures for weather delays; & C. Ineligible receivers downfield on run-pass option plays. Please discuss these during your pregame this week.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
There actually is. Here's an excerpt from our week 1 bulletin:

OHSAA POE for 2019: A. Legality of Low Blocks by A & B; B. Proper procedures for weather delays; & C. Ineligible receivers downfield on run-pass option plays. Please discuss these during your pregame this week.
Those weekly bulletins are always going to bring up things that we need to be aware of, as noted in my initial response. No different than what we talk about when we pre-game in the locker room.
 

19AL63

Active member
Went to the Avon lake - Clinton Massie game last night and saw something I have never seen before in all my years of watching football. CM had a first and ten and had a running play that gained 3 yds and a flag was thrown. Without the penalty it would have been second and 7. Here is what happened they set the ball a the point that CM had gained then moved the ball five yds from there and then made the down 1st and two. I did not see what penalty was called but I would have thought it should have been either first and five or possibly second and two. Can you tell me what could have been called that would end up with the result that happened?
 

bb9

Member
Went to the Avon lake - Clinton Massie game last night and saw something I have never seen before in all my years of watching football. CM had a first and ten and had a running play that gained 3 yds and a flag was thrown. Without the penalty it would have been second and 7. Here is what happened they set the ball a the point that CM had gained then moved the ball five yds from there and then made the down 1st and two. I did not see what penalty was called but I would have thought it should have been either first and five or possibly second and two. Can you tell me what could have been called that would end up with the result that happened?
My guess would be a 5 yd facemask
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Went to the Avon lake - Clinton Massie game last night and saw something I have never seen before in all my years of watching football. CM had a first and ten and had a running play that gained 3 yds and a flag was thrown. Without the penalty it would have been second and 7. Here is what happened they set the ball a the point that CM had gained then moved the ball five yds from there and then made the down 1st and two. I did not see what penalty was called but I would have thought it should have been either first and five or possibly second and two. Can you tell me what could have been called that would end up with the result that happened?
My guess would be a 5 yd facemask
The penalty is enforced from the end of the run and since the enforcement did not reach the line to gain, the down is repeated...

1st and 2 is the correct outcome.
 

serpico

Active member
There actually is. Here's an excerpt from our week 1 bulletin:

OHSAA POE for 2019: A. Legality of Low Blocks by A & B; B. Proper procedures for weather delays; & C. Ineligible receivers downfield on run-pass option plays. Please discuss these during your pregame this week.
Thank you.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Anytime the ball is snapped before the ready for play whistle/signal a foul or Delay of Game has occurred. A 5 yard penalty will be assessed and the Referee will wind the clock on the ready for play signal.

This year with the new 40/25 play clock rules, with the clock running, once the ball is spotted by the Umpire (or other official) the ball becomes ready for play (there will be no whistle) and may be legally snapped by Team A.
At the Whitmer-Detroit Catholic Central there were times the game clock was running after a first down and chains hadn't even been set. I'm not sure if they were using Ohio or Michigan rules or if it mattered. I didn't see a play clock anywhere.

After a first down, are there situations in which game and play clock keep running, regardless chains set?
 

AllSports12

Moderator
At the Whitmer-Detroit Catholic Central there were times the game clock was running after a first down and chains hadn't even been set. I'm not sure if they were using Ohio or Michigan rules or if it mattered. I didn't see a play clock anywhere.

After a first down, are there situations in which game and play clock keep running, regardless chains set?
Once the line-to-gain has been reached, the clock should stop. If the play ended in bounds, the clock will be started once the Umpire spots the ball and moves away...... even if the chains are not set.

If the game was played in Ohio, NFHS Rules with Ohio regulations/modifications are used.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
At the Whitmer-Detroit Catholic Central there were times the game clock was running after a first down and chains hadn't even been set. I'm not sure if they were using Ohio or Michigan rules or if it mattered. I didn't see a play clock anywhere.

After a first down, are there situations in which game and play clock keep running, regardless chains set?
It is the one area I have noticed the most change. In the past we would have waited for the down box to be set, sometimes waiting for several seconds, before I would chop and wind the clock. This year when a first down has been reached inbounds, our umpire sets the ball quickly, steps away, and my "silent" wind is almost always before the down box is set.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
Running clock question.
Team A runs the play clock all the way down and calls a TO in a running clock scenario.

When does the clock start again? On the snap or when ball is put back into play?
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Running clock question.
Team A runs the play clock all the way down and calls a TO in a running clock scenario.

When does the clock start again? On the snap or when ball is put back into play?
Running clock question.
Team A runs the play clock all the way down and calls a TO in a running clock scenario.

When does the clock start again? On the snap or when ball is put back into play?
The game clock is to be started once the ready for play signal is given.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Can a rubber football on used during wet games? If so, which manufacturer has a NFHS labeled ball?
Ball may be constructed of cowhide or approved composition (leather or rubber). Any ball that carries the MFHS Authenticating logo is legal (provided the other specifications are met.... i.e., pressure, weight, shape, color)

There are 44 manufacturers that participate in the NFHS Authenticating Program. Some of the most recognizable are Nike, Rawlings, Baden and Wilson.

The Wilson GST is the Official Game Ball of the OHSAA Football Playoffs.
 

Thereddragin

New member
With this being a new rule this year would this be a legal formation... see attached 20190911_094856.jpg

I know there are only 6 on the LOS...

Also what exactly constitutes a "back". A player off the LOS inside the tackles?

ART. 5... Player formation and numbering requirements include:

a. At the snap, at least five A players shall be on their line of scrimmage and no more than four A players may be backs.

b. At the snap, at least five A players on their line of scrimmage must be numbered 50-79.


Thanks in advance
 

HomeRun10

New member
How long do officials give a play to deem it stopped due to forward progress? The Rittman vs Champion game last week had a play 3 and goal from the 2 that was a dive up the middle and 11 seconds went off the clock with the running back in the middle of a scrum at the 1. The refs let it play out and it resulted in a TD. Should it have been whistled dead before that though?
 

AllSports12

Moderator
With this being a new rule this year would this be a legal formation... see attached View attachment 3596

I know there are only 6 on the LOS...
This is an illegal formation......

The rule change for this year allows for as little as 5 on the line of scrimmage, (numbered 50-79) however you cannot have more than 5 players in the backfield. The cluster of players split to the right has 4 off the line. Add those 4 to the QB and you have 5 in the backfield.

Also what exactly constitutes a "back". A player off the LOS inside the tackles?

Thanks in advance
A back is any A player who has no part of his body breaking the plane of an imaginary line drawn parallel to the line of scrimmage through the waist of the nearest teammate who is legally on the line, except for the player under the snapper, who is also considered a back.
 
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AllSports12

Moderator
How long do officials give a play to deem it stopped due to forward progress? The Rittman vs Champion game last week had a play 3 and goal from the 2 that was a dive up the middle and 11 seconds went off the clock with the running back in the middle of a scrum at the 1. The refs let it play out and it resulted in a TD. Should it have been whistled dead before that though?
There is no set time that we use to make a determination when the play should be stopped and it is impossible to say whether or not the play you describe should have been blown dead without being there to see the play.

Now, some rules of thumb...

If a defender has control of a runner and begins to bring him to the ground backwards and still in control, forward progress has ended and the play should be blown dead.

If a defender has control of a runner and even though the runner's legs are still moving, he is not gaining forwards ground, then forward progress has ended and the play should be blown dead.
 
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Thereddragin

New member
This is an illegal formation......

The rule change for this year allows for as little as 5 on the line of scrimmage, (numbered 50-79) however you cannot have more than 5 players in the backfield. The cluster of players split to the right has 4 off the line. Add those 4 to the QB and you have 5 in the backfield.
So essentially you still have to have 7 on the LOS then?
 

Thereddragin

New member
No

You can have 5, but not more than 4 in the backfield.

In the diagram, there are 5 players in the backfield.
Hmm guess I'm having a hard time grasping how if you can only have 4 in the backfield, that leaves 7 that can't be and therefore have to be on the LOS. Could you draw me an example of only 6 on LOS? Thanks!
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Hmm guess I'm having a hard time grasping how if you can only have 4 in the backfield, that leaves 7 that can't be and therefore have to be on the LOS. Could you draw me an example of only 6 on LOS? Thanks!
4 in the backfield, 6 on the LOS... 10 total players.

The rule change does not penalize teams for having less than 11 on the field as long as there are at least 5 on the line.
 
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shadow1479

Member
Outside of two unsportmanslike conduct fouls. What warrants a player ejection? Besides fighting, specifically what type of hit should require a player being ejected?

Thanks
 
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AllSports12

Moderator
Thank you! Think I grasp it now lol
(y)(y)

Having only 6 players on the line was the most common reason for an illegal formation foul. The predominant reason why teams had only 6 on the line is that they had only 10 on the field. After reviewing it for a couple of years the rule committee felt that if a team was to run a play 10 against 11, that was in and of itself a penalty, so they made the change....

- 5 or more on the line
- no more than 4 in the backfield
- 11 players maximum
 

zebrastripes

Active member
Outside of two unsportmanslike conduct fouls. What warrants a player ejection? Besides fighting, specifically what type of hit should require a player being ejected?

Thanks
A flagrant foul is "a foul so severe or extreme that it places an opponent in danger of serious injury and/or involves violations that are extremely or persistently vulgar or abusive conduct."

A hit where there is intent to punish/injure (i.e. headhunting) should result in a DQ (gunner barrels into punt returner, a blindside block running full speed upstream, etc.).
Standing over your opponent after clocking him to the turf can also be a good indicator of a flagrant personal foul.
Most big hits that I see lauded on social media (e.g. Jukes) are flagrant fouls.

At the end of the day it's up to the judgment of the officials. In my experience, flagrant fouls usually call themselves.
 
How does a receiver establish a catch and being in bounds?
E.g.
A receiver jumps to catch the ball. Defender grabs him while reveiver is in the air and the momentum carries the receiver out of bounds before any part of the receiver's body can touch the ground. Is this a catch?
 
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