Ask the ref?

A goal was scored but was not counted, whose at fault? The video is from Monday night's game between Bay (at the time 11-1-0) at Avon Lake (at the time 11-1-1) match. As you can/will see, a shot by the Avon Lake player is tipped up by the Bay keeper and it appears to go over the cross bar at normal speed from a far. Ref declares a corner kick. Avon Lake players point out the hole in the top of the netting and state that it was a goal. From the non-VAR approved replay (because high school does not have it), you can see that the ball should have been declared a goal.

The match ended in a draw when it looks like Avon Lake would have won the match with that goal.

The game was at Avon Lake. Who is responsible for allowing or knowing that the giant hole exists in the net? I had a coach say it was the referees fault for not addressing the net before the game. Some folks are saying that it is the Avon Lake's Athletic Director's fault because he was informed about the problem. Some will say it is the Avon Lake coaches fault for not following through and getting it repaired/replaced.

I have a hard time blaming the referees as they are not required to perform maintenance on a field. They can only declare if the field conditions are not safe, etc. I have no idea if they had knowledge before the game of the condition of the net. Even if they knew of the hole, I am not sure that they would have seen the ball pass through the hole. So in my opinion, it comes down to the coach and the AD. To me, the fact that the tie gets hung on the team's won-loss record, it is on the coach to grab a few zip ties and fix the net before the match. Thoughts?

Referees should have caught it pregame
 
The Avon Lake/Bay video in question was done by a human being, since it is Ohio Sports Net.

In terms of the Copley/Revere video, as per a social media referees group, white No. 6 was sent off via red card (violent conduct) as conveyed to both teams benches though no card was shown (the white team played down a player for the rest of the match).
 
How is it possible that a player gets a red in the district semifinal then plays the next game in the district final?
 
There appear to be at least 2 instances of straight reds getting reduced during the playoffs.

It's a big state though. Could be a lot more that get swept under the rug.
 
How is it possible that a player gets a red in the district semifinal then plays the next game in the district final?
It’s rather new, but the OHSAA has instituted an appeals process for ejections/red cards, so I imagine that’s the answer.
 
It’s rather new, but the OHSAA has instituted an appeals process for ejections/red cards, so I imagine that’s the answer.
The postseason guide that goes out to coaches and referees still says 'ALL PLAYER AND COACH EJECTIONS ARE FINAL AND NOT PERMITTED TO BE APPEALED'

Do you have a link to the explanation of how this process works?
 
Those are general.

In there it says under 14.1.10 'In accordance with Bylaw 8-3-1, the decisions of contest officials are final.'

Also the soccer specific rules for the playoffs say there are no appeals.

Those are distributed to every coach and official before the playoffs began.
It says in the link I provided that there is an appeals process for suspension length. Did you not see that part?
 
It says in the link I provided that there is an appeals process for suspension length. Did you not see that part?
Yes I did. Control+F is a wonderful tool.

Neither case I know of was for fighting which as I understand is the only red that can be reduced.

Also, again, that link is for general rules.

The rules put out specifically for the soccer playoffs clearly state 'ALL PLAYER AND COACH EJECTIONS ARE FINAL AND NOT PERMITTED TO BE APPEALED'
 
Yes I did. Control+F is a wonderful tool.

Neither case I know of was for fighting which as I understand is the only red that can be reduced.

Also, again, that link is for general rules.

The rules put out specifically for the soccer playoffs clearly state 'ALL PLAYER AND COACH EJECTIONS ARE FINAL AND NOT PERMITTED TO BE APPEALED'
yeah the general rules still apply to soccer.

when it says “all ejections are final” what that means is “the game is not being replayed.” A player was issued a red card, the team played down, the game is over, that’s final. The Length of the suspension is appealable.
 
yeah the general rules still apply to soccer.

when it says “all ejections are final” what that means is “the game is not being replayed.” A player was issued a red card, the team played down, the game is over, that’s final. The Length of the suspension is appealable.
Only for fighting.

That wasn't the case here.
 
This is from the OHSAA website 2023 Soccer Tournament Regulations PDF -

19) UNSPORTING CONDUCT REQUIREMENTS AND PENALTIES

a) Participation in athletic contests is a privilege. Everyone is expected to conduct him /herself in an exemplary manner while participating.
b) During participation in OHSAA Tournaments, any student or coach will fall into one of the categories below as it relates to penalty and repercussion:

Card(s) - Day of penalty consequence - Matches missed AFTER day of event
Yellow card - May still play in match - misses 0 matches
Double Yellow cards - Ineligible for remainder of match - misses next 1 match
Red card - Ineligible for remainder of match - misses next 2 matches
Red card for Violent Conduct/Fighting - Ineligible for remainder of match - miss next 4 matches

Note: The definition of fighting is found in the NFHS playing rules and reads as follows: “Fighting is any attempt by a player or non-player to strike or engage a player or non-player in a combative manner unrelated to the sport. Such acts include, but are not limited to, attempts to strike an opponent(s) with the arm(s), hand(s), leg(s), or foot (feet), whether or not there is contact.”

I see no mention of an appeal process.
 
This is from the OHSAA website 2023 Soccer Tournament Regulations PDF -

19) UNSPORTING CONDUCT REQUIREMENTS AND PENALTIES

a) Participation in athletic contests is a privilege. Everyone is expected to conduct him /herself in an exemplary manner while participating.
b) During participation in OHSAA Tournaments, any student or coach will fall into one of the categories below as it relates to penalty and repercussion:

Card(s) - Day of penalty consequence - Matches missed AFTER day of event
Yellow card - May still play in match - misses 0 matches
Double Yellow cards - Ineligible for remainder of match - misses next 1 match
Red card - Ineligible for remainder of match - misses next 2 matches
Red card for Violent Conduct/Fighting - Ineligible for remainder of match - miss next 4 matches

Note: The definition of fighting is found in the NFHS playing rules and reads as follows: “Fighting is any attempt by a player or non-player to strike or engage a player or non-player in a combative manner unrelated to the sport. Such acts include, but are not limited to, attempts to strike an opponent(s) with the arm(s), hand(s), leg(s), or foot (feet), whether or not there is contact.”

I see no mention of an appeal process.
Yet per multiple posters on this website, players have been disqualified and then played the next game, so what’s going on?
 
Alright so what’s the alternative answer? The OHSAA has a secret appeals process, or the schools aren’t following the rules?
It all depends who complains.

Some get appeals.

Some are allowed to play ineligible kids all the way through to a state final.

Others appeal with video complaining the wrong player was issued a red card and are turned down.

Don't be so naive to think these things don't occur.
 
It all depends who complains.

Some get appeals.

Some are allowed to play ineligible kids all the way through to a state final.

Others appeal with video complaining the wrong player was issued a red card and are turned down.

Don't be so naive to think these things don't occur.
You would think such things would lead to lawsuits
 
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