OHSAA Memo To Member Schools Dissects Governor DeWine's Re-opening Of Sports

BigArrrow

Active member
I never understood why people think its a bad thing to have an education and post on a forum. Is some of this over your head? It can always be dumbed down. Most of it is 6th grade biology.
I never understood why people think its a bad thing to have an education and post on a forum. Is some of this over your head? It can always be dumbed down. Most of it is 6th grade biology.
Having a education is great, acting like you know what’s going with this virus is pathetic. Have a good day Doc
 

TigerPaw

Well-known member
That is probably spot on. The only issue I see is what the teachers and administrators feeling is. The reality of the situation is that those will be the people most at risk. As their age gets closer to 50+, the numbers show that they are at a higher risk for severe complications. That risk may be minimal, but it is higher.
True. They can be further away, and masked, but, I suppose you could provide same option for older teachers or with pre-existing conditions etc. Ie. some courses only offered via internet (or pickup and delivery).
 

The Dock

Well-known member
They already have the choice to homeschool. Always have. Virtual learning will devastate school districts. Many many parents will unenroll their children to bypass the middle man of the teacher. Fewer enrolled students means even bigger budget cuts
Parents who are considering homeschool aren’t doing it to “bypass the middle man of teacher” - they’re doing it because of their attitudes toward public education.
 

TigerPaw

Well-known member
They already have the choice to homeschool. Always have. Virtual learning will devastate school districts. Many many parents will unenroll their children to bypass the middle man of the teacher. Fewer enrolled students means even bigger budget cuts
And tax savings (?). Like it or not simply the way education is evolving w/ new technology. But in the immediate term, under these extraordinary circumstances, have to think outside the box.
 

cknights

Active member
Having a education is great, acting like you know what’s going with this virus is pathetic. Have a good day Doc
Again. 6th grade biology teaches the reproduction, mutation and spread of a virus. Shoot me a personal message if you need further guidance on what a coronavirus is, how a virus spreads, what R0 (R Naught) is, herd immunity, or anything that is confusing. Not being demeaning but the people that get on here calling others "doc" or "expert" just sound extremely uneducated and likely are not educated by a higher institution. Would be happy to help with any confusion on the subjects discussed above.
 

cknights

Active member
And tax savings (?). Like it or not simply the way education is evolving w/ new technology. But in the immediate term, under these extraordinary circumstances, have to think outside the box.
My school district just recieved news that they have to cut their budget by $172,000 this quarter due to the state budget cuts. It is a small (D7 football) district. If you want to talk about thinking outside the box, its going to come to cutting extracurricular activities, teachers, and hurt the kids more than you are even imagining. If this way of thinking goes on into the fall, we will see devistating effects on schools across Ohio and the country. $172,000 is simply the beginning of what will be a bigger and bigger chunk each quarter.
 

TigerPaw

Well-known member
Budget cuts have been choking our educational system and system of funding for years now. Sometimes to devastating effects. Nothing new. Esp. lower income districts w/ little to any disposable funds. I'm a "support your local school levy" guy but I think we're a dying breed. Vote! All we can do.
 

cknights

Active member
Budget cuts have been choking our educational system and system of funding for years now. Sometimes to devastating effects. Nothing new. Esp. lower income districts w/ little to any disposable funds. I'm a "support your local school levy" guy but I think we're a dying breed. Vote! All we can do.
We are a wealthy school district that has multi-hundreds of thousands that come in per year from windmills. However, the sustainability of small school districts with no such funding is on the verge of collapse under our current trend. As people lose jobs, the economy tanks, the schools lose money, parents are forced to stay home with kids, and so on.......the balloon eventually pops because not everyone can still vote to support their levy and even if they can, they may not have a job that contributes to said levy. My school district will survive for now. Unfortunately, many won't under the current model. Economically speaking, kids need to go back to school.

That said, I agree with supporting the levies. I also will concede that many of those that despise the stay at home and virtual learning models will not vote yes and I respect their opinions as well.
 

Qcity

Well-known member
Budget cuts have been choking our educational system and system of funding for years now. Sometimes to devastating effects. Nothing new. Esp. lower income districts w/ little to any disposable funds. I'm a "support your local school levy" guy but I think we're a dying breed. Vote! All we can do.


We spend more on education every, single, year.

Get in the game.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Viruses have natural “instinct” to spread as quickly as possible. Genetic mutations happen when they jump from host to host and change their own DNA or RNA based upon its genetic material. Sometimes mistakenly. Sometimes purposely to survive. The goal of any virus is to find a host to house its reproduction. A dead host doesn’t work. But mistaken or purposeful adaptation and mutation occurs to keep hosts living for reproduction purposes. It’s biology 101.
Like I thought.
 

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
Overall, it looks like 2 out of those 3 weren't really anything. The 3rd was just dumb but both sides of the statistics debate have put out equally stupid statements trying to open things up or keep them closed.

Pretty dumb to post a chart not in chronological order.

From the original article the day before:
"Data access has not worsened further, yet, but researchers are sounding the alarm in response to Jones' email. " (Link)

Maybe she just wasn't that good at her job. She sounds like an awful lot of disgruntled travel ball parents who blame the coach for their children's lack of success.

The next 4 days were less than half that day. Those 4 days were below the average for May.
 

spirit454

Active member
My school district just recieved news that they have to cut their budget by $172,000 this quarter due to the state budget cuts. It is a small (D7 football) district. If you want to talk about thinking outside the box, its going to come to cutting extracurricular activities, teachers, and hurt the kids more than you are even imagining. If this way of thinking goes on into the fall, we will see devistating effects on schools across Ohio and the country. $172,000 is simply the beginning of what will be a bigger and bigger chunk each quarter.
The school is cutting their budget $172,000 for this quarter? Are you saying your small D7 football school has to cut their 2020-2021 operating budget by $688,000?
 

cknights

Active member
The school is cutting their budget $172,000 for this quarter? Are you saying your small D7 football school has to cut their 2020-2021 operating budget by $688,000?
$182,177 was lost in state funding for the remainder of this school year and hit this quarter. I was actually $10K short. As we are operating on government fiscal quarters, it is expected that we will see this kind of operating budget cuts quarterly until the school systems/economy open up and Ohio can afford to stop cutting educational funding.

That is funding for the entire school. Not just a football program. But yes. We are looking at a potential of $700,000 in budget cuts while this "pandemic" lasts.
 

cincyhoops

Well-known member
According to our local district, the state is gathering information to make it's case that learning from home for the masses can drastically set back education and that in class teaching will provide a far better result for the general student at all ages kindergarten to college. This along with the stats that show children's risks for this virus are being combined to show schools can be reopened safely.
The survey in our district had 2 questions.

#1: Do you have Internet access at home?
#2: Do you have a device (computer, tablet, etc...) at home?

That was the entire survey.

Here is the email that went with it: "State leaders are developing a map of student Internet access in Ohio to help make funding decisions. The ODE is asking each district to provide info regarding student Internet access at home".

They didn't ask any questions about how it affected students learning on anything like that. Just my opinion, but sure sounds like they are preparing for at least the potential to be online when school starts in August.
 

cincifbfan

Well-known member
I was refuting the inaccurate statement made by TigerPaw
You are both correct. Budget cuts have been choking our schools for years. Just because we spend more, doesn't mean his statement is inaccurate. Inflation accounts for much of that increased spending.

You will see dramatic cuts this year with over 76 million in cuts state wide. Many schools have just finally recovered from the Great Recession, and some never have.
 

TheDuq

Active member
I can say with certainty, across the state, with the information that NCAA is allowing on-campus voluntary workouts beginning June 1st, high school campuses are preparing to do the same, however, that is a completely different ballgame. If you can workout small groups at your facilities, then schools should be able to operate to a degree. However, what contradicts everything is with NFHS Phase III, sports without fans.

They are all over the place right now, complete dysfunction in my opinion.
 

bucksman

Moderator
I can say with certainty, across the state, with the information that NCAA is allowing on-campus voluntary workouts beginning June 1st, high school campuses are preparing to do the same, however, that is a completely different ballgame. If you can workout small groups at your facilities, then schools should be able to operate to a degree. However, what contradicts everything is with NFHS Phase III, sports without fans.

They are all over the place right now, complete dysfunction in my opinion.
Of course they are. You have different groups, with different people involved making the decisions, that have differing goals.

NFHS is always about risk minimization, CYA type of stuff.

NCAA wants to have a season in place for their primary revenue sports (DI concept), since without those seasons, athletic departments could be facing even more stark budgetary situations. Colleges also probably want to have some semblance of campus life if they can, because w/o campus life they lose some justification for existence in the first place.
 

CoventryTrackXCguy

Active member
Overall, it looks like 2 out of those 3 weren't really anything. The 3rd was just dumb but both sides of the statistics debate have put out equally stupid statements trying to open things up or keep them closed.


Pretty dumb to post a chart not in chronological order.


From the original article the day before:
"Data access has not worsened further, yet, but researchers are sounding the alarm in response to Jones' email. " (Link)

Maybe she just wasn't that good at her job. She sounds like an awful lot of disgruntled travel ball parents who blame the coach for their children's lack of success.


The next 4 days were less than half that day. Those 4 days were below the average for May.
This is an article you might find interesting; https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/coronavirus-in-the-us-at-least-4-states-combined-numbers-from-two-tests/ar-BB14p21A?ocid=msedgdhp.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Parents who are considering homeschool aren’t doing it to “bypass the middle man of teacher” - they’re doing it because of their attitudes toward public education.
What is it about public education they don't like if it's not what the teachers are delivering?
 

tom 48

Well-known member
What is it about public education they don't like if it's not what the teachers are delivering?
Constant state and national testing interfering with actual classroom time. Need for religious indoctrination not provided by the public schools. Need to "protect" the child from the realities of life. And , in some cases, the child really needs the personal care because of a severe learning disability.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Constant state and national testing interfering with actual classroom time. Need for religious indoctrination not provided by the public schools. Need to "protect" the child from the realities of life. And , in some cases, the child really needs the personal care because of a severe learning disability.
"Constant" testing. That's hilarious. The rest is bigoted nonsense.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Personal care for severe learning disabilities is "bigoted nonsense"?
Yes, because that is an extremely small number. There are lot more students with severe learning disabilities in school than being home schooled.

The fact that you don't know what you are talking about is not a reflection on me.
 
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