OHSAA Memo To Member Schools Dissects Governor DeWine's Re-opening Of Sports

radiodaveagain

Active member
OHSAA Memo To Member Schools Dissects Governor DeWine's Re-opening Of Sports

To:All OHSAA Member Schools’ Superintendents, Principals and Athletic Administrators

From:Jerry Snodgrass, Executive Director

Good early evening to each of you as we continue to dissect yesterday’s announcements by Governor DeWine. While his re-opening of sports appears to be directed to all non-school sports (club/travel/AAU/etc.), the measures do have implications on school districts and regulations for school coaches and student-athletes. This is especially true for the number of non-school sports that utilize school facilities. While we awaited guidance to be posted last evening, it was posted mid-day today and is incomplete as of this communication. Here is what we CAN provide at this time and, while I have tried to limit communication, I also want it to be timely and correct. I encourage you to communicate with your coaches and, while schools often release this to the media, we are not doing that in the attempt to make certain YOU receive this and can directly communicate with your coaching staff and ultimately with student-athletes at your respective schools. While I respect the disagreement coaches often have, I can assure you that decisions have been made in the best interests of health and safety AND utilizing the insight of the professionals we must trust.

Yesterday’s Announcement

Information that is available at this time:

1. The OHSAA spring sports seasons and tournaments have been cancelled and will not be conducted during the summer. This decision was made looking at every possible option at the time. It simply is not possible to put spring sports in place for everyone at this time. We have continued to use every possible avenue to be involved with “reopening” Ohio’s sports and, while our communication has been acknowledged, we still do not have a seat at the table for the reopening.

2.School facilities and buildings are not under the OHSAA’s jurisdiction and therefore we have no ability to require them to be opened/closed. We emphasized this in recent communications. Lt. Gov. Husted indicated yesterday that Local Departments of Health will determine the safe reopening of school outdoor facilities. With the Director of the Ohio Dept. of Health’s signing of the “Second Amended Order the Closure of All K-12 Schools in the State of Ohio” on April 29, it required the closure of all school buildings.


3. On April 30, the Director of the State Dept. of Health identified various facilities CLOSED in the “Stay-Safe-Ohio-Order” signed on that date. This included but was not limited to STADIUMS (listed in 11 (g) page 5/6) in the order at: https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/static/publicorders/Directors-Stay-Safe-Ohio-Order.pdf. Please see item #13 (specifically items ‘a’ and ‘g’). A comment yesterday during the press conference seems to have raised questions about potential school facilities outside school buildings.
  1. Yesterday (May 14, 2020) the Governor announced that “low/non-contact sports” would be permitted to ‘open’ on May 26, 2020, with guidance to be posted later that evening.
  1. Since volumes of emails/texts/calls began coming in from schools, a communication was sent to all school administrators urging patience while we inquired about the various statements made during the news conference and that more guidance would be sent today (Friday).
  2. Guidance was finally posted mid-day and was incomplete since it only referred to Baseball & Softball. These Guidelines include both MANDATORY guidelines and Recommended Best Practices and are available at: https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/static/responsible/Baseball-Softball.pdf
Governor DeWine’s Thursday Announcement Affecting Non-School Sports

Yesterday’s announcement from the Governor’s office has created many questions for schools and all relevant parties (coaches, student-athletes and parents). While we continue to learn more and dissect the information available, we want to provide you with the most current information.

Additional guidelines may become available from the Governor’s office before May 26 regarding gyms, pools and other sports. All provided guidelines will be available at:

https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/responsible-restart-ohio/Sector-Specific-Operating-Requirements/

Adjustment to the OHSAA’s No-Contact Period – Limited Sports

Since Governor DeWine announced yesterday in his “Responsible Restart Ohio” plan that certain sports will be permitted to begin on May 26, it becomes necessary to provide school coaches the opportunities. Effective May 26, the OHSAA’s No-Contact Period will be lifted for the following sports:
  • · Baseball*
  • · Golf
  • · Softball*
  • · Swimming & Diving
  • · Tennis
  • · Track & Field
Mandatory & Recommended guidelines for baseball and softball are found at: https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/static/responsible/Baseball-Softball.pdf
 
Last edited by a moderator:

TheDuq

Active member
This whole "concept" sounds miserable. Not sure why someone would participate in these in conditions.
 
It’s really not important when you consider that schools have no plan for reopening. Suggestions have included a 2 day in school and 2 day virtual learning format. With that in mind, you cannot justify bringing athletes in 5-6 days a week for extra-curricular sports. School budgets also just got slashed and are about to take a 20-30 percent cut from state. Every penny will be precious and let’s be honest, sports do not generate revenue, they actually cost more. I hope to god I’m wrong but I fear 2020-2021 is going to be cancelled. I just can’t see economics supporting it.
 

Jaws31

Well-known member
It’s really not important when you consider that schools have no plan for reopening. Suggestions have included a 2 day in school and 2 day virtual learning format. With that in mind, you cannot justify bringing athletes in 5-6 days a week for extra-curricular sports. School budgets also just got slashed and are about to take a 20-30 percent cut from state. Every penny will be precious and let’s be honest, sports do not generate revenue, they actually cost more. I hope to god I’m wrong but I fear 2020-2021 is going to be cancelled. I just can’t see economics supporting it.
There actually is a plan to go back, one that involves masks and social distancing among other things, but a plan nonetheless. Sports do generate decent revenue and I would argue would bring in even more next fall. I believe more people would go to games to support the kids. Despite what all the doom and gloomers on here love to spout about this being the end of civilization as we know it, they are the vocal minority. I just got home from being out and about running errands and going to various stores and the vast majority of people were out without masks, the stores were packed and people seemed genuinely happy to be out, not just out to get things to survive. People were respectful of each others space, which is smart and I can fully see that happening at football games in the fall. Everyone will be ready for as much normalcy as possible and not the "new normal" bs that is being peddled either.
 

birdog

Well-known member
Just read an article in USA Today that involved an interview with NCAA Chief Medical Officer Brian Hainline and what he feels must and will be done in order for college football to happen this fall. If this trickles down to the high school level and I don't see why it would not, then there is no chance that high school football happens anywhere in the country this fall. Hainline is calling for daily testing of all players and coaches up to and including game day once camp opens. Footballs may not be shared during practice or games. Coaches over a certain age will be required to stay away from players and wear masks at all times. The cost Hainline says could be prohibitive especially since there will be very limited fan base at the games. One or two positive cases would mean quarantine for the entire position group. This would effectively cause postponements of games for as many as two weeks at a time. If this man is correct, I just don't see how any high school in the country could possibly implement these standards and you know that Governors, college Presidents and school Superintendents are going to be taking their cue from college and professional administration. This gets more complicated by the day and I fear that most schools have already made up their minds to bag the 2020-2021 athletic programs but are afraid to make the announcement at this time. GBM
 

MassillonTigers3

Well-known member
From May 1-15 Texas conducted over 300,000 tests. And had a positive test rate of 3.8%. In the entire month of April they did 282,000 tests and had a positive rate of 8.9%.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
I wasn’t trying to suggest going back right now. But if it’s safe enough for baseball to be starting, gyms to be open, pools to be open, restaurants, etc why on earth can’t people go to school lol
It's not "safe enough" for baseball/gyms/restaurants to return to their normal operations pre-COVID, though. Again, school doesn't know for 3 months - the safety of "returning to school" is yet to be defined because there's no prognosis of what public health looks like in August. Hence, why no reason to be definitive currently.
 

dukie

Member
Just read an article in USA Today that involved an interview with NCAA Chief Medical Officer Brian Hainline and what he feels must and will be done in order for college football to happen this fall. If this trickles down to the high school level and I don't see why it would not, then there is no chance that high school football happens anywhere in the country this fall. Hainline is calling for daily testing of all players and coaches up to and including game day once camp opens. Footballs may not be shared during practice or games. Coaches over a certain age will be required to stay away from players and wear masks at all times. The cost Hainline says could be prohibitive especially since there will be very limited fan base at the games. One or two positive cases would mean quarantine for the entire position group. This would effectively cause postponements of games for as many as two weeks at a time. If this man is correct, I just don't see how any high school in the country could possibly implement these standards and you know that Governors, college Presidents and school Superintendents are going to be taking their cue from college and professional administration. This gets more complicated by the day and I fear that most schools have already made up their minds to bag the 2020-2021 athletic programs but are afraid to make the announcement at this time. GBM
So everyone gets their own football? That would be quite entertaining.
:)
 

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
Just read an article in USA Today that involved an interview with NCAA Chief Medical Officer Brian Hainline and what he feels must and will be done in order for college football to happen this fall. If this trickles down to the high school level and I don't see why it would not, then there is no chance that high school football happens anywhere in the country this fall. Hainline is calling for daily testing of all players and coaches up to and including game day once camp opens. Footballs may not be shared during practice or games. Coaches over a certain age will be required to stay away from players and wear masks at all times. The cost Hainline says could be prohibitive especially since there will be very limited fan base at the games. One or two positive cases would mean quarantine for the entire position group. This would effectively cause postponements of games for as many as two weeks at a time. If this man is correct, I just don't see how any high school in the country could possibly implement these standards and you know that Governors, college Presidents and school Superintendents are going to be taking their cue from college and professional administration. This gets more complicated by the day and I fear that most schools have already made up their minds to bag the 2020-2021 athletic programs but are afraid to make the announcement at this time. GBM
I think this guy was making recommendations but I doubt some of the stuff he has suggested goes into practice. I also think one of the things being forgotten is the possible immunity that many may already have. Britain recently did a study that said they have 19 million residents that have the antibodies compared to 240,000 positive tests (80x). If that figure is correct and the United States has similar numbers, a large percentage of the population may have nothing to worry about in August (and yes, I know there is no guarantee of immunity).
 

The Dock

Well-known member
There actually is a plan to go back, one that involves masks and social distancing among other things, but a plan nonetheless. Sports do generate decent revenue and I would argue would bring in even more next fall. I believe more people would go to games to support the kids. Despite what all the doom and gloomers on here love to spout about this being the end of civilization as we know it, they are the vocal minority.
More people going to games? High school football fandom is arguably less significant in much of Ohio's culture than it was 15-20 years ago. What is it about a contagion that makes you think folks all of the sudden care more about the games?

re: forums/"doom and gloomers" - uh huh... I'm far from a "doom and gloomer" but the posting base of a high school sports forum is not the most accurate representation of society.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
Just read an article in USA Today that involved an interview with NCAA Chief Medical Officer Brian Hainline and what he feels must and will be done in order for college football to happen this fall. If this trickles down to the high school level and I don't see why it would not, then there is no chance that high school football happens anywhere in the country this fall. Hainline is calling for daily testing of all players and coaches up to and including game day once camp opens. Footballs may not be shared during practice or games. Coaches over a certain age will be required to stay away from players and wear masks at all times. The cost Hainline says could be prohibitive especially since there will be very limited fan base at the games. One or two positive cases would mean quarantine for the entire position group. This would effectively cause postponements of games for as many as two weeks at a time. If this man is correct, I just don't see how any high school in the country could possibly implement these standards and you know that Governors, college Presidents and school Superintendents are going to be taking their cue from college and professional administration. This gets more complicated by the day and I fear that most schools have already made up their minds to bag the 2020-2021 athletic programs but are afraid to make the announcement at this time. GBM
College football is facing two directly interconnected issues that is threatening the institution of the sport in the COVID-19 era: 1) only having college football players on-campus with the rest of the student body directly eliminates the flimsy pretense of "they're students who choose to play sports, thus they are amateurs who should not be directly compensated for their talent" that the NCAA has been championing for the past 25-30 years. 1a) schools having the general student body on-campus this coming fall is ideal and would mitigate the first issue, except it then invariably increases the odds of someone(s) on the team contracting the coronavirus. How many tests are going to get sunk into keeping the Ohio State football team actively monitored? If COVID-19 penetrates the dorm(s) that the football team has players pent up in then it stands to rip through the place like wildfire.

Is every school just going to keep their football teams sequestered in the dorms for the next 6-7 months, only allowing movement to and from the practice facility? What happens if a player breaks that policy? What happens if a star player breaks that policy? Just a lot of uncertainty surrounding college football. The big schools can think of plenty of great policies to protect their investments, but they're only as great as the team's compliance with the policy.
 

CC Track Fan

Active member
If COVID-19 penetrates the dorm(s) that the football team has players pent up in then it stands to rip through the place like wildfire.
College football player are at little to no risk of CV-19. Here are some stats I pulled a couple days ago that show unless you are over 70 or living in a nursing home you have little risk.

Capture.JPG
 

Jaws31

Well-known member
More people going to games? High school football fandom is arguably less significant in much of Ohio's culture than it was 15-20 years ago. What is it about a contagion that makes you think folks all of the sudden care more about the games?

re: forums/"doom and gloomers" - uh huh... I'm far from a "doom and gloomer" but the posting base of a high school sports forum is not the most accurate representation of society.
I do think more people will go to the games for the exact reasons that I stated. Some will stay home I'm sure, but almost everyone associated with any school is completely fed up with the wayvthings have been handled. Ask any senior parent about the ridiculous graduations that are being held. And you are right, the forums are not a true representation of society which is what I also stated ie "the vocal minority". The majority wants a return to normal and will go overboard in showing it. In my humble opinion.
 

Jaws31

Well-known member
College football player are at little to no risk of CV-19. Here are some stats I pulled a couple days ago that show unless you are over 70 or living in a nursing home you have little risk.

View attachment 7216
For some people stats and facts don't matter. Buzzwords will get used, testing, asymptomatic, second wave. They don't realize there will never be a cure or a vaccine that will work 100%. It is a RNA virus that is going to be here forever and everyone needs to be exposed. Can not lived in basements forever, especially young, healthy people.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
College football player are at little to no risk of CV-19. Here are some stats I pulled a couple days ago that show unless you are over 70 or living in a nursing home you have little risk.

View attachment 7216
There is indeterminate risk to college football players, not “little to no.” We understand that the physical duress of COVID-19 can lead to respiratory failure inducing cardiac arrest. Obesity is understood to be a comorbidity with COVID-19. How many college football bodies are 300+ lbs, exactly?
 

ghsknightsfan

Well-known member
There is indeterminate risk to college football players, not “little to no.” We understand that the physical duress of COVID-19 can lead to respiratory failure inducing cardiac arrest. Obesity is understood to be a comorbidity with COVID-19. How many college football bodies are 300+ lbs, exactly?
while i get what you’re saying, not many college football players are obese, if any. they’re big, yes, but they play college football for a reason. a lot of muscle and less fat
 

Bad Blake

Member
There is indeterminate risk to college football players, not “little to no.” We understand that the physical duress of COVID-19 can lead to respiratory failure inducing cardiac arrest. Obesity is understood to be a comorbidity with COVID-19. How many college football bodies are 300+ lbs, exactly?
Go watch a college football practice and tell me the linemen are unhealthy. Better yet, tell them!
 
.
Top