Eight grade parents hold your kids back?

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
I suspect this is going to happen across the state more than usual. Some of it may be due to sports while some will be purely academic. Parents that have long debated this decision as their kids struggled in school will feel strength in numbers this Fall if they make that decision.
 
It's looking as if this next school year is a wash. The Gov talking about splitting classes. There's likely that no sports will be played this year. As a former parent of kids that are adults and grown, just a little advice. One year goes like a spec of of time. If I had to eliminate an entire year of athletics from my child's life ,it would be horrible. If this season is finished, because of this plaque, I would certainly allow my son or daughter to repeat their lost experience.,
 
It’s bern done more than once. We call it “The Massillon Redshirt” happens a few times recently with some top Ohio recruits.
 

Jake22

Member
Anyone know if there is a cutoff day to decide. Obviously you can’t do it once school starts. I would imagine there is paperwork that needs time to be processed
 

The Dock

Well-known member
OHSAA eligibility purposes: has to be done by the first scrimmage the student would participate in OR the 15th day of school, whichever comes first. Otherwise, it gets really screwy with how the semester track for athletic eligibility works out for the student. Bylaw 4-3-5
 

EagleFan

Socially Distant, as always
When they made the change, it basically meant you could be held back twice in elementary now and still play sports your Senior year.

My daughter has a summer birthday and we kept her back before Kindergarten, and (we wouldn't) we could hold her back again before high school and she still gets 4 years.
 

bucksman

Moderator
The August 1 went away after a football player at Toledo Central Catholic lost his senior season due to turning 19 before August 1. Player appealed but lost at the time, then OHSAA passed the bylaw change to make the issue go away (after the fact, of course). That's my understanding on the history of it.
 

ohiopup

Well-known member
...

Bylaw 4-2-1 (High School Age Limitation)

Once a student attains the age of 20, the student will no longer be eligible for interscholastic athletic competition notwithstanding where that 20th birthday falls in relation to the sports season.



EXCEPTION 1: If the student is a “child with a disability” as that term is defined within the Ohio Operating Standards for the Education of Children with Disabilities and Part B of the Federal IDEIA requirements and the student’s specific disability was diagnosed contemporaneous with the events which caused the student to be unable to meet the requirements of this bylaw; and whose disability is the primary reason for student’s inability to meet the requirements of this bylaw, that student may be declared eligible by the Executive Director's office if, in the sole discretion of the Executive Director’s office, the Executive Director’s office determines that:

a) the student does not pose a safety risk to himself/herself or others; and
b) the student does not enjoy any advantages in terms of physical maturity, mental maturity or athletic maturity over other student-athletes; and
c) the student would not likely participate in any meaningful way in any contest or otherwise have any impact on the outcome of any contest in which the student does participate; and
d) there is no evidence of “red-shirting” or other indication of academic dishonesty.

To request a ruling for this exception, visit this link: http://www.ohsaa.org/Portals/0/Eligibility/forms/Disability.pdf

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pup note: for those that remember: The above exception rule came about via a Federal Court ruling...
a school was eliminated over an age dispute on a learning disabled player:
The OHSAA had a 'play-in' game.

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SALT
 

JU-ICE

Member
Another interesting question is; if you have kid who is going to be a Senior with a chance to play at the next level, do you send them to live with a relative in a State that is allowing fall sports? Or do you try and move to that State?
 

ohiopup

Well-known member
considerations? (you do not need to answer these)
affordability (your job/their job)
distance
lawyer (you/they - will have to get a legal guardianship document in their state)

:>---

SALT
 
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wls_color

Well-known member
I have a young 8th grade student. April 19th birthday, one of the youngest in his class that will be entering HS in the fall. The thought of holding him back has not even crossed my mind.

What is the reasoning behind doing this? To give him another year of football and baseball? To me, that seems to be the completely wrong focus and sends the wrong message.
 

BobcatQB

Active member
I have a young 8th grade student. April 19th birthday, one of the youngest in his class that will be entering HS in the fall. The thought of holding him back has not even crossed my mind.

What is the reasoning behind doing this? To give him another year of football and baseball? To me, that seems to be the completely wrong focus and sends the wrong message.
Your kid is different from everyone else. Might be the right decision for your kid but not another. I had one late bloomer who's bday was in January, graduated last year. Just finished his 1st year of college baseball..grew 2 inches and gained 15 lbs. Of course the weight gain is from more weight training but 2 inches? Turned down football offers to focus on baseball but also because of his size. One year would have made a huge difference. Wanted to play football.

Some don't mind sending a message about going to school on a full/partial athletic scholarship. What is the ultimate goal? To go to school as cheap as possible while playing within the rules. I don't have a problem with that..same as I don't have a problem with your message to your kid.
 
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Down The Road

Active member
I have a young 8th grade student. April 19th birthday, one of the youngest in his class that will be entering HS in the fall. The thought of holding him back has not even crossed my mind.

What is the reasoning behind doing this? To give him another year of football and baseball? To me, that seems to be the completely wrong focus and sends the wrong message.
It's about sports but not just those things. Normalcy, getting to do things that only happen in high school and doing them when and how they should happen. It's also bigger picture long term what is the world like these kids graduate into? If it's feasible to give them another year in a stable environment and let the national and world economy heal a little more (along with college opportunities opening back up) doing it over an extra year is not a bad idea. Sports or not for the reasoning next school year could be screwed up and if you don't have to why do that?

BTW Tiffany is right!
 

wls_color

Well-known member
Your kid is different from everyone else. Might be the right decision for your kid but not another. I had one late bloomer who's bday was in January, graduated last year. Just finished his 1st year of college baseball..grew 2 inches and gained 15 lbs. Of course the weight gain is from more weight training but 2 inches? Turned down football offers to focus on baseball but also because of his size. One year would have made a huge difference. Wanted to play football.

Some don't mind sending a message about going to school on a full/partial athletic scholarship. What is the ultimate goal? To go to school as cheap as possible while playing within the rules. I don't have a problem with that..same as I don't have a problem with your message to your kid.
I certainly would love for my children to get a scholarship to college - but I would be more proud of them for doing so academically. I get that some kids are late bloomers, but I don't believe that athletics should drive decisions like this. Now I'm small school, rural Ohio. And a very small percentage of our athletes get athletic scholarships to college; I understand it's different at St. Ignatius, Colerain, Wayne, St. X, etc. But I believe holding any child back for pure athletic reasoning sends the complete wrong message to the child and gives them an incorrect perspective on life.

I know this has happened in the past and I'm sure there are legitimate reasons in many cases. But to do it because there is a chance a child may not get 4 years of HS sports seems like a poor decision (in my opinion).
 

ghsknightsfan

Well-known member
I have a young 8th grade student. April 19th birthday, one of the youngest in his class that will be entering HS in the fall. The thought of holding him back has not even crossed my mind.

What is the reasoning behind doing this? To give him another year of football and baseball? To me, that seems to be the completely wrong focus and sends the wrong message.
my grandsons birthday is in July and he is one of the oldest in the class. he could be graduating now but we would have rather him be one of the oldest in the grade than the youngest. don’t regret that decision one bit. he didn’t get an extra year of sports, we still started him with football in the 2nd grade when it was allowed
 
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