When the OHSAA = the NCAA

4GX

Well-known member
So Yappi posted (in another thread) a summary of new Ohio state legislation— including the bill that allows Ohio ”collegiate” players to be paid for their Name, Image, and Likeness (NIL)— but specifically prohibits high school players from reaping the same benefit— although the legislative summary that Yappi posted indicated that the OHSAA (seeing the writing on the wall) is going to consider by-law changes in this area and put it to OHSAA members for a vote some time in 2022— here is the relevant passage from Yappi’s post elsewhere:

Within House Bill 110 (“the budget bill”), language was added in Sec. 3376.03 to allow college athletes to earn compensation as a result of the use of the student's name, image, or likeness. This has no impact on students participating in interscholastic athletics at the high school level, therefore OHSAA Bylaw 4-10, which is the OHSAA Amateurism bylaw, is still in effect, but it is being reviewed for potential modifications that would go to the membership for a vote during the 2022 referendum cycle.

When one recognizes that the Supreme Court’s recent decision (most sharply articulated by Justice Kavanaugh) is that scholastic organizations have no legal right to insist on amateurism as a condition of participation in scholastic sports, it is readily evident that the same massive change which has just come down on the NCAA IIke a ton of bricks is soon to be in force in high school sports.

In this New World Order, many top athletes (perhaps MOST of them) will now gravitate to the school that can pay them the most (for their “NIL”)— and the restrictions on what one can be paid for (and how much) are also NIL! So, all of you who were eager to see the NCAA’s restrictions/requirements on amateurism abolished may have a different thought, when you realize that (soon) the HS sports landscape will be dominated (in EVERY sport) by a relative handful of IMG and Oak Hill type magnet programs— that pay the most money, and sign virtually ALL of the top players— in EVERY SPORT.

In this Brave New World, LeBron James would NEVER have attended Akron St. Vincent/St. Mary— because there is NO WAY that SVSM could EVER have offered him top dollar for his services. The same goes for Chris Spielman— he likely never would have stayed (semi)local to attend Massillon— there are too many other schools, with FAR deeper pockets, that would have recruited him away, to the dismay of Tiger fans.

If state boundaries are observed, for competition, then it would be prescient to figure out which Ohio high schools likely have the deepest pockets (which really means: “Which high schools have the richest alumni, in aggregate”)— because those schools are going to be able to buy more of the best players than all the others… I think I already know the answer to this $64 Million Question— but I’d be curious to see what others here think are likely the richest high schools in Ohio.
 

Dayride

Active member
In this New World Order, many top athletes (perhaps MOST of them) will now gravitate to the school that can pay them the most (for their “NIL”)— and the restrictions on what one can be paid for (and how much) are also NIL! So, all of you who were eager to see the NCAA’s restrictions/requirements on amateurism abolished may have a different thought, when you realize that (soon) the HS sports landscape will be dominated (in EVERY sport) by a relative handful of IMG and Oak Hill type magnet programs— that pay the most money, and sign virtually ALL of the top players— in EVERY SPORT.

In this Brave New World, LeBron James would NEVER have attended Akron St. Vincent/St. Mary— because there is NO WAY that SVSM could EVER have offered him top dollar for his services. The same goes for Chris Spielman— he likely never would have stayed (semi)local to attend Massillon— there are too many other schools, with FAR deeper pockets, that would have recruited him away, to the dismay of Tiger fans.

If state boundaries are observed, for competition, then it would be prescient to figure out which Ohio high schools likely have the deepest pockets (which really means: “Which high schools have the richest alumni, in aggregate”)— because those schools are going to be able to buy more of the best players than all the others… I think I already know the answer to this $64 Million Question— but I’d be curious to see what others here think are likely the richest high schools in Ohio.
The schools themselves don't pay the athletes. Right now many of the top players already go to certain schools like an IMG or even a Moeller for whatever reason. The on field product at almost all local high schools will be the same. Now the article below is more likely to start happening, but once again it will a few kids each year not every 5 star in the country.

 

4GX

Well-known member
The schools themselves don't pay the athletes. Right now many of the top players already go to certain schools like an IMG or even a Moeller for whatever reason. The on field product at almost all local high schools will be the same. Now the article below is more likely to start happening, but once again it will a few kids each year not every 5 star in the country.

The (ostensible) condition that the schools themselves do not DIRECTLY pay the players has ALREADY been proven to be a distinction without a difference (Alabama’s new starting QB does NOT care that his million dollar+ endorsement package is NOT being paid to him directly by his school)— it will be affiliated businesses and wealthy alumni that will pay players to come to their preferred school to play— for anything and everything. The Ohio State tackle who just got a brand-new Chevy 4x4 Silverado pickup from Columbus Wahlberg Chevrolet does NOT CARE that it is NOT Ohio State who just paid him— and DON’T think for a minute that Ohio State can’t figure out how to arrange such things.

That kid in your story, Quinn Ewer, COULD have been the test case to force the coming change at the HS level— he just decided he’d rather jump to Ohio State a year early (and get paid MORE there) than fight with the Texas equivalent of the OHSAA for a year or more, over whether he would be allowed to earn NIL compensation in HS…

Nothing you posted changes what I‘ve predicted— it’s coming— get used to it— now, what is it going to look like, when it gets here?
 

serpico

Well-known member
when you realize that (soon) the HS sports landscape will be dominated (in EVERY sport) by a relative handful of IMG and Oak Hill type magnet programs— that pay the most money, and sign virtually ALL of the top players— in EVERY SPORT.

Let’s imagine this for a second…

All these top players in every sport - do you really think there’s money out there for them? Say an imaginary Oak Hill clone signs the top ten boys basketball players in the state - who’s going to be throwing money at the last two guys off the bench? Who’s going to pay big money to a high school player that doesn’t even see the court? And how high profile do you think these teams even are? They’re going to be quasi All Star teams that won’t get much of a following other than jock sniffers because there’s no community behind these teams.

Count me as not worried. I’ll continue to watch my local team play other local teams in front of big crowds on Friday nights - with or without ‘elite prospects’.
 

4GX

Well-known member
Let’s imagine this for a second…

All these top players in every sport - do you really think there’s money out there for them? Say an imaginary Oak Hill clone signs the top ten boys basketball players in the state - who’s going to be throwing money at the last two guys off the bench? Who’s going to pay big money to a high school player that doesn’t even see the court? And how high profile do you think these teams even are? They’re going to be quasi All Star teams that won’t get much of a following other than jock sniffers because there’s no community behind these teams.

Count me as not worried. I’ll continue to watch my local team play other local teams in front of big crowds on Friday nights - with or without ‘elite prospects’.
Well, you're certainly welcome to your opinion ("What, me worry?)... meanwhile, the players that HS coaches get into arguments about (alleging "recruiting") are going to be getting offers to play for one school or another. It may not be the kind of money that LeBron would have been offered (probably WAS offered-- and paid), but it will be the difference between a kid staying at his local HS and going to the "magnet" program that makes him the best offer.-- and it will all be out in the open, above-board, and legal, under the new rules.. and those magnets will dominate all of the state tournaments. The money will come primarily from alums.

Rural Podunk High is going to have a REALLY tough time keeping anybody with any ability-- and a desire to be rewarded immediately for that talent.

If you think X, Massillon, Ig, and other large (and deep-pocketed) schools don't have big fan followings, you've not been to one of their games lately-- NO ONE has a following like they used to have-- attendance at Ohio HS athletics (really at athletics across the country) has fallen on hard times-- but still, compared to the rural local school, there really IS no comparison.
 

Dayride

Active member
The (ostensible) condition that the schools themselves do not DIRECTLY pay the players has ALREADY been proven to be a distinction without a difference (Alabama’s new starting QB does NOT care that his million dollar+ endorsement package is NOT being paid to him directly by his school)— it will be affiliated businesses and wealthy alumni that will pay players to come to their preferred school to play— for anything and everything. The Ohio State tackle who just got a brand-new Chevy 4x4 Silverado pickup from Columbus Wahlberg Chevrolet does NOT CARE that it is NOT Ohio State who just paid him— and DON’T think for a minute that Ohio State can’t figure out how to arrange such things.

That kid in your story, Quinn Ewer, COULD have been the test case to force the coming change at the HS level— he just decided he’d rather jump to Ohio State a year early (and get paid MORE there) than fight with the Texas equivalent of the OHSAA for a year or more, over whether he would be allowed to earn NIL compensation in HS…

Nothing you posted changes what I‘ve predicted— it’s coming— get used to it— now, what is it going to look like, when it gets here?
Years ago they were saying open enrollment will kill high school sports with a great divide between the haves and the have nots.

Right now there are about 15 4 star and above recruits in the whole state for the class of 2022 2 schools (Wayne/Lakota West) have more than one kid ranked that high. I would assume IMG would not want anyone less than a 4 star. So losing 15 kids out of 1360 high schools would not make a dent in the high school landscape in Ohio. Even if they all went to an Ohio school that team would dominate and it would not be any different than the last 50 years where most of the same schools win championships (Iggy, Moeller, LaSalle, Coldwater)

By the way, I think you need to get your keyboard checked it seems to go in to CAPS LOCK sporadically,
 

4GX

Well-known member
Years ago they were saying open enrollment will kill high school sports with a great divide between the haves and the have nots.

Right now there are about 15 4 star and above recruits in the whole state for the class of 2022 2 schools (Wayne/Lakota West) have more than one kid ranked that high. I would assume IMG would not want anyone less than a 4 star. So losing 15 kids out of 1360 high schools would not make a dent in the high school landscape in Ohio. Even if they all went to an Ohio school that team would dominate and it would not be any different than the last 50 years where most of the same schools win championships (Iggy, Moeller, LaSalle, Coldwater)

By the way, I think you need to get your keyboard checked it seems to go in to CAPS LOCK sporadically,
Open enrollment is a non-relevant example for what is going to happen in HS sports, once NIL-compensated HS players become the norm— open enrollment schools are (by and large) struggling both academically and financially (that‘s usually WHY they have moved to open enrollment)— and are rarely any good athletically either. There is/was NO attraction for players to gravitate to these struggling open enrollment schools.

You have identified the forecast (in your second scenario) which best describes what is going to happen in Ohio, in my opinion— a few top recruits (in ALL sports) will get scavenged away from Ohio to much richer (and higher profile) schools (really minor league teams)— but that is NOT the primary change that will be coming to Ohio HS sports— it’s the latter scenario, with a few Ohio teams vacuuming up the best mid- to upper-level prospects, that will change Ohio HS athletics forever— they’ll mostly not be getting the so-called 5-star and 4-star recruits— those might well go out of state to national level minor league (high school) pro teams— but the 3-star, 2-star, and 1-star rated players, who make up a good bit of the starting rosters of most current Ohio Division I championship level teams— they will gravitate to ~25 schools in the state, to “pay for play” on a lower level than the national programs— think of it like Triple-A Minor League baseball vs. Single-A.

But it WON’T be all the same Ohio teams that dominate in this Brave New World— it will be those with the wealthiest (and most zealous) alumni— schools like Mentor, Mason, Centerville, and even (I’ll assume an eye roll here) Shaker Heights, Mariemont, and Ottawa Hills will have a BIG leg up (if they so choose) on schools like Coldwater, MSML, Pickerington, Huber Heights Wayne— the players will go where the money is— and that means going where the wealthiest alumni (and affiliated businesses) are…

LaSalle has only had any playoff success at all for (less than) the last 10 years (when LaSalle moved down to Division II)— and that will be a thing of the past, in this New World Order— LaSalle is not a wealthy school, by any stretch of the imagination.

Ig, however, is going to see a new golden era— and Moeller MIGHT be able to join them— if enough wealthy Moeller alums (e.g- Ken Griffey Jr., Barry Larkin, etc.) decide to support that cause— but Moeller‘s alumni can’t hold a candle to Ig’s, when you consider the aggregate Alumni base.

By the way, I had my caps lock key checked— it seems to engage PRECISELY when I want it to.
 

Just.here

Well-known member
Open enrollment is a non-relevant example for what is going to happen in HS sports, once NIL-compensated HS players become the norm— open enrollment schools are (by and large) struggling both academically and financially (that‘s usually WHY they have moved to open enrollment)— and are rarely any good athletically either. There is/was NO attraction for players to gravitate to these struggling open enrollment schools.

You have identified the forecast (in your second scenario) which best describes what is going to happen in Ohio, in my opinion— a few top recruits (in ALL sports) will get scavenged away from Ohio to much richer (and higher profile) schools (really minor league teams)— but that is NOT the primary change that will be coming to Ohio HS sports— it’s the latter scenario, with a few Ohio teams vacuuming up the best mid- to upper-level prospects, that will change Ohio HS athletics forever— they’ll mostly not be getting the so-called 5-star and 4-star recruits— those might well go out of state to national level minor league (high school) pro teams— but the 3-star, 2-star, and 1-star rated players, who make up a good bit of the starting rosters of most current Ohio Division I championship level teams— they will gravitate to ~25 schools in the state, to “pay for play” on a lower level than the national programs— think of it like Triple-A Minor League baseball vs. Single-A.

But it WON’T be all the same Ohio teams that dominate in this Brave New World— it will be those with the wealthiest (and most zealous) alumni— schools like Mentor, Mason, Centerville, and even (I’ll assume an eye roll here) Shaker Heights, Mariemont, and Ottawa Hills will have a BIG leg up (if they so choose) on schools like Coldwater, MSML, Pickerington, Huber Heights Wayne— the players will go where the money is— and that means going where the wealthiest alumni (and affiliated businesses) are…

LaSalle has only had any playoff success at all for (less than) the last 10 years (when LaSalle moved down to Division II)— and that will be a thing of the past, in this New World Order— LaSalle is not a wealthy school, by any stretch of the imagination.

Ig, however, is going to see a new golden era— and Moeller MIGHT be able to join them— if enough wealthy Moeller alums (e.g- Ken Griffey Jr., Barry Larkin, etc.) decide to support that cause— but Moeller‘s alumni can’t hold a candle to Ig’s, when you consider the aggregate Alumni base.

By the way, I had my caps lock key checked— it seems to engage PRECISELY when I want it to.
So you’re saying that it’ll hurt the majority of schools. But you believe that the majority of schools, that know they are going to be hurt by it, are going to vote yes on new NIL rules?
 

4GX

Well-known member
So you’re saying that it’ll hurt the majority of schools. But you believe that the majority of schools, that know they are going to be hurt by it, are going to vote yes on new NIL rules?
No— they will ABSOLUTELY vote “NO” on such a change— just as the vast majority (really ALL) of the NCAA members voted ”NO” on NIL payments to ”college” athletes— but it won’t matter— this US Supreme Court decision is like the Terminator— it doesn’t care about your traditions and your legacies, it doesn’t care about what you or your fellow member schools want, it won’t stop until it has eliminated the (artificial) restriction of amateurism in scholastic sports environments. In other words, the OHSAA‘s schools will most definitely TRY to stop this from coming in— but someone like a LeBron James or a Maurice Clarett is going to demand to be paid what he can earn (in High School)— and he will go to court— and he will WIN— it’s pre-ordained, based on the US Supreme Court’s decision— and then, the OHSAA will have to throw in the towel— just as the NCAA has now.
 

Just.here

Well-known member
No— they will ABSOLUTELY vote “NO” on such a change— just as the vast majority (really ALL) of the NCAA members voted ”NO” on NIL payments to ”college” athletes— but it won’t matter— this US Supreme Court decision is like the Terminator— it doesn’t care about your traditions and your legacies, it doesn’t care about what you or your fellow member schools want, it won’t stop until it has eliminated the (artificial) restriction of amateurism in scholastic sports environments. In other words, the OHSAA‘s schools will most definitely TRY to stop this from coming in— but someone like a LeBron James or a Maurice Clarett is going to demand to be paid what he can earn (in High School)— and he will go to court— and he will WIN— it’s pre-ordained, based on the US Supreme Court’s decision— and then, the OHSAA will have to throw in the towel— just as the NCAA has now.
An extra curricular activity at any high school does not bring in the same amount of revenue as college football. The SCOTUS, knowing that, would not rule that they deserve any compensation.
Not sure why you hate the Supreme Court so much, but lucky for you they give you the right to go off like this.
 
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L Hand

Well-known member
Nothing to see here. NIL is overblown in college as to how many athletes are even capable of earning something based upon their "fame" - high school is a minute fraction of that. Are there exceptions? Yes- there are to every rule. They are almost all male basketball players and Tiger and they are very, very, very few and far between.
 

4GX

Well-known member
An extra curricular activity at any high school does not bring in the same amount of revenue as college football. The SCOTUS, knowing that, would not rule that they deserve any compensation.
Not sure why you hate the Supreme Court so much, but lucky for you they give you the right to go off like this.
I think you are wrong about revenue mattering— it is NOT a matter of the amount of money brought in— the Supreme Court’s decision has to do with the principle of “amateurism” being enforced in scholastic sports environments— that is what has been found to be illegal (especially if that scholastic organization is perceived, in the opinion of the Court, to have a “monopoly” on competition at that level— which is MOST CERTAINLY what the OHSAA— and pretty much all other state high school athletic associations— have).

So, your argument that the money is smaller in HS, thus the decision does not apply to high school sports does not hold any water; that argument does not comport with the Supreme Court’s legal decision— it was not about HOW MUCH money colleges were taking in— it was that colleges (or more accurately, coaches) were being paid— while the athletes were not allowed to be paid. The SAME is true in high schools— it will be a lower level of money involved, but the principle is the same—and the Court’s decision will apply just the same.

I don‘t hate the Supreme Court at all— I just think this was a misguided decision (and I’m ashamed that the key proponent of it is a former athlete and graduate of a Jesuit HS). I think it was wrong, because I do NOT agree that the NCAA is a monopoly— thus I do not agree that the NCAA’s amateurism requirement was an anti-trust violation (as the Supreme Court claimed that it was).

BTW, the Supreme Court does NOT give me the right to “go off like this” (whatever THAT means)— it is the Constitution (and the Founding Fathers who wrote a 1st Amendment to that Constitution) who gave me this right— the Supreme Court is nothing more than the interpreter/caretaker of that right.
 

4GX

Well-known member
Nothing to see here. NIL is overblown in college as to how many athletes are even capable of earning something based upon their "fame" - high school is a minute fraction of that. Are there exceptions? Yes- there are to every rule. They are almost all male basketball players and Tiger and they are very, very, very few and far between.
This opinion will rapidly be proven wrong. Alabama’s QB is the poster child— but the Ohio State lineman sporting the new $50,000+ Silverado given to him by Columbus Wahlberg Chevrolet is equally indicative that this will be widespread— and that a free-for-all arms race is ALREADY under way. Plenty to see here— none of it good.
 

Omar

Well-known member
This opinion will rapidly be proven wrong. Alabama’s QB is the poster child— but the Ohio State lineman sporting the new $50,000+ Silverado given to him by Columbus Wahlberg Chevrolet is equally indicative that this will be widespread— and that a free-for-all arms race is ALREADY under way. Plenty to see here— none of it good.
Again, you’re talking about a college player. And eventually, the NCAA is going to have some compliance framework in place to limit the earnings of players.
 

Omar

Well-known member
Nothing to see here. NIL is overblown in college as to how many athletes are even capable of earning something based upon their "fame" - high school is a minute fraction of that. Are there exceptions? Yes- there are to every rule. They are almost all male basketball players and Tiger and they are very, very, very few and far between.
Ewers is definitely an exception and anyone who thinks it was for NIL $, needs to think again. South lake is a very well off suburb, his family isn’t hurting for $. He bolted to get into the NFL as early as possible.
 

L Hand

Well-known member
This opinion will rapidly be proven wrong. Alabama’s QB is the poster child— but the Ohio State lineman sporting the new $50,000+ Silverado given to him by Columbus Wahlberg Chevrolet is equally indicative that this will be widespread— and that a free-for-all arms race is ALREADY under way. Plenty to see here— none of it good.
Uhh, not arguing that the Alabama QB (and many other Alabama players) or the OSU lineman (and many other OSU players) aren't the people that constitute the MINORITY of college athletes (ALL college athletes) that will benefit, tremendously, by this new rule. But thanks for supporting my point.
 

Just.here

Well-known member
I think you are wrong about revenue mattering— it is NOT a matter of the amount of money brought in— the Supreme Court’s decision has to do with the principle of “amateurism” being enforced in scholastic sports environments— that is what has been found to be illegal (especially if that scholastic organization is perceived, in the opinion of the Court, to have a “monopoly” on competition at that level— which is MOST CERTAINLY what the OHSAA— and pretty much all other state high school athletic associations— have).

So, your argument that the money is smaller in HS, thus the decision does not apply to high school sports does not hold any water; that argument does not comport with the Supreme Court’s legal decision— it was not about HOW MUCH money colleges were taking in— it was that colleges (or more accurately, coaches) were being paid— while the athletes were not allowed to be paid. The SAME is true in high schools— it will be a lower level of money involved, but the principle is the same—and the Court’s decision will apply just the same.

I don‘t hate the Supreme Court at all— I just think this was a misguided decision (and I’m ashamed that the key proponent of it is a former athlete and graduate of a Jesuit HS). I think it was wrong, because I do NOT agree that the NCAA is a monopoly— thus I do not agree that the NCAA’s amateurism requirement was an anti-trust violation (as the Supreme Court claimed that it was).

BTW, the Supreme Court does NOT give me the right to “go off like this” (whatever THAT means)— it is the Constitution (and the Founding Fathers who wrote a 1st Amendment to that Constitution) who gave me this right— the Supreme Court is nothing more than the interpreter/caretaker of that right.
Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh, who I’m sure you supportted whole heartedly when he was brought in, let us all know it was about the athletes receiving a fair market wage. The fair market wage of a high school athlete is and always will be 0 unless it’s a Quinn Ewers type who is doing things the appropriate way.

And try to keep up with how people talk in 2021 ya boomer 😉
Or at least knowing the SCOTUS does rule on free speech cases
 

Dayride

Active member
Some of the schools you mention don't even have their own football stadiums. If these rich alumni are not even donating enough money to build something they could put their name on, they are not kicking in money to have Joe 5 star come to their school. Hell most schools have their people out there selling 50/50 tickets. You cant tell me Ken Griffey Jr cant afford to donate the total amount of the 50/50 for every home football game to Moeller? He can but he does not and I am pretty sure he is not going to give money so some kid will go to his former high school.

Like someone said above there is no real return in investment. Maybe for a Lebron it might have been worth it he was nationally known on the cover of SI etc... Say this year's top recruit CJ Hicks is on TV trying to sell a car while in high school. I would guess 90% of the people in the Dayton area will have no idea who he is. Even the casual Buckeye fan will not know who he is until he steps on the field at OSU his first Saturday.
 

playboi12

Well-known member
Some of the schools you mention don't even have their own football stadiums. If these rich alumni are not even donating enough money to build something they could put their name on, they are not kicking in money to have Joe 5 star come to their school. Hell most schools have their people out there selling 50/50 tickets. You cant tell me Ken Griffey Jr cant afford to donate the total amount of the 50/50 for every home football game to Moeller? He can but he does not and I am pretty sure he is not going to give money so some kid will go to his former high school.

Like someone said above there is no real return in investment. Maybe for a Lebron it might have been worth it he was nationally known on the cover of SI etc... Say this year's top recruit CJ Hicks is on TV trying to sell a car while in high school. I would guess 90% of the people in the Dayton area will have no idea who he is. Even the casual Buckeye fan will not know who he is until he steps on the field at OSU his first Saturday.
That is true. Id say about 95 percent of people in Dayton could not pick Hicks out of a lineup. At the end of the day, this is still just an after school activity.
 

queencitybuckeye

Well-known member
Worst case is a few rich programs dominate a couple of divisions. Everyone else gets back to the idea that state titles aren't what the sport is about.
 

4GX

Well-known member
Ewers is definitely an exception and anyone who thinks it was for NIL $, needs to think again. South lake is a very well off suburb, his family isn’t hurting for $. He bolted to get into the NFL as early as possible.
The idea that this kid Ewers is rich enough that he would just turn his back on (quite possibly) the >$100K he could be earning this year, had Texas not tried to enforce its ban on NIL payments to HS players is ludicrous; he is NOT that rich. He left to get paid immediately-- not (primarily) to get to the NFL quicker-- his words in print said one thing-- but all the newspaper reports in Texas said that the NIL decision was the prompt for him to re-classify and move.
 
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4GX

Well-known member
Uhh, not arguing that the Alabama QB (and many other Alabama players) or the OSU lineman (and many other OSU players) aren't the people that constitute the MINORITY of college athletes (ALL college athletes) that will benefit, tremendously, by this new rule. But thanks for supporting my point.
NO support of your point-- because your "point" is invalid.
 

Omar

Well-known member
The idea that this kid Ewers is rich enough that he would just turn his back on (quite possibly) the >$100K he could be earning this year, had Texas not tried to enforce its ban on NIL payments to HS players is ludicrous; he is NOT that rich. He left to get paid immediately-- not (primarily) to get to the NFL quicker-- his words in print said one thing-- but all the newspaper reports in Texas said that the NIL decision was the prompt for him to re-classify and move.
I mean, yeah, Southlake is a pretty affluent suburb. He might not be making $ but his family isn’t hurting financially.
 

4GX

Well-known member
Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh, who I’m sure you supportted whole heartedly when he was brought in, let us all know it was about the athletes receiving a fair market wage. The fair market wage of a high school athlete is and always will be 0 unless it’s a Quinn Ewers type who is doing things the appropriate way.

And try to keep up with how people talk in 2021 ya boomer 😉
Or at least knowing the SCOTUS does rule on free speech cases
The market is going to rapidly show itself to by much higher than you think, for HS players. There are tens of thousands of kids who will get degrees of what Ewers could have gotten-- had Texas not blocked him (for the time being).

I don't know what the heck the rest of your post means or is referencing... I did support Kavanaugh-- as an eminently qualified Federal judge, with a long and distinguished track record on what is (effectively) the second highest court in the land-- but, Yes, I am also tremendously disappointed in this decision-- and the concurrent opinion that he wrote for it.
 

4GX

Well-known member
Some of the schools you mention don't even have their own football stadiums. If these rich alumni are not even donating enough money to build something they could put their name on, they are not kicking in money to have Joe 5 star come to their school. Hell most schools have their people out there selling 50/50 tickets. You cant tell me Ken Griffey Jr cant afford to donate the total amount of the 50/50 for every home football game to Moeller? He can but he does not and I am pretty sure he is not going to give money so some kid will go to his former high school.

Like someone said above there is no real return in investment. Maybe for a Lebron it might have been worth it he was nationally known on the cover of SI etc... Say this year's top recruit CJ Hicks is on TV trying to sell a car while in high school. I would guess 90% of the people in the Dayton area will have no idea who he is. Even the casual Buckeye fan will not know who he is until he steps on the field at OSU his first Saturday.
It's not going to depend on a "return on investment"-- it will devolve to wealthy, zealous alums (and closely affiliated businesses) who want to see their preferred school do well, to fund these payments-- and they will. Columbus Wahlberg Chevrolet is NEVER going to get any reasonable return on their gift of a fully loaded Silverado to a relatively anonymous defensive end named Jack Dawson-- the dealership (and/or whomever runs it) did NOT do it to make a return on investment (though that would be a nice ancillary benefit)-- they did it to ensure that Dawson wants to continue playing for OSU (and not transfer somewhere else)-- and others like him will want to come to OSU, as well.
 

4GX

Well-known member
That is true. Id say about 95 percent of people in Dayton could not pick Hicks out of a lineup. At the end of the day, this is still just an after school activity.
Doesn't matter-- Hicks will get paid-- to ensure more like him follow him to OSU.
 

4GX

Well-known member
Worst case is a few rich programs dominate a couple of divisions. Everyone else gets back to the idea that state titles aren't what the sport is about.
You are right-- but there could easily be enough of these "rich" programs to completely re-order the dominance hierarchy in all seven Ohio divisions... look for tiny (but rich) schools (like Mariemont and Seven Hills) to suddenly emerge with some of the very best athletes in the state-- and it won't take many to dominate at Division VI or VII football.
 

4GX

Well-known member
I mean, yeah, Southlake is a pretty affluent suburb. He might not be making $ but his family isn’t hurting financially.
He didn't do it (and most won't do it) because "his family is hurting financially"-- he did it because he COULD-- this isn't the old 1970's NBA draft, with Spencer Haywood declaring for the "hardship draft" because "he had to take care of his family"-- no one even bothers with that pretense any more. People opt for more money (9 times out of 10) because they CAN.
 

Omar

Well-known member
He didn't do it (and most won't do it) because "his family is hurting financially"-- he did it because he COULD-- this isn't the old 1970's NBA draft, with Spencer Haywood declaring for the "hardship draft" because "he had to take care of his family"-- no one even bothers with that pretense any more. People opt for more money (9 times out of 10) because they CAN.
And how many other country are truly capable of doing this? Again, you’re bent out of shape over nothing.
 

queencitybuckeye

Well-known member
You are right-- but there could easily be enough of these "rich" programs to completely re-order the dominance hierarchy in all seven Ohio divisions... look for tiny (but rich) schools (like Mariemont and Seven Hills) to suddenly emerge with some of the very best athletes in the state-- and it won't take many to dominate at Division VI or VII football.
Possibly, but I always try to remember that the lessons that are important in life were taught to me just as much in our 2-8 season as in our 9-1 season.
 
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