Tie Declared!!!!

tom 48

Active member
Horrible decision. One team comes out on the ice, the other stays in the locker room, not coming out, and a tie is declared? What a terrible way to end it.
 

tom 48

Active member
Well, we don't know if SN not coming out means that they wanted this outcome.
Probably they told officials that they couldn't take it anymore , and the state officials, thinking that the game was a classic, decided that no team deserved to lose and could not declare a forfeit. Or, they knew that the game was going to be a tie and the officials neglected to inform Ignatius.
 

CatAlum

Active member
Probably they told officials that they couldn't take it anymore , and the state officials, thinking that the game was a classic, decided that no team deserved to lose and could not declare a forfeit. Or, they knew that the game was going to be a tie and the officials neglected to inform Ignatius.
Speculation.

Thinking about it...if they were heading in this direction, they should have notified the teams...this will be the last overtime.
 

CatAlum

Active member
I have been told both coaches were concerned about the health and safety of the players.
If you are reading the Eddie Dwyer article (which says that)...well, at this point, PR takes over. I'll find out the real story from the hockey dads on Monday.
 

mailman112

Active member
Cat I received a text from someone in the arena. That's what is being spread in the arena. However, I believe it has something to do with STO. Just me thinking out loud.
 

E.S. Furgeson

New member
No way on STO. The game was tape delayed. They could have skipped ahead, cut out portions, done whatever they needed to do.

CatAlum, I worry that only hearing from Ignatius "hockey dads" will result in a somewhat biased conclusion.

I wonder what would have been wrong with announcing a 45 minute "hydration break" with a 15 minute warm up period. Whatever the case, this is somewhat unprecedented.
 

mailman112

Active member
I highly doubt both teams agreed. Ignatius came out to play the 8th ot.

After seven overtime periods, hockey coaches from St. Ignatius and Sylvania Northview agreed to share the state title as the OHSAA final ended in a 1-1 tie on Saturday at Nationwide Arena.

Ohio High School Athletic Association commissioner Dan Ross announced the decision prior to what would have been the eighth overtime period, citing player safety as a reason. The decision came much to the displeasure of fans and players as the crowd began to boo and began chants of "Let them play!" as well as others.

St. Ignatius players threw down their equipment before lining up to shake hands with their opponents.

The game holds the distinction of being the second-longest in the history of the OHSAA, and the longest playoff game.

The longest game was between Aurora and Solon on Feb. 18, 2007 and went to eight overtimes.

This post will be updated with reaction, a slideshow and a video.

St. Ignatius outshot Northview, 37-20, in regulation and continued to be the aggressors on offense in overtime. Northview was only credited with 12 shots on goal through the seven overtime periods while St. Ignatius added another 42 to the team's total during that same time for a total of 78 on the day.

Northview goalie David Marsh set a record for most saves in a state final with 77. St. Ignatius goalie Dylan McKeon saved 31 of 32 shots he faced.

Both teams got off eight shots on goal in the opening period but only Northview found the back of the net with one.

Jake Koback scored with 8:18 to play in the first to give Northview an early lead. Cody Estrel and Josh Koback assisted on the score.

St. Ignatius outshot Northview in the second frame, 11-4, but still did not make a dent on the scoreboard.

Both teams showed aggression on offense in the second period, working the puck in toward the crease where both Wildcats' defenses were equally efficient in neutralizing scoring opportunities.

With 7:45 left in regulation, St. Ignatius' offensive persistence paid off.

After having his shot deflected, Beck Schultz got his own rebound and guided the puck around the backside of the Northview net. He found Danny Brogan with a well-placed pass and Brogan knocked in the game-tying goal.

The game nearly ended in the fifth extra frame when two consecutive shots by St. Ignatius players clanked against the crossbar of the Northview goal but skipped off.
 

atthemike

New member
What was the scenerio in overtime?

Did the teams play 15 minute overtime periods? With a break for cleaning the ice between OT's?

If so, you're talking about 150 minutes of play for a high school kid. Equaling 3 1/3 games played in one game here. That's insane! Heck if you're talking about a pro game, it would equal playing 2 1/2 games in the NHL!

I know some won't be happy with the decision, BUT it will bring to the attention of the OHSAA the possibility of modifying the overtime rules to decide the outcome of playoff games. You can't expect kids to go on for hours playing a very demanding sport...I'd suggest ONE full overtime period, and if you can't decide the game in 15 minutes, take a 5 minute break and hold a shootout.
 

TolCentralCath

New member
Sylvania Northview did NOT want this game to end in a tie. Their players and their coach wanted to keep playing. Athletic Directors from BOTH schools and the OHSAA commissioner decided it was best to end the game in a tie.
 

CatAlum

Active member
I'm satisfied after watching O'Rourke's interview on Cleveland.com. He said he was pulled aside just as Ignatius was going out for OT # 8. They talked about either ending it or having up to two more OT's. He mentioned that it was approaching the longest high school hockey game ever and there was a mutual agreement to end it right there.
 

bigmac27

New member
Did the teams play 15 minute overtime periods? With a break for cleaning the ice between OT's?

If so, you're talking about 150 minutes of play for a high school kid. Equaling 3 1/3 games played in one game here. That's insane! Heck if you're talking about a pro game, it would equal playing 2 1/2 games in the NHL!

I know some won't be happy with the decision, BUT it will bring to the attention of the OHSAA the possibility of modifying the overtime rules to decide the outcome of playoff games. You can't expect kids to go on for hours playing a very demanding sport...I'd suggest ONE full overtime period, and if you can't decide the game in 15 minutes, take a 5 minute break and hold a shootout.
They are kids you can expect them to be able to go hours. You wouldn't expect a 50 year old to. Kids are resilient let em play. Extend the intermission if you must but let em play. Quit softening this world!
 

EaglePride01

Active member
Unbelievable indeed. I wonder if the OHSAA will consider shootouts going forward, perhaps after a designated number of overtime periods.

Anyways, both goalies should be commended on their efforts tonight, especially David Marsh of Northview. Sounds like he was under some serious fire from the Ignatius offense.
 

EagleFan

Controller
This was not an allstar game. Should have gone on, skated 4 on 4 or 3 on 3, or postponed. Ties on state titles are more a track/swimming thing. Don't like it.
 

other1

New member
I don't follow high school hockey very much, but I'm surprised by this result.

Soccer has rules for just such a situation. Whether they are entirely appropriate for hockey, I can't say, but they do avoid this situation.

Soccer plays two 40-minute halves. If tied after regulation, the teams play two 15-minute golden goal overtime periods. Golden goal means a goal by either team wins the game. If still tied after the overtime periods, a penalty kick shootout ensues. There are standard rules for the shootout which guarantees a winner.

Most recently, in 2009, Gahanna Lincoln (with Wil Trapp, now starting for the Columbus Crew) defeated St. Ignatius in a shootout to win the state D1 championship.

Most soccer purists do not like the sudden death shoot out, but everyone knows the rules and lives by them. As you can imagine, strategy can play into games that might have this situation. Some coaches may actually point toward the shootout, thinking that is their best shot at winning the game.
 

y2h

Well-known member
What a farce. More embarrassing than Bud gate in the All Star game a few years ago. If we have a basketball game go 4 or 5 OTs in the next couple weeks will that be called a tie also?
 

Lionattack

Active member
This was not an allstar game. Should have gone on, skated 4 on 4 or 3 on 3, or postponed. Ties on state titles are more a track/swimming thing. Don't like it.
No ties there both sports still will declare a winner by by looking at times all the way down. Shame for the teams that no winner will be determined.
 

CatAlum

Active member
The Toledo Blade article notes that the 2008 Michigan state title game between Marquette and Orchard Lake St. Mary was declared a draw after 8 OT's...109 minutes.

After reading/watching the various reports and interviews, it appears that the idea to stop the game came from the OHSAA and that the two coaches accepted this...maybe reluctantly, maybe with different levels of enthusiasm for the idea...but they both accepted it. When the regulators start throwing the word "safety" around, it gets pretty hard to take the counter position. My only real complaint is that there should have been contingencies in place rather than making hard decisions on the fly (e.g., a rule that reduces players on the ice after 3-4 OT's, etc). I'm sure there will be additional rules going forward.
 

Bennies'01

New member
Kind of embarrassing that it ended like this, but let me be the first to say that I hate hockey shootouts and hope the OHSAA never goes that route. I prefer the idea of having the first OT be 5 vs. 5, the second being 4 vs. 4 and then the third and all subsequent OTs being 3 vs. 3. That won't guarantee that games will never go to 7 OTs, but it makes it much less likely...it would also keep players fresher as the game goes on, for whatever that's worth.
 

FelisSilvestris

New member
It's pretty clear that the OHSAA has little forethought capability and contingency planning for situations like this. This is a circus and should have never happened. Player safety is paramount; they are kids. A few questions still unanswered...

- If player safety was the only reason, why not postpone/suspend the game to be completed later?
- If there was some other situation, such as a massive electrical power failure in the arena at the end of regulation, would a tie have been declared?
- If this is what the OHSAA officials were thinking of doing, why didn't they tell the teams that the 7th overtime would be the last one before that OT period started? That would have significantly affected how that period was played.
- What would OSHAA do if this was a semi-final game? Declare a tie and have 3 teams on the ice for the championship game?
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I don't particularly care for ties and judging from the photos of the players and coach, neither did they. Kudos to those couch potatoes that have contingencies in their daily lives for 8 OTs but as critical as I've been about OHSAA decisions, my criticisms have been about the ones they've had time to think through. OT IS the contingency. Ridiculous to plan for 8 of them, might as well plan for end of the world scenarios. Perhaps a change in protocol will occur but given the one at hand, having to make a spur of the tension decision, most people are not going to get it "half right" even if lives depended upon it.

I think I have to give the on-site officials a bit of a pass here. Hockey is a dangerous sport as is, played with very sharp edges. After that much play, you might as well have a bunch of drunks on the ice, for how fatigued a player would be after playing that long. Minds, let alone bodies are NOT working across the board.

I seriously laughed at this.
They are kids you can expect them to be able to go hours. You wouldn't expect a 50 year old to. Kids are resilient let em play
especially after another poster had clearly outlined the time and effort on the ice that had just occurred.

I think even in hind-sight, officials probably did the right thing.


It's pretty clear that the OHSAA has little forethought capability and contingency planning for situations like this. This is a circus and should have never happened. Player safety is paramount; they are kids. A few questions still unanswered...

1) - If player safety was the only reason, why not postpone/suspend the game to be completed later?
2) - If there was some other situation, such as a massive electrical power failure in the arena at the end of regulation, would a tie have been declared?
3) - If this is what the OHSAA officials were thinking of doing, why didn't they tell the teams that the 7th overtime would be the last one before that OT period started? That would have significantly affected how that period was played.
4) - What would OSHAA do if this was a semi-final game? Declare a tie and have 3 teams on the ice for the championship game?
1) Expense and travel time? That's what would have occurred to me. Certainly there's nothing here that can't be undone, should the schools decide they want to do it.

3) Didn't occur to them? How do you think they would have "significantly" changed their approaches? I have to imagine by the 7th OT, both teams were being as aggressive as possible on offense.

4) Good question except the sarcasm.



Hockey is one sport where a fatigue mistake can lead to a very dangerous cut. I guess I wouldn't have wanted to be the one that had to make the decision but I agree, there is a weakness in the manner of deciding regular time ties. However, I think they are consistent with other high school associations, correct? So, there's been a filtering. This wasn't a decision on a whim.


I think they should get a bit of a pass on this one.
 

Wadz06

Active member
This was a poor decision, finish the next day if safety is the real question. Another OSHAA failure, I see a shootout rule change coming or they will just do nothing again. Co Champs give me a break.
 
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