Things from your past that you wish could be brought back

eastisbest

Well-known member
So true! When the sun went down, the parents started calling us in. We could hear my dad's whistle a mile away and we better hustle home when he whistled...no lollygagging. Lollygagging...there's a word for the yappi youngsters.
Ma's calling, wasn't really part of the experience, not in my neighborhood. Being out at night wasn't a forbidden. You just knew to be home at certain times or hell would rise.
 

utsherman

Well-known member
We played "Americans & Russians" in our neighborhood. In homage it old school "Cowboys & Indians", I guess. If kids played outside anymore, they could probably bring this back given our current politics?
 

arizonawildcat

Well-known member
My baseball card collection. I sold it when I was in college for $15 and it was worth thousands then (e.g., Mickey Mantle andPete Rose rookie cards). God knows how much they're worth today. I was such a sucker.
 

irish_buffalo

Well-known member
My baseball card collection. I sold it when I was in college for $15 and it was worth thousands then (e.g., Mickey Mantle andPete Rose rookie cards). God knows how much they're worth today. I was such a sucker.
I had em too. You'd be surprised, the card game is junk these days. Once people realized they could produce fakes and the overabundance crushed it all. But to have the cards you mention would be sweet.

I'll never forget I traded my Michael Jordan rookie card in mind condition for a baseball bat and some candy. :ROFLMAO:
 

irish_buffalo

Well-known member
College football on Saturday only. I understand why the MAC plays on weekdays, but it sure is nice to have the 1 day for college football fans

I dont understand why power 5 teams play on weekdays
I like this one. Growing up Friday night was HS games, Saturday was college (and some HS), and Sunday was NFL. It was like a three day holiday ritual throughout the fall.

I also liked it when stores were not open on Sunday. I remember they started opening up at noon and only for a couple hours and not long afterwards realized through the sake of competition that Sunday was a great day to make money. Sunday was always at the grandparents house with extended family, usually a pot roast, kids playing football in the backyard. Good times.
 

irish_buffalo

Well-known member
I also remember loving Godfather's Pizza. They are still around elsewhere (SC and FL that I know of) and I always try to get some when I can.

Another would be Red Wells open faced roast beef sandwich with gravy on top. YUM. The last one closed about 6-7 years ago.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
My baseball card collection. I sold it when I was in college for $15 and it was worth thousands then (e.g., Mickey Mantle andPete Rose rookie cards). God knows how much they're worth today. I was such a sucker.
Mine was a rock collection. Even Gneiss would have been jealous. Oh and that Tonka road grader back when you hit your brother in the head with it, it could make an impact. Things now a day? smh so yeah,

metal toys and hot wheels. Kids today need to see these things.
 

Irwin20

Well-known member
My vinyl records. We had a yard sale about 15-20 years ago and I went out for about an hour to do some chores. When I came back all my records over 150 were sold by my wife. They were in the garage and not for sale as far as I knew. This was at the time where no one was playing them, just CDs mainly. I didn’t let on that I was really pissed but I was. I have no idea how much we got for them likely about $20.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
My vinyl records. We had a yard sale about 15-20 years ago and I went out for about an hour to do some chores. When I came back all my records over 150 were sold by my wife. They were in the garage and not for sale as far as I knew. This was at the time where no one was playing them, just CDs mainly. I didn’t let on that I was really pissed but I was. I have no idea how much we got for them likely about $20.
So that's how you stay married? I'll try that next time.
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
My mom gave up on calling and got a cowbell to get us all home.
That's what my parents used. We were made fun of unmercifully by the other kids in the neighborhood for it. If we were too far away to hear the cowbell, then we better have had mom or dad's permission to be there in the first place.
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
Mine was a rock collection. Even Gneiss would have been jealous. Oh and that Tonka road grader back when you hit your brother in the head with it, it could make an impact. Things now a day? smh so yeah,

metal toys and hot wheels. Kids today need to see these things.
I got Tonka's mighty loader for Xmas when I was in 2nd grade. I'm pretty sure it would survive a nuclear event.

Add anything that's built to last to this list. Too many items today are built to be thrown away after a few years of use whether it be some brands of power tools, appliances, furniture, etc. In mid-spring, I went to my local bike shop to see if they sold a specific tool to remove the lock ring on a bike pedal in order to overhaul the inner parts of the pedal (regrease the spindle, replace the bearings, etc). They didn't sell the tool, and they said nobody had ever asked them to overhaul pedals before. They just buy news ones and discard the old ones when a couple bucks worth of ball bearings and a dollop of grease is likely all they would need to make the old pedals turn like new.
 

utsherman

Well-known member
In my neighborhood, we simply called it "guns." "Bam! bam! got you, Mike!"
Yes, this was essentially the same game. It was a hybrid of hide and go seek and “guns”. Endless arguments as to whether you had actually gotten ‘shot’ before getting back to “ base”. :LOL:
 

Omar

Well-known member
My baseball card collection. I sold it when I was in college for $15 and it was worth thousands then (e.g., Mickey Mantle andPete Rose rookie cards). God knows how much they're worth today. I was such a sucker.
I’ve got a decent collection of older cards, don’t think I could ever sell them. I do have a 1960s Mickey Mantle Post Cereal card that would be worth $1200 in mint condition. As it stands, my card is in below avg condition and probably not even worth $50.

Unfortunately, anything from 1990-present is pretty much worthless bc the market became so oversaturated.
 

Omar

Well-known member
My vinyl records. We had a yard sale about 15-20 years ago and I went out for about an hour to do some chores. When I came back all my records over 150 were sold by my wife. They were in the garage and not for sale as far as I knew. This was at the time where no one was playing them, just CDs mainly. I didn’t let on that I was really pissed but I was. I have no idea how much we got for them likely about $20.
They’ve made a comeback with hipsters.
 

arizonawildcat

Well-known member
I’ve got a decent collection of older cards, don’t think I could ever sell them. I do have a 1960s Mickey Mantle Post Cereal card that would be worth $1200 in mint condition. As it stands, my card is in below avg condition and probably not even worth $50.

Unfortunately, anything from 1990-present is pretty much worthless bc the market became so oversaturated.
I remeember one year in the early 60's I had every card but one. Even today his name haunts me, a nobody named Howie Nunn. Nobody in the neighborhood had him either. I think Topps put his name and picture on only one card in the whole country.
 
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Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
I’ve got a decent collection of older cards, don’t think I could ever sell them. I do have a 1960s Mickey Mantle Post Cereal card that would be worth $1200 in mint condition. As it stands, my card is in below avg condition and probably not even worth $50.

Unfortunately, anything from 1990-present is pretty much worthless bc the market became so oversaturated.
Very good estimate. Upper Deck hit the scene in 1989 and established the market for the upscale high-gloss boutique cards that the other companies quickly followed in an attempt to compete. 1988 is the year that the price guides and collectors began declaring that the companies were overproducing their sets. Guess which Topps complete set I have the misfortune of owning...When I last checked many years ago, the most valuable card in the set was Tom Glavine's rookie.

I still have all my cards, but I doubt I have anything of great value since nearly all of them came from that era of overproduction. Nonetheless, I'll either hold onto them until I'm thoroughly strapped for cash, or I'll let my nephews have them when they get older since 1/3 of the collection likely belonged to my brother anyway.
 
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Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
I didn't like the goofy ones like bugs bunny/Daffy Duck cartoons much at all . I actually preferred the deep and meaningful ones like the Pink Panther and Scooby Doo.
I think the Smurfs had a lot more going on than I realized as a 6-year old.


I miss the cheap candy section at the Ben Franklin five and dime. Bubble gum cigarettes for a penny, a piece of Bazooka gum for 3 cents, a bullseye cream-filled caramel for 5 cents, a pouch of Fun Dip for 15 cents, and various other candies at those price points.
 

Irwin20

Well-known member
We lived about 60yds from a privately owned ice cream shop, Earls Dairy Whip. Cones were 10, 25 and 50 cents , add dip for a nickel. The owners used to write your order down longhand and total it up in their heads. Was there last year and they are still doing it (kids and grandkids) but at least checking it with a calculator. Needless to say the cones have gone up in price quite a bit.
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
We lived about 60yds from a privately owned ice cream shop, Earls Dairy Whip. Cones were 10, 25 and 50 cents , add dip for a nickel. The owners used to write your order down longhand and total it up in their heads. Was there last year and they are still doing it (kids and grandkids) but at least checking it with a calculator. Needless to say the cones have gone up in price quite a bit.
As a youngster, we had a place like that in my town called Delicious Dips. They would press candy eyes onto the dipped cone. They had the standard soft serve flavors plus an additional flavor they'd rotate every 2 weeks or so such as: bubble gum, root beer, banana, blue moon, etc. I'm not sure why it closed, but it was replaced by a variety of used car and boat lots before most recently being turned into an auto repair shop which seems to be doing a steady amount of business.
 
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Irwin20

Well-known member
We lived about 60yds from a privately owned ice cream shop, Earls Dairy Whip. Cones were 10, 25 and 50 cents , add dip for a nickel. The owners used to write your order down longhand and total it up in their heads. Was there last year and they are still doing it (kids and grandkids) but at least checking it with a calculator. Needless to say the cones have gone up in price quite a bit.
As a side note there was a mom and pop store right beside Earls called Guthries, wooden floors looks like something from a 1940s movie. They had all kids of penny candy and some grocery items. Anyhow mom and dad, when they were low on cash I guess ,would occasionally send one of us kids to pick something up and “put it on the tab” or in other words pay you later. Anyone else have a store like that growing up?
 

thavoice

Well-known member
I think the Smurfs had a lot more going on than I realized as a 6-year old.


I miss the cheap candy section at the Ben Franklin five and dime. Bubble gum cigarettes for a penny, a piece of Bazooka gum for 3 cents, a bullseye cream-filled caramel for 5 cents, a pouch of Fun Dip for 15 cents, and various other candies at those price points.
Our local Ben Franklin closed within the last couple of years. They tried to rebrand themselves about ten years ago by calling themselves Ben Franklin Variety Store , but when the owners decided to retire it went by the way side.
 
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