OHSAA Tournaments to Continue with Limited Spectators

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OHSAA Tournaments to Continue with Limited Spectators
Ohio Governor Mike DeWine has ordered most spectators to be kept away from indoor sporting events

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced Tuesday afternoon that all indoor sporting events in Ohio, including high school, collegiate and professional sports, shall continue without most spectators in attendance as Ohio seeks to contain the spread of the coronavirus COVID-19.

“This will be a very difficult time for our schools and fans, but we cannot ignore the directive of the Governor,” OHSAA Executive Director Jerry Snodgrass said. “We are pleased that our tournaments can continue and we will soon determine who can attend. However, we can already say that it will most likely be no more than the immediate family of the student-athletes participating in the event.”

Boys basketball regional tournament games scheduled for Tuesday night can proceed with fans. The OHSAA will announce Wednesday morning how the tournaments will proceed moving forward.

More information will be released as soon as possible, including the process for tickets already sold and what kind of media coverage will be permitted at the state tournaments.

The OHSAA girls basketball state tournament begins Thursday at St. John Arena, the wrestling state tournament begins Friday at the Schottenstein Center and the ice hockey state tournament begins Saturday morning at Nationwide Arena.
 
Typical over reaction......

If this is the case then they should allow live tv/web of games without restrictions.....
Don’t often agree with you but 10000% all games from here on out should be made publicly available for free over radio and tv. This is absolutely asinine on every single level. Let’s completely overreact to something that has had little to no impact on our state. Anyone who had a part in this ruling should be absolutely ashamed of themselves. Pathetic simply pathetic from everyone involved.
 
A complete over reaction by both the governor and the ohsaa. If it’s a health concern, why is it not when these same students sit side by side in a classroom?
The for profit Cavs, Monsters and Blue Jackets go on as scheduled. Kids that have waited a lifetime for this experience get screwed! Jerry Snotgrass is so afraid of the state taking over athketics that he bows to the governors wishes. Bet the Reds and Indians play as scheduled!
 

SVillegrad

Well-known member
It's a conspiracy. I'm telling you, if Mentor beats Medina tomorrow, it's because they wouldn't let fans in. ...

If Medina wins, it's all good, unless they don't let us in for the regional finals and we lose!!!

This thing sucks, but I will give DeWine credit. It's not always that Ohio is proactive. I know, I know, we'll all live (except for the old people who catch coronavirus if we don't try to contain this. But screw them ... they are old anyway).
 

CasualFan24

Active member
This is NOT an overreaction by any means whatsoever and has very little to do with the number of cases in our state right now - it's about containment and prevention folks....Every major college in the state has suspended face to face class until at the very least, the end of the month (some aren't going back until mid April). Collegiate conference tournaments are being cancelled, a very prominent pro tennis tournament in Cali has been cancelled....

How is The Ohio State University going to cancel all face to face class - but allow 30,000 people to enter its sporting arenas for high school tournaments?! It's not an overreaction and unfortunately, I think it's just the beginning....
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Jerry Snotgrass is so afraid of the state taking over athketics that he bows to the governors wishes.
While I think DeWine's directive is foolish...... (and Jerry is damned if he does and damned if he doesn't)

There's a better chance of McKinley and Massillon fans getting along before the State of Ohio takes over athletics.
 

IVCguy

Active member
This is NOT an overreaction by any means whatsoever and has very little to do with the number of cases in our state right now - it's about containment and prevention folks....Every major college in the state has suspended face to face class until at the very least, the end of the month (some aren't going back until mid April). Collegiate conference tournaments are being cancelled, a very prominent pro tennis tournament in Cali has been cancelled....

How is The Ohio State University going to cancel all face to face class - but allow 30,000 people to enter its sporting arenas for high school tournaments?! It's not an overreaction and unfortunately, I think it's just the beginning....
I have to disagree with you. If this virus existed in a vacuum of events, and we are just dealing with it alone, it would make perfect sense in terms of containment. But here is the fact that belies that reasoning - in the full context and reality: Influenza A. My nephew, a healthy 22 year-old, has it right now and is delirious. If he had any comorbidity, it could definitely kill him. In the US it has killed about 10,000 people this flu season and infected 19 million leading to 180,000 hospitalizations. Where are the cancellations of public events, quarantine zones, etc? Nothing, zip, zero, nada. By all indications, the flu will dwarf COVID-19 in terms of infections, hospitalizations, and deaths.

In that context, the reaction to coronavirus is a MASSIVE over-reaction. When I see something absurd like this, that lacks reasonable perspective, I always assume that politics is afoot. Gov Dewine doesn't want a voter screaming at him because he killed Granny who was 87 because he didn't do enough. But wait - since he did not take these actions for the flu, shouldn't he have people screaming at him over that? No, because the media isn't scaring people about the flu, just the less dangerous coronavirus. And THAT is what is going on here IMO.

In the meantime, kids who have dreamed about playing in front of thousands for a state championship will do it in front of 17 people so that some government officials don't have to get yelled at and take some criticism. The whole thing is ridiculous.
 
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CometCountry

Well-known member
Very good article on why Governor DeWine is being proactive rather than reactive--remember it's about the "greater good" in a democratic society!!
Here's part of the article that explains the reason Ohio is doing this:
Staying home helps prevent the US health system from being overloaded

"According to infectious disease epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch at Harvard, it’s “plausible” that 20 to 60 percent of adults will be infected with Covid-19 disease. So far, 80 percent of cases globally have been mild, but if the case fatality rate is around 1 percent (which several experts say it may be), a scenario is possible of tens or hundreds of thousands of deaths in the US alone.

Yet the speed at which the outbreak plays out matters hugely for its consequences. What epidemiologists fear most is the health care system becoming overwhelmed by a sudden explosion of illness that requires more people to be hospitalized than it can handle. In that scenario, more people will die because there won’t be enough hospital beds or ventilators to keep them alive.

A disastrous inundation of hospitals can likely be averted with protective measures we’re now seeing more of — closing schools, canceling mass gatherings, working from home, self-quarantine, avoiding crowds — to keep the virus from spreading fast.

Epidemiologists call this strategy of preventing a huge spike in cases “flattening the curve,”--"We are 10 days from the hospitals getting creamed." Schools and large gatherings should be ordered closed today. Coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. is at a make-or-break moment to test one of the most basic — but disruptive — public health tools. How social distancing --short term cancellations-- works. Our hospitals will not have the capacities necessary to treat all of the sick.
 
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IVCguy

Active member
Oh, and if these officials and organizations didn't react to the hysteria with the media, how long would it take for law firms to start advertising, "This is a non-attorney spokesperson. Did you get COVID-19 and suffer a financial loss or have a loved one get sick or die? Call our hotline now to see if you qualify to join in our campaign to compensate the victims of government and corporate inaction and negligence. You won't pay unless you win. Call today. We will make them pay." Lol
 

The Dock

Well-known member
A complete over reaction by both the governor and the ohsaa. If it’s a health concern, why is it not when these same students sit side by side in a classroom?
That’s for the districts to decide, at the moment. The other thing to mind is the closure of schools en masse for an extended period of time is going to carry some great consequences to our society.
 

IVCguy

Active member
Very good article on why Governor DeWine is being proactive rather than reactive--remember it's about the "greater good" in a democratic society!!
Here's part of the article that explains the reason Ohio is doing this:
Staying home helps prevent the US health system from being overloaded

"According to infectious disease epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch at Harvard, it’s “plausible” that 20 to 60 percent of adults will be infected with Covid-19 disease. So far, 80 percent of cases globally have been mild, but if the case fatality rate is around 1 percent (which several experts say it may be), a scenario is possible of tens or hundreds of thousands of deaths in the US alone.

Yet the speed at which the outbreak plays out matters hugely for its consequences. What epidemiologists fear most is the health care system becoming overwhelmed by a sudden explosion of illness that requires more people to be hospitalized than it can handle. In that scenario, more people will die because there won’t be enough hospital beds or ventilators to keep them alive.

A disastrous inundation of hospitals can likely be averted with protective measures we’re now seeing more of — closing schools, canceling mass gatherings, working from home, self-quarantine, avoiding crowds — to keep the virus from spreading fast.

Epidemiologists call this strategy of preventing a huge spike in cases “flattening the curve,”--"We are 10 days from the hospitals getting creamed." Schools and large gatherings should be ordered closed today. Coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. is at a make-or-break moment to test one of the most basic — but disruptive — public health tools. How social distancing --short term cancellations-- works. Our hospitals will not have the capacities necessary to treat all of the sick.
Which is all perfectly reasonable - if the same actions were taken for the flu.
 

cknights

Active member
That’s for the districts to decide, at the moment. The other thing to mind is the closure of schools en masse for an extended period of time is going to carry some great consequences to our society.
It sure will. Thus, any child who is in contact with the general population and is carrying the virus will help spread, most likely quicker, than shutting down public sporting events. Not every child's family goes to sporting events. But every child (typically) goes to school.

I think people that have been on these boards, defending this action, don't understand that shutting down sporting events is merely cutting off the tail. The head will still bite. If they shut down schools and churches along with these sporting events (as well as workplaces, storefronts, etc), then a virus could be contained. This is simply not a viable solution.

But, the bottom line is that until we, as a state, shut down every district, then there will be no slow down of the virus spreading. Kids will still carry it from family to family via school.
 

RollingTrain

Active member
I wouldn't hold my breathe on the boys tourney taking place next week....all it's going to take is one case in Columbus/campus area before everyone falls off the wagon.

I have the same feeling about the NCAA tourney. I think the odds are better than not it gets canceled.

Not that I want either of these two things to not take place, but it's my gut feeling.
 

CometCountry

Well-known member
Which is all perfectly reasonable - if the same actions were taken for the flu.
The typical flu has a vaccine that people could've received anytime over the past 6 months--over 10,000 people haven't died in Ohio from the flu. That is a straw man argument. A vaccine for COVID 19 is 6 months to a year from being ready according to the CDC---cancellation of events is to slow the spread so hospitals don't get overwhelmed--not really hard to understand. I imagine Ohio school districts will all be taking a 7-14 day Spring Break very, very soon--many have their Spring Break already built into the schedule anyway.
 

yj_runfan

Well-known member
Where will young children with working parents go if schools are closed? Daycare? That should stop the virus, right?
 

COACH_XYZ&12345

Active member
This is NOT an overreaction by any means whatsoever and has very little to do with the number of cases in our state right now - it's about containment and prevention folks....Every major college in the state has suspended face to face class until at the very least, the end of the month (some aren't going back until mid April). Collegiate conference tournaments are being cancelled, a very prominent pro tennis tournament in Cali has been cancelled....

How is The Ohio State University going to cancel all face to face class - but allow 30,000 people to enter its sporting arenas for high school tournaments?! It's not an overreaction and unfortunately, I think it's just the beginning....

So what is the lack of containment and prevention measures for HIV, Hepatitis, TB, SARS, Ebola, Measles, Shingles, Whooping cough, Diptheria? All in which have killed millions of people annually. Yes I'd say it's a complete overreaction.
 

COACH_XYZ&12345

Active member
Except it's not the flu. It's more contagious and there's no vaccine.

It's still a respiratory infectious illness, although by different viruses, remain very much parallel in symptoms, transmission, treatment, and prevention. Yes, COVID-19 possesses greater contagious properties, however prevention, is very similar to preventing the flu. Exactly why I believe it's an extreme overreaction. We haven't taken these measures for influenza, which kills WAY more people annually than COVID-19 does. This is not a new virus strain people. It's been around. For whatever reason, spike originating in China, now has caused major panic. In 3 months from now, we won't even be talking about this.
 

AllSports12

Moderator
Except it's not the flu. It's more contagious and there's no vaccine.
And yet even with that vaccine we have had (CDC Estimates from 10/1/19 - 2/29-20) 34-49 million infected, 350,000 - 620,000 hospital admissions, and 20,000 - 52,000 deaths attributed to the flu....

and not one event cancelled due to the flu....

This is political BS, (the hysteria) fueled by the media and gutless politicians.
 

ratterbox

Member
Miami shut down & guess what ....The BARS WERE PACKED LAST NIGHT, then kids go back to their dorms! Hummm...I dont see the logic there and I would guess all colleges were like that.
I will give Dewine credit it was a gutsy call and that's why he gets the "big bucks". BUT since he made the call ...it should not just be HS but ALL
events. NCAA, Reds opening day parade, opening games, State senate hearings, court rooms?
 

IVCguy

Active member
The typical flu has a vaccine that people could've received anytime over the past 6 months--over 10,000 people haven't died in Ohio from the flu. That is a straw man argument. A vaccine for COVID 19 is 6 months to a year from being ready according to the CDC---cancellation of events is to slow the spread so hospitals don't get overwhelmed--not really hard to understand. I imagine Ohio school districts will all be taking a 7-14 day Spring Break very, very soon--many have their Spring Break already built into the schedule anyway.
According to the CDC, 10K people have died from the flu this flu season. Strawman? What are you defending? The fact that there is a vaccine available for flu, has nothing to do with the point I'm making.

Because you are confused, the flu is already an epidemic, but none of the actions taken for COVID-19 were taken for it. Why? And explain how and why the difference in response.
 

COACH_XYZ&12345

Active member
And yet even with that vaccine we have had (CDC Estimates from 10/1/19 - 2/29-20) 34-49 million infected, 350,000 - 620,000 hospital admissions, and 20,000 - 52,000 deaths attributed to the flu....

and not one event cancelled due to the flu....

This is political BS, (the hysteria) fueled by the media and gutless politicians.
Stop. Your voice of reasoning is gonna offend people!
 

CasualFan24

Active member
I have to disagree with you. If this virus existed in a vacuum of events, and we are just dealing with it alone, it would make perfect sense in terms of containment. But here is the fact that belies that reasoning - in the full context and reality: Influenza A. My nephew, a healthy 22 year-old, has it right now and is delirious. If he had any comorbidity, it could definitely kill him. In the US it has killed about 10,000 people this flu season and infected 19 million leading to 180,000 hospitalizations. Where are the cancellations of public events, quarantine zones, etc? Nothing, zip, zero, nada. By all indications, the flu will dwarf COVID-19 in terms of infections, hospitalizations, and deaths.

In that context, the reaction to coronavirus is a MASSIVE over-reaction. When I see something absurd like this, that lacks reasonable perspective, I always assume that politics is afoot. Gov Dewine doesn't want a voter screaming at him because he killed Granny who was 87 because he didn't do enough. But wait - since he did not take these actions for the flu, shouldn't he have people screaming at him over that? No, because the media isn't scaring people about the flu, just the less dangerous coronavirus. And THAT is what is going on here IMO.

In the meantime, kids who have dreamed about playing in front of thousands for a state championship will do it in front of 17 people so that some government officials don't have to get yelled at and take some criticism. The whole thing is ridiculous.
If you are tested and diagnosed with Influenza A or B - do you hop back in your car a go back to work? Head to the grocery store? Run down to the local basketball game? No - you stay home. You are under quarantine, not specifically by order, but you self quarantine do you not? The Corona Virus is fast spreading and has a 14 day incubation period - do you know how many people could get sick in that short of time if we don't do things to try to prevent it? I'm not talking about it being life threatening - because its only life threatening to the very young and the elderly - but many people still end up in the ER with this thing for treatment. Its about keeping our health care infrastructure up right. And containing the spread to a point that doesn't overwhelm the health care industry.

And btw - right here in Ohio, there have been entire school districts that have closed their doors for days at a time this year to combat sickness over this winter.......so yes, things do close for regular/everyday illnesses if needed....
 
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