OHSAA Tournaments to Continue with Limited Spectators

IVCguy

Active member
I get it - but I'm not on here trying to take a victory lap.....I just like to think that people can change their mind when something eye opening happens...
My undergrad degree was biology. Not micro though, but I had a few courses. Not an expert on contagious diseases by a long shot, but I have a working knowledge of incubation periods, infectious periods, modes of transmission, and RO values. Clearly, COVID-19 is one of these diseases where the spread is the worst thing about it because the higher RO value puts the most at risk for morbidity group to a higher level of risk. Still, I thought we were at a place where you protect that high risk group, but not shut down the country - yet. But I wouldn't have the ability to judge that.

My son literally wrote the emergency management manual for epidemic response for our county and several others. He is writing another one right now and is a qualified expert on exactly what is happening with COVID-19 in terms of government response.

I texted him this morning about all that has transpired in the last 72 hours, and his reply was, "Yeah. I don't get it." Neither do I - fully. But when it is clear that this isn't any degree of over-reaction, I will applaud you on your victory lap.
 

CasualFan24

Active member
My undergrad degree was biology. Not micro though, but I had a few courses. Not an expert on contagious diseases by a long shot, but I have a working knowledge of incubation periods, infectious periods, modes of transmission, and RO values. Clearly, COVID-19 is one of these diseases where the spread is the worst thing about it because the higher RO value puts the most at risk for morbidity group to a higher level of risk. Still, I thought we were at a place where you protect that high risk group, but not shut down the country - yet. But I wouldn't have the ability to judge that.

My son literally wrote the emergency management manual for epidemic response for our county and several others. He is writing another one right now and is a qualified expert on exactly what is happening with COVID-19 in terms of government response.

I texted him this morning about all that has transpired in the last 72 hours, and his reply was, "Yeah. I don't get it." Neither do I - fully. But when it is clear that this isn't any degree of over-reaction, I will applaud you on your victory lap.
What!? You are reading me totally wrong - there is no victory lap. at all....
 

hsfan60

Active member
OHSAA Tournaments to Continue with Limited Spectators
Ohio Governor Mike DeWine has ordered most spectators to be kept away from indoor sporting events

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced Tuesday afternoon that all indoor sporting events in Ohio, including high school, collegiate and professional sports, shall continue without most spectators in attendance as Ohio seeks to contain the spread of the coronavirus COVID-19.

“This will be a very difficult time for our schools and fans, but we cannot ignore the directive of the Governor,” OHSAA Executive Director Jerry Snodgrass said. “We are pleased that our tournaments can continue and we will soon determine who can attend. However, we can already say that it will most likely be no more than the immediate family of the student-athletes participating in the event.”

Boys basketball regional tournament games scheduled for Tuesday night can proceed with fans. The OHSAA will announce Wednesday morning how the tournaments will proceed moving forward.

More information will be released as soon as possible, including the process for tickets already sold and what kind of media coverage will be permitted at the state tournaments.

The OHSAA girls basketball state tournament begins Thursday at St. John Arena, the wrestling state tournament begins Friday at the Schottenstein Center and the ice hockey state tournament begins Saturday morning at Nationwide Arena.
OHSAA Recent decisiion:

At 12:45 p.m. Thursday, the Ohio High School Athletic Association announced that all remaining winter tournament contests are immediately postponed due to the growing situation with the coronavirus COVID-19.

The suspended tournaments include the girls state basketball tournament; the state individual wrestling tournament; the state ice hockey tournament, and the boys regional and state basketball tournaments.

“We will use this time to work with the appropriate state authorities and health experts to determine our next steps moving forward,” Snodgrass said. “We realize this is disappointing for our participants and their fans, but the overall health and safety of everyone involved in our tournaments is our priority.”

No timetable has been determined for possible rescheduling for the tournaments.

The announcement was made after state and local officials recommended that no public gatherings take place to help stop the spread of the virus.

The OHSAA will send further updates regarding ticket refunds.
 

IVCguy

Active member
I learned some things about our system from talking more in depth with my son. Local health departments have a lot of authority in epidemics and they coordinate with the state DOH. In this case, however, it worked the other way – the state dictated down after advising the governor.

State and federal emergency declarations free up money and resources for local agencies. Emergency Management offices in counties coordinate all of the local agencies and entities involved, and, for instance, are the connector of a county health dept with FEMA or other state-level agencies outside of the DOH.

He says that the confusion the public has about the steps that have been taken arises from all the cooks that are in the kitchen from CDC down to 50 states and thousands of local health departments. Responses are supposed to be locally crafted. For example, Seattle needs a different plan than Cleveland because one has an outbreak and the other is expecting one. Yet, there is also a federal approach and each state will take their actions. There is a lot of room for confused messaging in that structure of federalism.

He also says that the sense that this wasn’t handled as good as it could have been, especially on the federal level, comes from a lack of good information. China had the opportunity to dispense good information about the virus, what worked, what didn’t, etc. but they are commies and are more interested in what is good for the Communist Party than their own people, or certainly, the rest of the world. We are just now getting reliable information from Italy.

Another cause of some response problems was a lack of experience with pandemics. We have had them, but not on the scale that this one is thought may be - and each one is unique. This means that a lot of plans that were in place were theoretical, more than practical. So, our government got caught in the trap of, “well, it sounded good in theory” and "it worked for that, but not for this". Ideally, you know exactly how the disease is spreading, its course, and its rates of hospitalization and morbidity, and from that you can craft a response that is the most effective. In this case, since reliable information was lacking, the government had to take the approach “better to do more than less” – and that has contributed to the sense that there is some over-reaction going on as well as the sense that some things slipped through the cracks.

He just about had a cow when the director of the ODOH said that “there are probably already 100K infections in the state”. She has no way of knowing that, and rule #1 of crisis management is don’t say anything you don’t know for sure because public anxiety or panic can become a major problem in and of itself.

He also said to not underestimate bureaucratic angles that can be worked here. The state DOH isn’t an agency that gets a lot of attention, it doesn’t generate as much revenue as some other agencies, and it is not funded as well as some other departments. This is their time to shine, and that opportunity will not be wasted.

As for who was right about what the right response was about this thing from the beginning, it’s still too early to know. It really depends on what you believe the goal should be. If the sole goal is to limit the disease, then what isn’t warranted and what price is too high? If your goal is to limit the disease, but not devastate the economy, then you would do and not do certain things. If your goal is to limit the disease, not hurt the economy, and allow things like sports to happen, then you get another different set of decisions distinct from the other two.

But it’s always easy to justify almost any over-reaction under the principle “err on the side of caution.” However, I suspect that when this thing is over, many people are going to think the response was out of proportion and unnecessary – which is unfortunate because they will be less likely to take it as seriously the next time when, perhaps, they should.

One final thing – saw Dr Faucci yesterday talking about the cancellations of entire tournaments and suspensions of leagues. He cited the complete cancellation as an example of erring on the side of doing more, but he said he had no problem with these events going on with limited audiences as they first proposed. I think this is one of the things people are really going to regret when this is all over. Some HS kids and college athletes missed an opportunity to compete for championships – an opportunity that is lost forever. If having the event with a limited audience doesn’t really do much to increase the risk of a spike in infections, then why did we take things away from people that cannot ever be replaced?
 
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