Great News for a Mars Colony!

BlackHawk

Well-known member
The three big Mars missions taking place this summer:


The summer race to land a space probe on Mars is off to a hot start.

Three countries—The Hope Probe (United Arab Emirates), Tianwen-1 (China) and Mars 2020 (United States)—have all taken their positions, hoping to take advantage of the period of time when the Earth and Mars are nearest: a mere 55 million kilometres (34 million miles) apart.
Two out of three would be a success, IMO.

Meatloaf concurs, "Two out of three aint' bad."
 

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
Venus probably has active volcanoes right now

Scientists have long known that Venus remained active long after fellow rocky planets Mercury and Mars lost their geological mojo. The second rock from the sun sports far fewer craters than those two worlds, a count that's consistent with a global resurfacing event some 500 million to 700 million years ago. (Our solar system's other inner rocky planet, Earth, remains extremely active today, of course.)

But recently, evidence has been building that Venus' volcanic activity continued much later into the planet's history — perhaps even through to the present day. And the new study bolsters that viewpoint.
 

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
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A Freaky Elongated Cloud Has Reappeared on Mars

Like clockwork, a strange cloud has returned high above the Martian surface.

This long, thin cloud was spotted on July 17 and 19 by the Visual Monitoring Camera (VMC) attached to Mars Express, a satellite that’s been in orbit around Mars since 2004. These images were made possible owing to Mars Express’s elliptical orbit and the VMC’s wide field view, as noted in a European Space Agency press release.
 

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
Mars map with water: incredible terraforming image shows Elon Musk’s dream

What would Mars look like if most of its surface was covered with water? Thanks to a new project released this week, we may have a better idea.

A new map shows what the red planet would look like if 71 percent of its surface area was covered with water — around the same proportion as Earth.

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lotr10

Well-known member
Anyone who has read the books or watched the TV series "The Expanse" is familiar with Ceres.


NASA's Dawn spacecraft gave scientists extraordinary close-up views of the dwarf planet Ceres, which lies in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. By the time the mission ended in October 2018, the orbiter had dipped to less than 22 miles (35 kilometers) above the surface, revealing crisp details of the mysterious bright regions Ceres had become known for.
 

lotr10

Well-known member
Considering how 2020 is going so far is this in our future?


"To put this into perspective, one of the closest supernova threats today is from the star Betelgeuse, which is over 600 light-years away and well outside of the kill distance of 25 light-years," said graduate student and study co-author Adrienne Ertel.

The team explored other astrophysical causes for ozone depletion, such as meteorite impacts, solar eruptions and gamma-ray bursts. "But these events end quickly and are unlikely to cause the long-lasting ozone depletion that happened at the end of the Devonian period," said graduate student and study co-author Jesse Miller.

A supernova, on the other hand, delivers a one-two punch, the researchers said. The explosion immediately bathes Earth with damaging UV, X-rays and gamma rays. Later, the blast of supernova debris slams into the solar system, subjecting the planet to long-lived irradiation from cosmic rays accelerated by the supernova. The damage to Earth and its ozone layer can last for up to 100,000 years.

It's a good thing we're outside the Betelgeuse kill zone:

 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
Considering how 2020 is going so far is this in our future?


"To put this into perspective, one of the closest supernova threats today is from the star Betelgeuse, which is over 600 light-years away and well outside of the kill distance of 25 light-years," said graduate student and study co-author Adrienne Ertel.

The team explored other astrophysical causes for ozone depletion, such as meteorite impacts, solar eruptions and gamma-ray bursts. "But these events end quickly and are unlikely to cause the long-lasting ozone depletion that happened at the end of the Devonian period," said graduate student and study co-author Jesse Miller.

A supernova, on the other hand, delivers a one-two punch, the researchers said. The explosion immediately bathes Earth with damaging UV, X-rays and gamma rays. Later, the blast of supernova debris slams into the solar system, subjecting the planet to long-lived irradiation from cosmic rays accelerated by the supernova. The damage to Earth and its ozone layer can last for up to 100,000 years.

It's a good thing we're outside the Betelgeuse kill zone:

I've always been fascinated by the distances between the planets, stars and galaxies in the universe. Betelgeuse, one of the brightest stars in the sky, is somewhere between 600-700 light years away.

Doing the math: a light year is approx. 5.88 trillion miles, therefore Betelgeuse is over 3,528,000,000,000,000 miles away (using the lower estimate of 600 light years away). An incomprehensible distance.

More math: if we are in a spaceship traveling 100,000 mph, it would take over 4 million years to get there. Amazing. Bring plenty of snacks for the trip.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I've always been fascinated by the distances between the planets, stars and galaxies in the universe. Betelgeuse, one of the brightest stars in the sky, is somewhere between 600-700 light years away.

Doing the math: a light year is approx. 5.88 trillion miles, therefore Betelgeuse is over 3,528,000,000,000,000 miles away (using the lower estimate of 600 light years away). An incomprehensible distance.

More math: if we are in a spaceship traveling 100,000 mph, it would take over 4 million years to get there. Amazing. Bring plenty of snacks for the trip.
My favorite science author has a great book for explaining time travel, historical and cognitive perspectives and he doesn't skimp the math at least as far as special relativity (not that hard really).
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Yappi

Go Buckeyes
NASA JPL Says Tiny Asteroid Approaching, May Strike Earth Election Eve

Amid a pandemic, civil unrest and a divisive U.S. election season, we now have an asteroid zooming toward us.

On the day before the presidential vote, no less.
 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
NASA JPL Says Tiny Asteroid Approaching, May Strike Earth Election Eve



From the article: NASA says there are three potential impacts but, “based on 21 observations spanning 12.968 days,” the agency has determined the asteroid probably — phew! — won’t have any deep impact — let alone bring Armageddon.

I wonder if NASA rounded the 12.968 days to the nearest 1/1,000 of a day? It was probably more like 12.9678371251 or maybe even 12.9681394425 or whatever (inquiring minds need to know...not). Obviously, getting it to the nearest 1/1,000 of a day (86.4 seconds) was important for NASA on this press release. ;)

I know NASA needs to be exact, but really? I found this pretty funny. This was for a press release. Round it to 13 days.
 

lotr10

Well-known member
My guess is that the venting gases theory and not alien engines are responsible for any acceleration but.....................


In 2018, our solar system ran into an object lost in interstellar space. The object, dubbed 'Oumuamua, seemed to be long and thin — cigar-shaped — and tumbling end over end. Then, close observations showed it was accelerating, as if something were pushing on it. Scientists still aren't sure why.

One explanation? The object was propelled by an alien machine, such as a lightsail — a wide, millimeter-thin machine that accelerates as it's pushed by solar radiation. The main proponent of this argument was Avi Loeb, a Harvard University astrophysicist.

Most scientists, however, think 'Oumuamua's wonky acceleration was likely due to a natural phenomenon. In June, a research team proposed that solid hydrogen was blasting invisibly off the interstellar object's surface and causing it to speed up.
 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
This still seems like a long time:

Stuff like this is always interesting and it pushes our science forward, but I'm usually a bit skeptical. There are an awful lot of "ifs" and "calculations" in their thinking, not to mention enormous costs. Still, this line of thinking drives our technology and science. While this idea might not work for this application, it might be used for some other purpose...or some other idea derived from it might work.
 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
Hopefully they die of old age.


But Musk is reminding us that risk averse society's. like the one we've become, will not settle the solar system. Someone else will.
One of my dreams as a kid was visiting other planets. I doubt if I'll live long enough to see humans colonize Mars, or even visit Mars. I am not as optimistic as some of the "big thinkers" like Elon Musk (or lotr10!), but I do think humans will make it to Mars...eventually. The timetable for visiting Mars will be much longer than the "sometime in the 2030's" that we often hear. Too many obstacles and money constraints. However, assuming humans are still here a hundred years from now, I think we'll make it! (How's that for optimism?)
 

Crusaders

Moderator
I think our trajectory is pretty clear at this point: if we avoid nuclear war and a global communist order, we'll become a society that utilizes implants (neuro, optical, limbs, whatever) and biological engineering to make of ourselves whatever is needed to accomplish the tasks required of us, partly to compete with AI for jobs, partly to push the envelope of human achievement (ex. colonizing space). It's not exactly a great trajectory, but overall we don't seem to be too concerned about it. I'm sure there will be people who resist to live a more analog life, but they'll be looked at like how we view the Amish.
 

lotr10

Well-known member
I think our trajectory is pretty clear at this point: if we avoid nuclear war and a global communist order, we'll become a society that utilizes implants (neuro, optical, limbs, whatever) and biological engineering to make of ourselves whatever is needed to accomplish the tasks required of us, partly to compete with AI for jobs, partly to push the envelope of human achievement (ex. colonizing space). It's not exactly a great trajectory, but overall we don't seem to be too concerned about it. I'm sure there will be people who resist to live a more analog life, but they'll be looked at like how we view the Amish.
As you noted this will be particularly key to space exploration and colonization.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
probably all happen quicker under that global communist order. they don't even consult FDA before getting rid of a political rival. I don't see anything keeping them from plugging in the populace.
 
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