Fentanyl

brianwr112

Well-known member
Yes, YES, and THIS is why you don't start!!! These are the stories that need to be shared. Yes, there are instances where someone with a knee surgery get hooked, but my guess these are the one offs, these are the exceptions rather than the rule. Doctors wouldn't prescribe them if a high percentage of people got hooked.
I don't have all the answers, but not starting when you're a teen is the first step, on anything, cigarettes, beer, weed.
Did you miss the whole part where doctors were handing out pain meds left and right?
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
Yes, YES, and THIS is why you don't start!!! These are the stories that need to be shared. Yes, there are instances where someone with a knee surgery get hooked, but my guess these are the one offs, these are the exceptions rather than the rule. Doctors wouldn't prescribe them if a high percentage of people got hooked.
I don't have all the answers, but not starting when you're a teen is the first step, on anything, cigarettes, beer, weed.
Doctors everywhere prescribed Oxycontin as it was pitched to them as the miracle non-addictive time released opiate. They were also financially incentivized in many instances to prescribe it. That placed good people in a position of becoming addicts by just following the directions of their trusted physician. Do some research and you will see it was anything but a one off. It impacted not only those who were prescribed oxycontin, became addicted and were then yanked off of the oxycontin and ended up turning to heroin and fentanyl as an alternative, but it put oxycontin on the street where it was used by the "common" substance abusers who then become addicts and followed the oxy to opiates/synthetic opiate path of those initially prescribed by the doctors. Purdue Pharma, physicians and pharmacies made millions, some of which they are now paying back in huge settlements. Go watch Dopesick or read the book above. You will be enlightened and disgusted.
 

limabean

Active member
Fentanyl is a great drug when used appropriately. Doctors in Ohio are much more restricted these days in the amount of opiates they can prescribe. There were shortages of injectable opiates including fentanyl during the height of Covid hospitalizations. This was due to demand but compounded by the fact that the government (DEA, DOJ) required that manufacturers decrease opiate production in recent years. It would seem to me that fewer people should be getting hooked on opiates from prescriptions. There are plenty of people on Suboxone and methadone treatment for opioid addiction. I see them frequently where I work.
 

14Red

Well-known member
Doctors everywhere prescribed Oxycontin as it was pitched to them as the miracle non-addictive time released opiate. They were also financially incentivized in many instances to prescribe it. That placed good people in a position of becoming addicts by just following the directions of their trusted physician. Do some research and you will see it was anything but a one off. It impacted not only those who were prescribed oxycontin, became addicted and were then yanked off of the oxycontin and ended up turning to heroin and fentanyl as an alternative, but it put oxycontin on the street where it was used by the "common" substance abusers who then become addicts and followed the oxy to opiates/synthetic opiate path of those initially prescribed by the doctors. Purdue Pharma, physicians and pharmacies made millions, some of which they are now paying back in huge settlements. Go watch Dopesick or read the book above. You will be enlightened and disgusted.
I certainly understand this. And now that we know all of this, it should certainly stop addiction or at least people take these meds with their eyes wide open.
 

Gh0st

Well-known member
The culture for opioid prescribing has shifted dramatically with the newer generations of physicians very rarely prescribing unless in the very short term as part of significant injury or major surgery.

Outside of cancer related pain, no study has ever demonstrated opioid, including illegally obtained ones, helps chronic pain in any way has significant potential to make the pain worse and a longer term issue by introducing addiction and tolerance to medication.

That being said, I can definitely say that visits that I’ve attempted to intervene on someone on these meds chronically, are usually the most difficult visits and people generally get very manipulative, angry, verbally abusive, and even violent toward my staff. I’ve gotten the threat more than once that goes “If you don’t fill my meds, I’ll just go buy heroine” and I just refuse to play that game anymore. I will do whatever I can to safely get someone off these medicines and onto alternative meds or supplemental treatments, but I drew the line years ago that if someone is willing to break the law and obtain these things illegally despite my efforts, I take no responsibility for that and threatening anything simply doesn’t work.
 

bigkat

Well-known member
I had a granddaughter who two weeks after her 22nd birthday died from heroin laced with fentanyl. What a waste.
so sorry.... a classmate of mine lost his daughter on Nov 1...... such sadness, and again i can't believe Biden didn't bring this up to the China dude, during their 3 hour meeting... i can't for the life of me seeing Biden talking to anyone for 3 hours.....


and yet banjo boy never brings up that this killed over 110,000 Americans this year.... never TALKS ABOUT IT EVER, and not one of those dam reporters ever put his feet to the fire on this subject!!!
 
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