Coaches

So do high school coaches still get paid because everything is shut down and season in jeopardy? I’m sure all the coaches started with their teams. Do high school coaches sign contracts each year to coach? This is interesting to me since this debate came up The other day with some guys I know. Thoughts?
 

thePITman

Well-known member
I am on our HS coaching staff and would have received a stipend. I do not know the answer - and I have not asked - but honestly, I do not expect one if we don't resume.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
It's going to be up to each school district, but I don't see many paying out tax dollars they're not obligated to pay. I know they signed contracts, but if they're not coaching ...

I am going to guess that the stimulus act just passed might cover it. If I was still a coach, I would be looking into it.
 
It's going to be up to each school district, but I don't see many paying out tax dollars they're not obligated to pay. I know they signed contracts, but if they're not coaching ...

I am going to guess that the stimulus act just passed might cover it. If I was still a coach, I would be looking into it.
What do you mean the stimulus act may cover it?
 
What do you mean the stimulus act may cover it?
And I would think they are obligated since contract was signed. It’s not because the coach didn’t want to coach or quit... there is a national shut down. I think the coaches could fight the schools if they didn’t pay after the coaches started the season with practices and what not and then got shut down. I would hope the schools would honor the contracts in good faith. Any attorneys on here?
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
I am on our HS coaching staff and would have received a stipend. I do not know the answer - and I have not asked - but honestly, I do not expect one if we don't resume.
I suppose they could pro-rate it for the roughly 3 weeks of practice that took place prior to schools being ordered to close.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
I suppose they could pro-rate it for the roughly 3 weeks of practice that took place prior to schools being ordered to close.
Exactly, and I'm sure that would be done.

Let me give an example. Suppose you sign a contract to coach 7th grade basketball and the season gets cancelled when only four boys, or girls, try out for the team. Are you going to get paid anyway? Not a chance. Now they might assign you to help with the 8th grade team or somebody else, but if you're not coaching something you're not going to get paid.

The stimulus act included some unique types of unemployment compensation for jobs not usually covered, like independent contractors, & self-employed. People who umpire high school baseball and softball are covered. Coaching supplemental contracts might be somehow covered.
 

bucksman

Moderator
I would guess the answer varies system-by-system.
I'm thinking schools might give out part of the supplemental once all duties to "close out the season" are completed, since there were some duties of the season which will be performed.
 
I would guess the answer varies system-by-system.
I'm thinking schools might give out part of the supplemental once all duties to "close out the season" are completed, since there were some duties of the season which will be performed.
“Some duties?” Well, this coach has already attended 4 district coaches meetings, scheduled 27 games and 4 scrimmages, taken inventory and ordered equipment, ordered, distributed and collected money for hats, etc., organized fundraising, interviewed and hired assistant coaches, supervised fall and spring open fields/gyms, supervised pre season conditioning, worked concessions and lined up concession stand workers for several football, volleyball, and basketball games, worked on the field and rehung the batting cage nets, communicated with several parents and school administrators to provide information on the coming season, communicated and provided information to local media, communicated with college coaches, scheduled and directed 2 practices per day for two squads 6 days per week from Feb. 24-March 13, continued to provide information electronically during a pandemic, am I forgetting anything? It has become a year-round job and I would bet many coaches put in more hours than I do. Oh, and my contract is for the same amount as the golf coach’s lol. You do it because you love baseball and working with the kids.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
“Some duties?” Well, this coach has already attended 4 district coaches meetings, scheduled 27 games and 4 scrimmages, taken inventory and ordered equipment, ordered, distributed and collected money for hats, etc., organized fundraising, interviewed and hired assistant coaches, supervised fall and spring open fields/gyms, supervised pre season conditioning, worked concessions and lined up concession stand workers for several football, volleyball, and basketball games, worked on the field and rehung the batting cage nets, communicated with several parents and school administrators to provide information on the coming season, communicated and provided information to local media, communicated with college coaches, scheduled and directed 2 practices per day for two squads 6 days per week from Feb. 24-March 13, continued to provide information electronically during a pandemic, am I forgetting anything? It has become a year-round job and I would bet many coaches put in more hours than I do. Oh, and my contract is for the same amount as the golf coach’s lol. You do it because you love baseball and working with the kids.
Pay the man and the women too who coach baseball (if there are any) and softball
 
Unless it's specified in the contract, districts likely have no basis to prorate a coaching stipend. Whether districts are on the hook to pay spring coaches will depend on the particular contractual language as well as some common law factors such as "frustration of purpose" (just Google it). The fact that the OHSAA has continued to postpone the season instead of cancelling it helps the coaches' case, because a postponement of practices and competitions isn't a moratorium on all coaching-related activity (coaches are still communicating electronically with athletes, keeping parents and booster representatives informed, scheduling and planning for the post-postponement period, etc.).
 

Dfoxfan37

Member
My wife is a girls head track coach, and while obviously they’re not out practicing, she is constantly, in contact with her girls; especially the better/harder working girls who continue to workout and stay in shape. Also she has been running conditioning stuff since way before the actual start day, not to mention time she’s put into clinics and that. I’m not saying she’s working as hard as if the season is going on currently but she put in a lot of extra time in the past few months, and still keeping in contact sending workouts etc....
 
My wife is a girls head track coach, and while obviously they’re not out practicing, she is constantly, in contact with her girls; especially the better/harder working girls who continue to workout and stay in shape. Also she has been running conditioning stuff since way before the actual start day, not to mention time she’s put into clinics and that. I’m not saying she’s working as hard as if the season is going on currently but she put in a lot of extra time in the past few months, and still keeping in contact sending workouts etc....
Good on your wife, and let's hope all spring sports coaches get paid their full stipends. I really believe that, in most cases, that's what they're legally entitled to.
 

scbuckeye99

Active member
My district honored all spring sport supplements regardless. Down here in SC we were about 5 regular season baseball games in when IT hit the fan. So understandably track, softball, lax, baseball, boys tennis, soccer and boys golf coaches had completed their try out procedures, conducted pre-season contests and every sport my school fields had competed in a handful or so regular season contests.

One thing my district did that is cool is all the district custodians, bus drivers, cooks (anyone who is hourly) was told that they would continue to receive their regular paycheck regardless of work (my district shut down all campuses completely). Whether one likes it or not unlike the private sector public schools have that money regardless of schools closing or not. So rather than get all cheapskate and create a panic among the hourly sector of their staff the district office is continuing to pay them regardless. Now that's different than spring coach supplements I get that because for those hourly workers that is their 9-5 pay but again this coming from our District AD spring sport coaches would continue to get paid as well since the money is there regardless of pandemic or no pandemic.
 

playboi12

Active member
And I would think they are obligated since contract was signed. It’s not because the coach didn’t want to coach or quit... there is a national shut down. I think the coaches could fight the schools if they didn’t pay after the coaches started the season with practices and what not and then got shut down. I would hope the schools would honor the contracts in good faith. Any attorneys on here?
I am but I practice mostly in family law. But it appears that the contract can be voided due to it being impossible to perform. If anything, hopefully the coaches get paid up until the stoppage.
 

HSFB Fan

Well-known member
Coaches get between $1500 and 5K depending on years of service. These coaches have out of pocket expenses just like teachers in most cases every year.
As stated above, coaches have already attended meetings, required training worked to establish teams, built schedules etc.
The season is not yet cancelled so if by chance things get started back up in May coaches will be doing double duty with rescheduling games and getting teams ready to play. Many are working with other coaches to add in games should things start back up in May. If a district decides to not honor its contract that district will most likely be looking for coaches next season.
 

SMARTY22

Well-known member
The stipend/salary for Spring Coaches has already been accounted for this yr. The Coaches have still put in a quality amount of time/work. Common sense tells me these Coaches will be paid no matter what happens (short season,no season). The District that doesn’t Pay the Coaches who have put in the time/work will really look bad! This could lead to issues for Hiring Coaches for any Sport going forward.
 

grange45

Active member
The stipend/salary for Spring Coaches has already been accounted for this yr. The Coaches have still put in a quality amount of time/work. Common sense tells me these Coaches will be paid no matter what happens (short season,no season). The District that doesn’t Pay the Coaches who have put in the time/work will really look bad! This could lead to issues for Hiring Coaches for any Sport going forward.
Agree. This is a very rare situation that could only have negative consequences for future years to come for school districts retaining and hiring coaches if you don't uphold the contract and pay them. This is not the coach's fault and they did not breach the contract. They signed a contract to commit their time. Most the coaches I know work year round and attend other sports in the fall and winter to support the kids they coach.

Coaching stipends are peanuts when compared to the other costs of a school district. Each tax payer is losing out a pennies of what they pay each paycheck for coaches.
 

grange45

Active member
Really, maybe schools should start paying coaches hourly. The hourly minimum wage for a whole season (under normal circumstances) would be at least 10 times as much as they currently get. All coaches (unless they're lazy) have already met the stipend they are getting under their contract if you pay them hourly.

Schools should know right now that they are taking advantage of the system under normal circumstances with issuing contracts for coaches. The hours they put in is crazy and do not get paid enough.
 
Schools couldn't afford to pay any coach's by the hour, they would be bankrupted. It is practically a year round job now and most don't expect more pay as we do it for the love of each individual sport. Our rewards are not financial but the difference you made in a young persons life by improving them has human beings either athletically or having learned a life lesson. Not everything in life is about money.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
Really, maybe schools should start paying coaches hourly. The hourly minimum wage for a whole season (under normal circumstances) would be at least 10 times as much as they currently get. All coaches (unless they're lazy) have already met the stipend they are getting under their contract if you pay them hourly.

Schools should know right now that they are taking advantage of the system under normal circumstances with issuing contracts for coaches. The hours they put in is crazy and do not get paid enough.
That is pretty tough. No way to really hold anyone accountable, and I am not just talking on the coaches end of the spectrum. Admins could 'wink wink' extra hours to boost salary.

You dont do it for the money, you do it for the love of teaching the game.
 

grange45

Active member
That is pretty tough. No way to really hold anyone accountable, and I am not just talking on the coaches end of the spectrum. Admins could 'wink wink' extra hours to boost salary.

You dont do it for the money, you do it for the love of teaching the game.
I never said coaches do it for the money; they do it for the love of the sport and making a positive impact on students. They are definitely underpaid though for how much they do. There is no way you can disagree with that.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
I never said coaches do it for the money; they do it for the love of the sport and making a positive impact on students. They are definitely underpaid though for how much they do. There is no way you can disagree with that.
I concur.

Just saying it is very difficult to quantify hours put in, and could easily be taken advantage of on either side. Maybe a school does a 'wink wink' on hours, there is just no oversight.
As a coach, do you include all the time you are thinking about what to do in practice while you are at home? Scribbling down lineups while eating dinner? Txting to and from the assistants about a way forward? It is endless.
 
I concur.

Just saying it is very difficult to quantify hours put in, and could easily be taken advantage of on either side. Maybe a school does a 'wink wink' on hours, there is just no oversight.
As a coach, do you include all the time you are thinking about what to do in practice while you are at home? Scribbling down lineups while eating dinner? Txting to and from the assistants about a way forward? It is endless.
Are there any coaches in here that have heard if they are getting their stipend. I would assume most would know by now right?
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
Are there any coaches in here that have heard if they are getting their stipend. I would assume most would know by now right?
There was a coach on the track and XC forum who posted that his AD had notified all spring coaches that they would be receiving their full stipend. I assume other public schools will do the same. The tricky ones could be any of the private schools that have large amounts of families who haven't already paid their tuition in full.
 

grange45

Active member
There was a coach on the track and XC forum who posted that his AD had notified all spring coaches that they would be receiving their full stipend. I assume other public schools will do the same. The tricky ones could be any of the private schools that have large amounts of families who haven't already paid their tuition in full.
I really think this situation is going to hit private schools the most. They are getting paid not out of tax dollars that gets taken out of each paycheck without choice, they are paying tuition where they can just stop a payment. You can argue that college is the same way but if you stop paying, you have no education. The high school private school student just goes back to their public school district.

There will probably be another $1000000000 bill that will save them as well though.
 
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