Any bird brains out there?

chs1971

Well-known member
6-7 weeks


This source says as little as 5 weeks.

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ogealbhain

Well-known member
According to the Cornell Lab 6-7 weeks. Another source says as little as 5 weeks.

This is exactly where their nest was: "They typically place their nests in a broad-leaved tree (occasionally in a conifer), below the forest canopy but toward the tree top, usually in the crotch of the main trunk. Nest trees are often near a pond, stream, or swamp, and can be in suburban neighborhoods or parks. "

At first we thought it was a Coopers or Sharp-Shinned.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
This is exactly where their nest was: "They typically place their nests in a broad-leaved tree (occasionally in a conifer), below the forest canopy but toward the tree top, usually in the crotch of the main trunk. Nest trees are often near a pond, stream, or swamp, and can be in suburban neighborhoods or parks. "

At first we thought it was a Coopers or Sharp-Shinned.
Red-tailed are an open country bird and we see a lot more of them than Red-shouldered in the farmland of NW Ohio. I assume you are near a "pond, stream, or swamp?"

If you can ID a Coopers, Sharp-Shinned, and Red-shouldered I assume you do some kind of bird watching.
 

ogealbhain

Well-known member
Red-tailed are an open country bird and we see a lot more of them than Red-shouldered in the farmland of NW Ohio. I assume you are near a "pond, stream, or swamp?"

If you can ID a Coopers, Sharp-Shinned, and Red-shouldered I assume you do some kind of bird watching.
Stream across street from us. A little but someone online identified it as a red-shouldered.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I've a raining of nests falling out of trees. I don't know if it's the influx of crows trying to take out competitors or winds. But we've had winds without this many nest. No eggs in any of them. One is particularly spectacular. Like a fine winding nest inside the mud nest. Trying to figure out how to preserve it.
 

USA70PP

Well-known member
chs1971,
Your thoughts please. I find the average lifespan of a robin is two years, have lived to 14 and the population turns over about every 6 years. This year momma robin had two in the first clutch and only one in the second
Now she is back for a third time this season.
Could this be the same robin that had 5 four years ago and now is old and can only come up with one or two?
 

chs1971

Well-known member
chs1971,
Your thoughts please. I find the average lifespan of a robin is two years, have lived to 14 and the population turns over about every 6 years. This year momma robin had two in the first clutch and only one in the second
Now she is back for a third time this season.
Could this be the same robin that had 5 four years ago and now is old and can only come up with one or two?
I could not find anything specific about older robins, but generally older birds tend to lay more eggs than younger birds.

So I don't know.
 

covidsucks

Active member
I have two nesting bald eagles within 5 miles from my house. One flew over, was amazing, never knew the size. Thought I saw something prehistoric. Also, have seen several lazuras lizards or wall lizards. Very cool a lot of neat markings.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
I have two nesting bald eagles within 5 miles from my house. One flew over, was amazing, never knew the size. Thought I saw something prehistoric. Also, have seen several lazuras lizards or wall lizards. Very cool a lot of neat markings.
BE wing span up to 7 1/2 feet.

I find it hard to have a perspective on how big or small birds are until I am very close.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
Orioles made a return this week.


As did a redheaded wood pecker.

ON a good week a bald eagle or two will fly overhead!
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
I heard a thud on the back of my house last week and went to see what had happened. Found a dying mourning dove on my patio and a falcon sitting on my fence watching him. I suspect the dove's hasty escape took him right into the side of my house.

Years back, I was up on the coastline of Maine and watched a peregrine falcon go after a bald eagle flying up the coast. Apparently, the falcon thought the eagle had come too close to a nest. The falcon would climb to a couple feet above the eagle and would dive into him. They'd tumble and fight then the falcon would disengage and they'd do it all over again. It was amazing to watch. Despite the size difference, the falcon was the clear aggressor and winner. The eagle couldn't get out of there fast enough!
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Yep. Plenty of small birds have hit our house getting away from hawks, or shadows. Years ago we had a Red-tailed Hawk hit the house chasing a dove. That was a boom. Went outside and looked and there was an image of the hawk on the house from the dust that came off the feathers.

My son and I watched a Goshawk attack a migrating juvenile Golden Eagle in the UP. Same thing. My wife was using "the facilities" and missed it. Of course we told her all about it.

Have you ever seen a small bird land on the back of a raptor and start pecking on it's head?

The big bird will twist and turn to shake off it's attacker, and then the little bird comes back and takes a few more whacks.

Darn that's gotta hurt.
 
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eastisbest

Well-known member
I like these little starlings I think they are. They'll fly full speed through the chain link like on a dare. Sitting on the porch watching one and poof, just feathers. That's how quick the neighbor hawk took it. Occasionally see the eagles cruise by, they have nest at a nearby park but to chs1971's "how big," yeah they don't look that big until there's something to compare to. Saw in Alaska where bald eagles are essentially pigeons, one glide right over some small honda driving just in front. Yeah, they big.

Got dive bombed by a bat with 2 metre wing span. What you gonna do? Try not to look like a rat. Yeah I know, not a bird.

Personally of all the big birds, the most facsinating is the hummingbird. Could watch them all day.
 

arizonawildcat

Well-known member
I just spent the evening drinking on my patio and watching my bats (and I consider them my bats) fly off into the night and gobble up the local insects.
 

ogealbhain

Well-known member
Orioles made a return this week.


As did a redheaded wood pecker.

ON a good week a bald eagle or two will fly overhead!
My wife has tried attracting orioles but no luck. Overall bird count seems down. BUt have seen more bluebirds than ever.

Red-shouldered hawk's nest was blown out of tree a couple weeks back but neighbor thinks at least one of the fledglings made it.
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
We had orioles for the first time about a month ago, but I haven't seen them since. I think they were just passing through. Beautiful birds.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Don't think I've seen orioles. I thought those were the black birds with the red shoulders but when I googled, I was wrong. We get small pure yellow birds, kind of fun to watch. I think they're warblers.

I've seen downey woodpeckers. White and black stripes with a little red dot on the head. Egrets and hurons. Don't know if there are different types. Wood and mandarine ducks. Street flooded once, I came home to ducks swimming in my driveway.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
My wife has tried attracting orioles but no luck. Overall bird count seems down. BUt have seen more bluebirds than ever.

Red-shouldered hawk's nest was blown out of tree a couple weeks back but neighbor thinks at least one of the fledglings made it.
Orioles in your area are Democrats so they are all staying home cowering in fear of the Rona.
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
Don't think I've seen orioles. I thought those were the black birds with the red shoulders but when I googled, I was wrong. We get small pure yellow birds, kind of fun to watch. I think they're warblers.

I've seen downey woodpeckers. White and black stripes with a little red dot on the head. Egrets and hurons. Don't know if there are different types. Wood and mandarine ducks. Street flooded once, I came home to ducks swimming in my driveway.
Those are probably goldfinches. The red shoulders are red winged blackbirds.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Those are probably goldfinches.
Yeah maybe. I looked at pictures of both now and hard to tell. Bout the same size. The warblers are a bit smaller and prefer woods whereas the goldfinches prefer open terran (according to my quick google). I'm leaning towards warbler since that's where I see them, in a wetish, woody area.

Be easier if they'd carry signs.

Birds and wild plants are fascinating to me when I take the time to actually look at them. Wish I'd been a boy scout so I'd know what was what, when I'm looking at it. Might cut down on the rashes.

lol, no I don't. I would not have made a good boy scout.
 
BE wing span up to 7 1/2 feet.

I find it hard to have a perspective on how big or small birds are until I am very close.
BE wing span up to 7 1/2 feet.

I find it hard to have a perspective on how big or small birds are until I am very close.
Rodrigo the Red-winged Blackbird001_1592693333190.jpg

This is a photo of a Bald Eagle that I took in my back yard in Medina County two weeks ago. To its left is a Red-winged Black Bird, just to give some size perspective.

The Black Bird, while in flight before they both landed, momentarily jumped on the back of the Eagle while trying to protect its nest near by. Was awesome to see.

BTW, that is a gosling in the big bird's clutches. Apparently young goose was on the menu that day.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Yeah maybe. I looked at pictures of both now and hard to tell. Bout the same size. The warblers are a bit smaller and prefer woods whereas the goldfinches prefer open terran (according to my quick google). I'm leaning towards warbler since that's where I see them, in a wetish, woody area.

Be easier if they'd carry signs.
First, goldfinches are usually in small flocks. Except when migrating, warblers are not.

Second, listen.

When they fly goldfinches say "Po-ta-to-chip, po-ta-to-chip, po-ta-to-chip."

Yellow Warblers - "Sweet, sweet, I'm so sweet."

Common Yellowthroat - "Witchity, witchity, witchity."
 

chs1971

Well-known member
View attachment 7835

This is a photo of a Bald Eagle that I took in my back yard in Medina County two weeks ago. To its left is a Red-winged Black Bird, just to give some size perspective.

The Black Bird, while in flight before they both landed, momentarily jumped on the back of the Eagle while trying to protect its nest near by. Was awesome to see.

BTW, that is a gosling in the big bird's clutches. Apparently young goose was on the menu that day.
AWESOME.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
BTW, that is a gosling in the big bird's clutches. Apparently young goose was on the menu that day.
That eagle for hire?


First, goldfinches are usually in small flocks. Except when migrating, warblers are not.

Second, listen.

When they fly goldfinches say "Po-ta-to-chip, po-ta-to-chip, po-ta-to-chip."

Yellow Warblers - "Sweet, sweet, I'm so sweet."

Common Yellowthroat - "Witchity, witchity, witchity."
Great tips! These aren't in flocks but the chirps should nail it down for me.
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
I live on the edge of some woods and wetlands and have goldfinches. I guess I should look at my Ohio bird book to make sure they're not warblers!

That was the second time I had seen a falcon in my yard. 4 or 5 years ago one was in the middle of my back yard in the snow (by a feeder). I went out to scare him off. He just stared at me until I got to within about ten foot of him and slammed a snow shovel in the snow. They are really badasses. Around here, it's almost always the hawks. I had a couple over me today squawking at each other.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Great tips! These aren't in flocks but the chirps should nail it down for me.
By "small flocks" I mean maybe 4-6 birds. Warblers might be paired up male & female but they shouldn't be in a group.

There are thistle seed feeders specifically for goldfinches and they will feed all year.

Warblers normally eat insects and spiders. Some species will come to a feeder during migration.
 
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