2019-20 Mr Basketball Candidates

cdub4

New member
I was just saying I personally can't recall seeing a 30 point performance THIS season. I was asking if anyone has seen 40+ and how many times they've seen it...?
I have seen a few 30 pt games. I saw Hugley from Lyndhurst Brush score 32 and he scored 52 last week.
 

Smalls

Active member
I love the assist average - 4.1 for a big man.


The 6’9”, 240-pound power forward has been an absolute force on offense, as he is averaging 22.9 points, 15.5 rebounds and 4.1 assists. He has also managed to shoot over 40 percent from three-point range. In addition, he has been a fierce rim-protector, with 1.6 blocks per game in the 2019-20 season.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I love the assist average - 4.1 for a big man.


The 6’9”, 240-pound power forward has been an absolute force on offense, as he is averaging 22.9 points, 15.5 rebounds and 4.1 assists. He has also managed to shoot over 40 percent from three-point range. In addition, he has been a fierce rim-protector, with 1.6 blocks per game in the 2019-20 season.
that's impressive. Good passing post in high school. Doesn't happen everyday.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
This is a discussion about the merits of potential candidates for Mr. Basketball- saying that discussions/comparisons about the player is “unwarranted criticism” is rather soft.
Wanting to change it to have a winner in each division is even worse. There is already player of the year in each division- this is a special honor that has different criteria.
How is it comparison if they're automatically tossed because they're in lower division? They're cursed because of where they're born? There's more than a few higher division Mr. Basketball winners in this state on the missing person's list. I don't think division has to have a play in someone's vote.

Does "Mr. Basketball" even have an official definition?
 

Smalls

Active member
It is tough to win coming from a small high school and going to a non-D1 college. The only non D1 college player to win Mr. Basketball was Fritts - but he played for a big high school.

Admittedly, it is not every year that we have the 2nd All Time scorer in the state up for the award. Could we see a tie like 2000?


2018 — Dane Goodwin, Upper Arlington, 6-5, sr., Averaged 24 points, 10 rebounds per game. School record 1,951 points, 817 rebounds. Notre Dame.

2017 — Kaleb Wesson, Westerville South, 6-10, sr., Averaged 22 points, 12 rebounds per game. Ohio State.

2016 — Xavier Simpson, Lima Senior, 6-0, sr.. Averaged 27.2 points, 6.1 assists, 3.8 steals per game. Played first two years at Lima Central Catholic. Scored 1,946 career points. Had 59 and 65-point games. Michigan.

2015 — Luke Kennard, Franklin, 6-6, sr. Averaged 38.1 points, 9.7 rebounds, 4.8 assists and 2.2 steals per game. Scored 50 or more points in five games. With 2,977 career points he became the No. 2 scorer in Ohio behind 2007 winner Jon Diebler’s 3,208. Duke University.

2014 — Luke Kennard, Franklin, 6-6, jr. Averaged 41.0 points, 10.4 rebounds, 4 assists, 2 steals per game. Scored 50 or more points in three games. Shot 42 percent behind the arc and 85 percent at the line. Team won 36 straight league games with him in the lineup. Also an All-Ohio quarterback.

2013 — Marc Loving, Tol. St. John’s, 6-8, sr. Averaged 21.3 points, 8.2 rebounds, 2 assists per game while shooting 60 percent from the field, 30 percent on 3-pointers and 70 percent at the line. Two-time player of the year in the division. Team went 20-4. Ohio State.

2012 — Justin Fritts, Mentor, 6-2, sr. Averaged 28.1 points, 8 rebounds, 3.7 steals and 2.9 assists a game. Second-team All-Ohio as a junior, first-team as a senior. Led team to regional tournament. Wheeling Jesuit.

2011 — Trey Burke, Columbus Northland, 6-1, sr. Averaged 23.9 points, 6.6 assists, 2.9 rebounds and 2.2 steals in the regular season while shooting 61 percent from the field — 48 percent from three-point range (39 of 81). He shot 70 percent at the line. He led Northland to a 19-1 record and the state tournament for the third time in his four seasons. In his four years, three as a starter, Burke’s teams lost only five games, with a state title, a state semifinalist and a regional runner-up. Northland becomes the first high school represented by two Mr. Basketball winners. Michigan. Big Ten freshman of the year.

2010 — Jared Sullinger, Columbus Northland, 6-9, sr. Averaged 24.5 points, 12.3 rebounds, 3 blocked shots, 2.4 assists a game while shooting 78 percent from the field, 38 percent on 3-pointers and 77 percent on free throws. Becomes fifth player to win the award twice. Won AP regular-season poll title, team ranked No. 1 in nation by USA Today, before upset loss in regional finals. Ohio State. Consensus first-team All-America and national and Big Ten freshman of the year.


2009 — Jared Sullinger, Columbus Northland, 6-9, junior. Averaged 19.9 points, 14.8 rebounds while shooting 67 percent from the field for the state’s No. 1 team in Division I. Led Northland to state championship.

2008 — William Buford, Toledo Libbey, 6-5, sr. Averaged 22.9 points, 11.1 rebounds, 5.6 assist a game. Led team to state semifinals in Division II and a 23-2 record. Three-time Toledo City League player of the year. McDonald’s All-American. Shot 62 percent from the field, 46 percent on 3-pointers and 77 percent at the line. 2,000 career points. Ohio State. Was Big Ten freshman of the year.

2007 — Jon Diebler, Upper Sandusky, 6-7, sr. Averaged 42.7 points a game while scoring 3,208 career points to break Jay Burson’s record to become leading Ohio high school player. Also averaged 13.5 points, 7 assists, 5.2 steals and 4.7 blocked shots. Helped team win state championship his sophomore season and play in finals his senior year. Ohio State.

2006 — O.J. Mayo, Cincinnati North College Hill, 6-5, jr. Averaged 28.8 points, 8.8 rebounds, 5.8 assists and 5 steals for team ranked No. 1 in state for the third year in a row which went on to win second straight state title. Only loss was to national power Oak Hill (Va.) Academy before more than 16,000 in Cincinnati. Led Trojans back to state title defense. Becomes only fourth player to win Mr. Basketball more than once, joining Jim Jackson, Greg Simpson and LeBron James. Transferred to Huntington, W.Va., after the season. Southern Cal. NBA.

2005 — O.J. Mayo, Cincinnati North College Hill, 6-5, soph. Averaged 28.9 points, 7.8 rebounds, 7.7 assists and 3.4 steals for team ranked No. 1 in state both of his varsity seasons. Becomes only second sophomore to win the award, behind LeBron James. Led North College Hill to first state tournament appearance in 16 years, and first state championship.

2004 — Jamar Butler, Lima Shawnee, 6-2, sr. Averaged 31.6 points, 8.3 assists, 5.8 rebounds, 2.6 steals per game while shooting 44 percent from the field, 37 percent on 3-pointers. Scored more than 2,400 points in his career, 10th best all-time in Ohio. Ohio State.

2003 — LeBron James, Akron St. Vincent-St. Mary, 6-8, sr. Averaged 31.6 points, 9.6 rebounds, 4.6 assists and 3.4 steals a game. First three-time Mr. Basketball winner. Led team to fourth straight state tournament appearance. Won Division II title. Drafted with the first pick of the 2003 NBA draft by the Cleveland Cavaliers. Miami Heat.


2002 — LeBron James, Akron St. Vincent-St. Mary, 6-foot-7, jr. Averaged 29 points, 8.3 rebounds, 5.7 assists and 3.3 steals a game while shooting 63 percent from the field. Third two-time Mr. Basketball winner. Led team to third straight state tournament appearance. Won Division III title as freshman and sophomore.

2001 — LeBron James, Akron St. Vincent-St. Mary, 6-6 1/?2, soph., 25.6 points, 7.5 rebounds, 7.0 assists per game. First sophomore to win Mr. Basketball award.

2000 — (tie) Tony Stockman, Medina, 6-2, sr., 25.4 points, 6.1 assists, 4.7 rebounds, 3.2 steals per game; 50.5 percent field goals, 84.3 percent free throws, 39.7 percent 3-pointers; Clemson, then Ohio State. And Chester Mason, Cleveland South, 6-3, sr., 25 points, 13 rebounds, 11 assists per game. Miami (Ohio)

1999 — Emmanuel Smith, Euclid, 6-3, sr., 28.4 points, 8.3 rebounds, 3.5 assists, 4.5 steals a game. Akron.

1998 — William “Sonny” Johnson, Garfield Hts., 6-5, sr., 34.0 points, 17.6 rebounds per game. Cleveland State, Ohio University.

1997 — Kenny Gregory, Columbus Independence, 6-4, sr., 25.1 points, 6.6 rebounds, 3.1 assists, 1.8 steals per game; 64.7 percent from the field, 43.2 percent 3-pointers. Kansas.

1996 — Jason Collier, Springfield Cath. Cent., 7-0, sr., 25.3 points, 13.4 rebounds, 6.6 blocked shots, 4.8 assists per game; 62.1 percent field goals, 37 percent 3-pointers. Indiana, then Georgia Tech. NBA. Died in 2005.


1995 — Damon Stringer, Cleveland Hts., 5-11, sr., 24.5 points, 7 assists, 5 steals per game. Ohio State.

1994 — Aaron Hutchins, Lima Central Catholic, 5-10, sr., 25.8 points, 7.8 assists, 5.1 steals per game; 61 percent field goal, 57 percent 3-pointers, 82 percent free throws. Marquette.

1993 — Geno Ford, Cambridge, 5-9, sr., 35.9 points, 4.5 rebounds, 4.5 assists per game; 2,680 career points, second highest in Ohio. Ohio University. Now head coach at Bradley.

1992 — Greg Simpson, Lima Senior, 6-1, sr., 35.3 points, 6.7 rebounds, 5.6 assists, 3.1 steals per game; 52.9 percent field goal, 51 percent 3-pointers, 77.4 percent free throws; 45 or more points six times; final 10 games averaged 41 points on 59 percent shooting. Ohio State.

1991 — Greg Simpson, Lima Senior, 6-1, jr., 32.3 points, 6.7 rebounds, 6.7 assists, 5.1 steals per game; 50.2 percent field goals, 47.2 percent 3-pointers, 72 percent free throws; 13 games with more than 30 points.

1990 — Bob Patton, Youngstown Liberty, 6-0, sr., 21.6 points, 8.3 assists, 4 rebounds per game; 62 percent field goal, 88 percent free throw percentage. Stanford.

1989 — Jim Jackson, Toledo Macomber, 6-6, sr., 31.5 points, 11.2 rebounds, 6.2 assists, 3 steals per game. Ohio State. NBA.

1988 — Jim Jackson, Toledo Macomber, 6-6, jr., 26.7 points per game.
 
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Blue and White

New member
Per social media:

Zach Rasile is the first player in OHSAA history to make over 100 3 point field goals in 4 straight seasons


He is quickly approaching 3,000 career points
 

Insane92

Active member
In my opinion I would say Div II #1 Lima Shawnee’s George Mangas, he is averaging 30+ppg and he is on the verge of leading his team to a undefeated season and a league title.
Not this year but he is in my top 5 for next year for Mr. Basketball if he keeps putting up these numbers and they make a tourney run like it looks like they wil.
 

Smalls

Active member
Stole this from the 25+ point scorers thread;

Nehemiah Benson (Lutheran East) 60 pts in 124-75 win over Cleveland John Hay. Was 26/34 from the floor.

One of the games I mentioned when you can name the score and how many points someone with good talent can score. "If" Lutheran East didn't play a strong schedule he could do that night in and night out.

.....and he did it in 23 minutes or he could of scored 80.
 
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Stole this from the 25+ point scorers thread;

Nehemiah Benson (Lutheran East) 60 pts in 124-75 win over Cleveland John Hay. Was 26/34 from the floor.

One of the games I mentioned when you can name the score and how many points someone with good talent can score. "If" Lutheran East didn't play a strong schedule he could do that night in and night out.

.....and he did it in 23 minutes or he could of scored 80.
Exactly . . . I think Benson had 8 points against Moeller. You can't give it to a non-D1 college kid that plays against bad competition.
 

Smalls

Active member
Exactly . . . I think Benson had 8 points against Moeller. You can't give it to a non-D1 college kid that plays against bad competition.
And it is not just the ability to score, it is the ability to even take a shot. Vs Moeller he was 3/5 from the field 2/2 from the foul line and he is a very talented player. Good teams won't let anyone be a high volume shooter.
 
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D4fan

Well-known member
How is it comparison if they're automatically tossed because they're in lower division? They're cursed because of where they're born? There's more than a few higher division Mr. Basketball winners in this state on the missing person's list. I don't think division has to have a play in someone's vote.

Does "Mr. Basketball" even have an official definition?
I dont think they are automatically tossed because they are in a lower division, but in my mind, the lower division candidate should be a high D1 caliber player to get serious consideration.

A guard 6'0 or under who seldom sees a defense with players who are 6"4 - 6'10" may not be capable of dominating a game at the next level. To me, this selection is about such an individual.

I would feel comfortable with a D4 power forward who was 6'8" and dominated on both ends of the floor AND WAS HEADED TO A TOP D1 UNIVERSITY AFTER HIGH SCHOOL being considered. 6'0" guards can dominate D4 ball but will see a drastic drop off typically when they get surrounded by much larger bodies such as a typical D1 program.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I dont think they are automatically tossed because they are in a lower division, but in my mind, the lower division candidate should be a high D1 caliber player to get serious consideration.

A guard 6'0 or under who seldom sees a defense with players who are 6"4 - 6'10" may not be capable of dominating a game at the next level. To me, this selection is about such an individual.
You mean sees a team like Crestview? DI players rarely see a defense filled with 6"4 - 6'10" and if they do, they probably have a few on thier side of the ball to help them help. You are effectly tossing them if their in the far majority lower division school, leaving only the create a teams like the Mayo N. College Hill. But to each their own.

I miss the old non-division championships in Indiana where you got those small farm school, large school match-ups. To ME, a ball player is a ball player. Mr. Basketball doesn't have to be most likely to go to the NBA finals. He and she have to best know the game, represent the game.

Is there even a written definition of the award?
 
Stole this from the 25+ point scorers thread;

Nehemiah Benson (Lutheran East) 60 pts in 124-75 win over Cleveland John Hay. Was 26/34 from the floor.

One of the games I mentioned when you can name the score and how many points someone with good talent can score. "If" Lutheran East didn't play a strong schedule he could do that night in and night out.

.....and he did it in 23 minutes or he could of scored 80.
So Rasile gets discredited for scoring 40 points in a game that his team scores 80 in and wins by 30-35 points......but this kids gets credit for scoring 60 for a team that scored 124 points in the game...... oh ok, got it! ;)
 
I dont think they are automatically tossed because they are in a lower division, but in my mind, the lower division candidate should be a high D1 caliber player to get serious consideration.

A guard 6'0 or under who seldom sees a defense with players who are 6"4 - 6'10" may not be capable of dominating a game at the next level. To me, this selection is about such an individual.

I would feel comfortable with a D4 power forward who was 6'8" and dominated on both ends of the floor AND WAS HEADED TO A TOP D1 UNIVERSITY AFTER HIGH SCHOOL being considered. 6'0" guards can dominate D4 ball but will see a drastic drop off typically when they get surrounded by much larger bodies such as a typical D1 program.
This player that you would feel comfortable with - more than likely the ONLY reason he's going D1 is because he's 6'8".....
 
And it is not just the ability to score, it is the ability to even take a shot. Vs Moeller he was 3/5 from the field 2/2 from the foul line and he is a very talented player. Good teams won't let anyone be a high volume shooter.
y'all comparing players stats when these players play the best team in the state regardless of division......seems like not a great comparison tool then right?! I think all you've done is show that Moeller is REALLY REALLY good....
 
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Last thing - @Smalls, nothing but respect - every argument you've made on here has at least some information along with it to back it up. Not on here just spewing nonsense like some folks. We agree to disagree is all! 👊
 
So Rasile gets discredited for scoring 40 points in a game that his team scores 80 in and wins by 30-35 points......but this kids gets credit for scoring 60 for a team that scored 124 points in the game...... oh ok, got it! ;)
Way to miss the entire point of his post . . . the point was that really good players like Benson would score 40+ every game if they played a schedule like Rasile does. So point being his stats are inflated bc of strength of schedule. One final point is where did Rasile play AAU? I would have thought one of the shoe teams would have picked up this once in a lifetime shooter.
 

Smalls

Active member
So Rasile gets discredited for scoring 40 points in a game that his team scores 80 in and wins by 30-35 points......but this kids gets credit for scoring 60 for a team that scored 124 points in the game...... oh ok, got it! ;)
No that is the opposite of why I posted that. I think the points are hollow.

My point is it is silly to compare stats between players who play against solid competition and players who light it up against terrible teams. It doesn't mean they aren't good to great players or that they wouldn't be able to compete against other top players/teams.

I am saying if you play beside good players vs good competition your numbers could be cut in half, even with an excellent shooting % because your teammates take some of your shots and the other team is better able to guard you and take many of the open looks away.

When good players play bad teams and the game plan revolves around that good player they can name the score and how many points they score. That is how someone can score 60 one night and 8 on another. Benson wanted to score 60 against Moeller, but Moeller had other ideas and Moeller has the talent to slow him up. Youngstown East (4-17) wanted to slow Rasile up but they didn't have the talent to do so.

Many of the top players in the state do not have any Youngstown Easts on their schedule. McDonald has 16-18 of them on their schedule.

I give Rasile credit for being able to do it night in and night out, year in and year out without off the charts size or athleticism. He is not Shaq'ing his way to the rim.
 
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330sportsfan88

New member
I don’t understand why the entire McDonald community is keeping this going. The kid can play we get it, nobody is saying he can’t. But he’s on a division 4 team that isn’t even ranked?! Plus its impossible to take that schedule seriously, and if you do you’re from McDonald. In the high school basketball I watch, (D1, federal league) if you make 5 threes your chances are getting another shot off are pretty slim, he’s playing against kids that aren’t even capable of stopping him from shooting
 

Insane92

Active member
I see a lot of 6'8" even at the D2 and D3 college level. I am not aware of any D1's taking 6'8" projects. 6'10-7'+ projects maybe.
Plenty of D1's take 6'8 projects too who have some traits they want such as length, athleticism, shooting ability, etc but you have to be elite in those departments. Univ. of Cincy signed Tre Scott who is a 6'8 SF and barely anyone else was on him but he had elite athleticism even though he wasn't an offensive threat but he is a great all around player now for them.
 

Smalls

Active member
Plenty of D1's take 6'8 projects too who have some traits they want such as length, athleticism, shooting ability, etc but you have to be elite in those departments. Univ. of Cincy signed Tre Scott who is a 6'8 SF and barely anyone else was on him but he had elite athleticism even though he wasn't an offensive threat but he is a great all around player now for them.

I get what you are saying but he is a bad example. I think he was red-shirted to work in the weight room, more so than anything else. You can't get away with just speed and athleticism playing on the interior, it is like red-shirting an offensive lineman to pack on strength and weight;


The 6'7, 203-pounder chose the Bearcats over offers from Alabama, Clemson, Florida Atlantic, George Mason, Georgia, Georgia Southern, La Salle, UAB and Western Kentucky. The in-state Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets were also showing interest in Scott.

The Mcintosh County Academy (GA) prospect is a three-star prospect in the 2015 class. According to the 247Sports Composite scale, Scott is the 225th overall player in the country, the 59th player at his position and the 15th overall player in the loaded state of Georgia.
 
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Insane92

Active member
I get what you are saying but he is a bad example;


The 6'7, 203-pounder chose the Bearcats over offers from Alabama, Clemson, Florida Atlantic, George Mason, Georgia, Georgia Southern, La Salle, UAB and Western Kentucky. The in-state Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets were also showing interest in Scott.

The Mcintosh County Academy (GA) prospect is a three-star prospect in the 2015 class. According to the 247Sports Composite scale, Scott is the 225th overall player in the country, the 59th player at his position and the 15th overall player in the loaded state of Georgia.
How is it a bad example though? Those other schools could have offered him for the exact same reason and potential they saw. Lots of offers do not mean they are ready to play ASAP.
 

Smalls

Active member
^^^added to my post above. Needed strength. A top 225 recruit with ACC and SEC offers is more than a project. There are something like 347 D1 schools a majority at which he would have started for as a freshman.
 
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