When will we see our next 4 time state champ

Old142

Active member
If its true that some of the 4x’ers won a title because of a “down year“, could it also be true that the weight class had a “down year“ precisely because they were in it? In other words, athletes cut down or bumped up to avoid them.
Not if the year they won their first was at 103-106...which is OFTEN. Moving up a weight is tougher at the lightest weight based on % of weight, and they certainly aren't going down.
 

bucksman

Moderator
Marcus Blaze, he's the real deal. I'd be shocked if he loses a high school match in his career.
I won't. There's always the behemoth of Ironman.
At this year's Ironman, he was tied 1-1 in the third in the semis before penalty points decided that match; then the final went to 30/30 and a marginal takedown at the edge right before time was out against a fellow underclassman.
 

bucksman

Moderator
I don't want to bore people to death, but the simple fact that Ohio has three divisions right now has enhanced the number of four timers.

2010 - OH 103 - D1 has Heil & DiCamillo, D2 has Ryan Taylor, D3 has Tomasello. Those four kids were all nationally elite. Heil and Tomasello end up 4x state champs - if the classifications were different, there would be less. Pretty hard to deny that.

2007 - OH 103 - D1 has White, Clark, & Robinson; D2 has David Taylor; D3 has Logan Stieber. This opening weight class has five national level kids in it, the opening weight this year has one (Beric Jordan), and that's it.

There are different climates every year.
 

Divided42

Well-known member
Sure on balance D1 is deeper than D3, and obviously having 3 divisions gives more opportunities for more total championships but I think Logan Stieber , Chris Phillips, Hunter Stieber, Cam Tessari, David Carr (freshman), Kaleb Romero, likely would have won D1 4x as well.
Well Logan Stieber’s frosh year he would have had David Taylor in his weight class in D2 so one of them wouldn’t be a 4 timer. In D1 he would have had Sammy White and Jamie Clarke, where he would be definite favorite but not a foregone conclusion that he wins over both of them as both were extremely good. In Cam Tessari’s frosh year he would have had junior David Taylor in D2, he ain’t winning that, and sophomore Jamie Clarke in D1 he would be a decided underdog in that one. Just 2 for instances
 
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bucksman

Moderator
Romero 138 in 2014 is Kyle Lawson in D2, so no guarantee; 152 in 2015 is Kyle Lawson again in D2 with Rahmani in D1.

Carr 138 in D3 back in 2015 - in D1, Demas won that state title, so there is no guarantee he wins that bout. I recall Carr going OT to beat Screptock in the 12/2014 Brecksville final.
 

Old142

Active member
I don't want to bore people to death, but the simple fact that Ohio has three divisions right now has enhanced the number of four timers.

2010 - OH 103 - D1 has Heil & DiCamillo, D2 has Ryan Taylor, D3 has Tomasello. Those four kids were all nationally elite. Heil and Tomasello end up 4x state champs - if the classifications were different, there would be less. Pretty hard to deny that.

2007 - OH 103 - D1 has White, Clark, & Robinson; D2 has David Taylor; D3 has Logan Stieber. This opening weight class has five national level kids in it, the opening weight this year has one (Beric Jordan), and that's it.

There are different climates every year.
Ohio's good enough of a wrestling state to have more than 1 Divisional champ, IMO go back to the 70's 2 Divisions AAA-and A-AA combined. Three is a bit much, then at the end of the season have the 2 state champs each division compete, it will sell out. David Taylor likely the best 4 xer out of Ohio all time , his results in the Ironman and National ranking fortify that opinion. I'm not counting college career because thats a different animal, not all Elite guys choose to continue putting wrestling first after High school. Would he have won 4 titles against the best ever each season, each weight class before him ? Doubtful, but he would likely be the most capable of doing that of any 4 xer there is.
 

rocco

Active member
Ohio's good enough of a wrestling state to have more than 1 Divisional champ, IMO go back to the 70's 2 Divisions AAA-and A-AA combined. Three is a bit much, then at the end of the season have the 2 state champs each division compete, it will sell out. David Taylor likely the best 4 xer out of Ohio all time , his results in the Ironman and National ranking fortify that opinion. I'm not counting college career because thats a different animal, not all Elite guys choose to continue putting wrestling first after High school. Would he have won 4 titles against the best ever each season, each weight class before him ? Doubtful, but he would likely be the most capable of doing that of any 4 xer there is.
he literally beat d1 4 timer after he bumped up a weight
 

tennman

Active member
Things could get very interesting in the lighter weights of D2.... pretty sure there will be an absolute hammer transfer in from a different division for next season.
 

Old142

Active member
The best freshman are the ones who place or win at the big boy weights, like Shumate. A well respected coach said the field is loaded with studs when you get around 132-195.
LOL Many years 112...119...and 125 NATIONALLY were the NUMBER 1 ranked weight classes in the country . This is based on national rankings of ELITE numbers in a particular weight class. The talent pool is LESS at the higher weights...170 and above, you have no clue what you're talking about.
 

SPGT

Member
LOL Many years 112...119...and 125 NATIONALLY were the NUMBER 1 ranked weight classes in the country . This is based on national rankings of ELITE numbers in a particular weight class. The talent pool is LESS at the higher weights...170 and above, you have no clue what you're talking about.
Say that a little louder for the folks in the back! 😉
 

Justbecause

New member
The best freshman are the ones who place or win at the big boy weights, like Shumate. A well respected coach said the field is loaded with studs when you get around
126-144 are toughest / deepest…learn to wrestle like a light weight and get bigger to compete with less depth in competition (excluding the top couple kids / hammers in each weight. (Examples: Conley, fishback, shumate)
 

Old142

Active member
126-144 are toughest / deepest…learn to wrestle like a light weight and get bigger to compete with less depth in competition (excluding the top couple kids / hammers in each weight. (Examples: Conley, fishback, shumate)
Agreed the middle weights OFTEN are the toughest to compete in due to the amount of talent based on average size. But 125 has had quite a few hodge awards, and is also OFTEN the most competitive weight, 125 pounders coming from 106 112 119 125 High school elite.
 

BigH

Member
126-144 are toughest / deepest…learn to wrestle like a light weight and get bigger to compete with less depth in competition (excluding the top couple kids / hammers in each weight. (Examples: Conley, fishback, shumate)
Agree I would say that 126-157 are usually the toughest weights because most of the kids wrestling at those weights are only wrestling look at 165 and up many of those kids are playing football you will have your anomaly's like fishback and shumate.
 
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