Vince Catino

 
3.9, you have got to be kidding me, the fastest NFL player in HISTORY to be recorded in the forty is 4.1, there is no way in ---- that a junior in highschool or anyone on the high school level can run a 3.9, if he could run a 4.2 he would be recruited by every college team in the world, because skill can be taught, speed cant... hes fast...but not that fast
 
It is impossible to know for sure because vince has never ran a 40 before, but for anybody who wants to know, moeller is timing players in the 40 this saturday so i will post the time when i get a chance
 
A little perspective on the 40 yard dash.

Say someone runs a hand-timed 4.35. The accepted standard to convert a hand-timed event to an automatically timed equivilent is to round up to the nearest tenth, in this example you would round to 4.4, and then add .24 seconds - now you're at 4.64. Reaction time to the athlete's starting motion can range from .15 to .2 - giving you a potential "actual" 40 time of 4.79 to 4.84.

Not to mention the difference of starting the watch with your thumb (slower reaction time) vs. your index finger - adding another potential .15 seconds - now the habd-timed 4.35 could be a 4.99 equivilent

Ben Johnson of Olympic sprinting fame - ran a 4.38

Good-luck on Saturday

here is the article that info is from http://www.usolympicteam.com/11611_32384.htm

it puts the 40 into better perspective
 
3.9, you have got to be kidding me, the fastest NFL player in HISTORY to be recorded in the forty is 4.1, there is no way in ---- that a junior in highschool or anyone on the high school level can run a 3.9, if he could run a 4.2 he would be recruited by every college team in the world, because skill can be taught, speed cant... hes fast...but not that fast

dude he ran a 3.9. i was there.
 
It is impossible to know for sure because vince has never ran a 40 before, but for anybody who wants to know, moeller is timing players in the 40 this saturday so i will post the time when i get a chance

Do you know if a coach is timing it? If so, I've never really trusted lacrosse coaches timings.
 
Also, you need to take into account the conditions in which the 40 was run such as the type of surface, the weather, etc.
 
A little perspective on the 40 yard dash (from www.usolympicteam.com)

Say someone runs a hand-timed 4.35. The accepted standard to convert a hand-timed event to an automatically timed equivilent is to round up to the nearest tenth, in this example you would round to 4.4, and then add .24 seconds - now you're at 4.64. Reaction time to the athlete's starting motion can range from .15 to .2 - giving you a potential "actual" 40 time of 4.79 to 4.84.

Not to mention the difference of starting the watch with your thumb (slower reaction time) vs. your index finger - adding another potential .15 seconds - now the hand-timed 4.35 could be a 4.99 equivilent

Ben Johnson of Olympic sprinting fame - ran a 4.38 (calculated)

Good-luck on Saturday

Ben Johnson was timed from the start of the gun. In the forty is started when your first movement is, this would mean Johnson's time was in between 4.1-4.2 if was timed from his first movement. Second of all there are probably many very high-caliber athletes that can run nearly that fast in the forty. The difference is that Ben Johnson could achieve and maintain a higher top-end speed. That is what separates a great forty runner from an Olympic 100 meter runner, top-end speed. Plus the reason the hand time is rounded up and added .24 seconds is the reasons you have stated, you don't add it twice.
 
from what i've heard, Edwards is applying to prep schools now and if he plays at one he is guaranteed playing at Dartmouth
 
3.9, you have got to be kidding me, the fastest NFL player in HISTORY to be recorded in the forty is 4.1, there is no way in ---- that a junior in highschool or anyone on the high school level can run a 3.9, if he could run a 4.2 he would be recruited by every college team in the world, because skill can be taught, speed cant... hes fast...but not that fast

Maybe he's running down hill. :shrug:
 
You can "teach" speed, believe it or not. There's certain starting techniques and running forms that increase your overall speed in the 40, or even in a normal game.

You still have to have natural ability to have speed. I'm sure you can teach technique for the 40 but that's not teaching speed. Improving your starting and running form isn't going to dramatically improve your 40 time. Some people are built for sprinting and some are built for long distances. And I seriously doubt Vince Catino ran a 3.9. Calvin Johnson ran a 4.35 at the combine and Gary Pride from Colerain ran a 4.3 at Akron's football camp.
 
I understand what you're saying, but I have to disagree on some. For instance, you can shave off at most .1 off of your 40 time from a correct start alone, which is a huge difference (4.9 to a 4.8). Then, the correct posture, such as your head level, proper foot placement (stride), and arm elevation can reduce it by .05 (4.8 - 4.75).

If you can carry over such form like your arm elevation and stride over to the game field, you have become faster. Also, the correct drop in your hip level when cutting/changing direction can cause your agility to sky-rocket.

You are right, however, in saying that you need natural ability to have speed.
 
I understand what you're saying, but I have to disagree on some. For instance, you can shave off at most .1 off of your 40 time from a correct start alone, which is a huge difference (4.9 to a 4.8). Then, the correct posture, such as your head level, proper foot placement (stride), and arm elevation can reduce it by .05 (4.8 - 4.75).

If you can carry over such form like your arm elevation and stride over to the game field, you have become faster. Also, the correct drop in your hip level when cutting/changing direction can cause your agility to sky-rocket.

You are right, however, in saying that you need natural ability to have speed.

If you aren't built right or haven't practiced running shaving 1.5 off of a 5. something isn't really a big deal.
 
Top