Moeller gets New AD!

scbuckeye99

Well-known member
How can he judge coaches when he's never walked in their shoes? How can he advise them ?

In my experience (coach for 17 years, Assistant AD for 7) schools (large schools at least) have to or need to hire someone who is probably more concerned with the business aspect of their athletic departments than they are with the coaching evaluations. I've seen guys / gals I've worked with and coached against who couldn't coach their team out of a paper bag but were great fundraisers and hype men / women who have become AD's recently. The position of AD in our high schools is slowly becoming more salesman than administrator.
 

UCArch

Active member
In my experience (coach for 17 years, Assistant AD for 7) schools (large schools at least) have to or need to hire someone who is probably more concerned with the business aspect of their athletic departments than they are with the coaching evaluations. I've seen guys / gals I've worked with and coached against who couldn't coach their team out of a paper bag but were great fundraisers and hype men / women who have become AD's recently. The position of AD in our high schools is slowly becoming more salesman than administrator.
Very much agree - there’s no reason for heads of the athletic departments to have their main job to be “supervising” at every game. Their time could be spent doing much more strategic things.

They can always get help for the administrative functions of scheduling. They can be key decision makers and negotiators, but give the busy work to someone else.

But if schools decide to do that, the skill set for the more strategic AD is much different than the typical AD. Definitely requires a different type of hire. I applaud Moeller for trying something new and progressive, a lot of schools love to stand pat and keep doing things the same way.
 

scbuckeye99

Well-known member
Very much agree - there’s no reason for heads of the athletic departments to have their main job to be “supervising” at every game. Their time could be spent doing much more strategic things.

They can always get help for the administrative functions of scheduling. They can be key decision makers and negotiators, but give the busy work to someone else.

But if schools decide to do that, the skill set for the more strategic AD is much different than the typical AD. Definitely requires a different type of hire. I applaud Moeller for trying something new and progressive, a lot of schools love to stand pat and keep doing things the same way.

AD's at large schools have become far more CEO than anything else. Our AD supervises an athletic department budget of roughly $200k while our building principal only has to oversee an academic budget of $100k. In many respects the AD at your school becomes more visible than the man or woman who runs the entire school.
 
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Redandgold

Active member
AD’s number one job should be hiring coaches and evaluating coaches. You need to be in the game to do that. Managing a couple hundred thousand dollar athletic budget doesn’t require a business degree, and certainly not a law degree. This guy is going to sit in judgement of a coach?? That’s insulting to real coaches. The school has a business manager I would think, and probably a slew of lawyers that they use from time to time. This is just Moeller trying to be on the cutting edge. They couldn’t find the AD they wanted, so they came up with this. Just my guess.
 
AD’s number one job should be hiring coaches and evaluating coaches. You need to be in the game to do that. Managing a couple hundred thousand dollar athletic budget doesn’t require a business degree, and certainly not a law degree. This guy is going to sit in judgement of a coach?? That’s insulting to real coaches. The school has a business manager I would think, and probably a slew of lawyers that they use from time to time. This is just Moeller trying to be on the cutting edge. They couldn’t find the AD they wanted, so they came up with this. Just my guess.

"they couldn't find the guy they wanted". Just your guess?
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
In my experience (coach for 17 years, Assistant AD for 7) schools (large schools at least) have to or need to hire someone who is probably more concerned with the business aspect of their athletic departments than they are with the coaching evaluations. I've seen guys / gals I've worked with and coached against who couldn't coach their team out of a paper bag but were great fundraisers and hype men / women who have become AD's recently. The position of AD in our high schools is slowly becoming more salesman than administrator.
Probably if possible, there might be help with some of the administrative function of the job. Facilities and how to finance improvements outside of a levy is becoming a huge part of an AD's job.
 

birdog

Well-known member
Probably if possible, there might be help with some of the administrative function of the job. Facilities and how to finance improvements outside of a levy is becoming a huge part of an AD's job.
Especially since private schools can't schedule a levy and instead require sound fiscal management and fund raising capabilities. In this particular case Moeller has the support staff in place to assist with scheduling, game prep and ancillary duties and responsibilities. GBM
 

UCArch

Active member
I would also think an AD job isn’t all that attractive to those really wanting to make a difference if they know they have to spend most of their time sitting at a track meet or a wrestling match 5-6 nights per week.
 

jjnaaa

Member
AD’s number one job should be hiring coaches and evaluating coaches. You need to be in the game to do that. Managing a couple hundred thousand dollar athletic budget doesn’t require a business degree, and certainly not a law degree. This guy is going to sit in judgement of a coach?? That’s insulting to real coaches. The school has a business manager I would think, and probably a slew of lawyers that they use from time to time. This is just Moeller trying to be on the cutting edge. They couldn’t find the AD they wanted, so they came up with this. Just my guess.
I would be willing to bet schools like Moeller are dealing with budgets that are considerably higher than "a couple hundred thousand dollars."
 

Redandgold

Active member
Probably if possible, there might be help with some of the administrative function of the job. Facilities and how to finance improvements outside of a levy is becoming a huge part of an AD's job.
True, but in most places the President and Principal micromanage the big projects. Few ADs get to make those decisions, even in public schools.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
Knowing what I know about Moe and its athletic culture, there is going to be a lot "putting the touch" on parents and alums for donations. Some of their facilities need some work.
 
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