Let's start a good thread. List something positive today.

eastisbest

Well-known member
I ate four cheap, generic sandwich cookies a little while ago, and I found them to be absolutely delicious.

It can be true. Never tried cookies. I get the generic frosted shredded wheat for money's sake. They had kellog's on sale so I got that and was really disappointed. Not as much frosting and got soggy.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Things I recently learned.

1) Spangler has finally started making Necco Wafers, a sign of good times ahead. No more global warming. No more covid. No more Democratic Presidents (oops, wrong thread).

For those not informed (for whom we feel profound remorse) the company that made Neccos had gone out of biz but local brand Spangler in Bryan took up the challenge, then got hit by covid's effects and weren't able to open production. Now I have discovered, they are in business. As a devout Neccoist I can say, I think they are even better. Each delicious wafer, though made in Mexico has that perfect balance between meltiness and darn, I'm not waiting any longer crunch and sweetness without cloying. The flavors seem to burst more than when made in The Colonies.

Buy Neccos

2) Make sure the ceiling fan is on low setting when using to dry underwear.
 

Happier

Well-known member
Cool story....
" "

Cool story about student writing to WW2 Vet | Boards2Go
Grasberger, who lives in Strongsville, Ohio, was drafted into the military when he was 18 and spent nearly three years in Germany. He received Priest's letter, which was part of a class project, while he was on an Honor Flight home from D.C. in 2009. Ever since, the letter has either been folded neatly in his pocket or tucked away beneath the seat of his wheelchair. Wherever Grasberger goes, the letter goes.

The handwritten note, printed on a sheet of lined paper, imparts a simple message of gratitude: "Thank you for saving us from Hitler. If it wasn't for you, we would never have freedom. You made freedom for us. You sacrificed your own life."

Reading the letter for the first time more than a decade ago, Grasberger was moved to tears. "It really tore my heart up when I saw it," he recalled. "I just couldn't believe a child could write a letter about a war." The message, plus the pencil and crayon drawing of an American flag and Army helmet that accompanied it, resonated deeply.

[O]n July 23, Priest showed up at the retirement community dressed in her military uniform with a dozen red roses in hand. Grasberger was told someone was coming to interview him about the letter, but he had no idea Priest had finally been found - or that she was there to meet him in person.

When she walked in the room, Grasberger immediately exclaimed: "You're not the girl?!"

The emotional surprise was captured on video and featured in a now-viral TikTok. When Grasberger finally grasped that he was with the young woman he had long been searching for, he turned to her, grabbed her hand and said: "I love you so much. I really do."

Moments like this and people like these are exactly the things I love about the spirit of this nation embodied in the tremendous love and respect some carry in their hearts. If only more tried to live from love than from hatred ...
 
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D4fan

Well-known member
Cool story....
" "

Cool story about student writing to WW2 Vet | Boards2Go
Grasberger, who lives in Strongsville, Ohio, was drafted into the military when he was 18 and spent nearly three years in Germany. He received Priest's letter, which was part of a class project, while he was on an Honor Flight home from D.C. in 2009. Ever since, the letter has either been folded neatly in his pocket or tucked away beneath the seat of his wheelchair. Wherever Grasberger goes, the letter goes.

The handwritten note, printed on a sheet of lined paper, imparts a simple message of gratitude: "Thank you for saving us from Hitler. If it wasn't for you, we would never have freedom. You made freedom for us. You sacrificed your own life."

Reading the letter for the first time more than a decade ago, Grasberger was moved to tears. "It really tore my heart up when I saw it," he recalled. "I just couldn't believe a child could write a letter about a war." The message, plus the pencil and crayon drawing of an American flag and Army helmet that accompanied it, resonated deeply.

[O]n July 23, Priest showed up at the retirement community dressed in her military uniform with a dozen red roses in hand. Grasberger was told someone was coming to interview him about the letter, but he had no idea Priest had finally been found - or that she was there to meet him in person.

When she walked in the room, Grasberger immediately exclaimed: "You're not the girl?!"

The emotional surprise was captured on video and featured in a now-viral TikTok. When Grasberger finally grasped that he was with the young woman he had long been searching for, he turned to her, grabbed her hand and said: "I love you so much. I really do."

Moments like this and people like these are exactly the things I love about the spirit of this nation embodied in the tremendous love and respect some carry in their hearts. If only more tried to live from love than from hatred ...
Excellent story. Moved me, I am privileged to have a 99 year old vet as a next door neighbor. He cant hear well, but we have some great conversations. The one lasting thing he has shared with me was how he felt when he was "allowed" to stay on ship during the Normandy invasion and he watched as scores of his friends and comrades were brutally killed trying to get to shore. He was 90 years old before he ever talked about the war with anyone, even his closest family. The guilt of surviving is a very powerful emotion.
 

I enjoy wrestling

Well-known member
I like to day trade. Missed my mark last FRIDAY and sold off, I thought,at a $350 loss for the day. Signed in about 30 minutes ago and see a $1700 profit on stock. I didn't complete the transaction Friday and the stock popped. HLBZ. Lol good day
 
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