Critical Race Theory

bigkat

Well-known member
whiteculture_info_1.png


Good stuff!
so what do you see that is wrong with this way of thinking?
 

Happier

Well-known member
This one:

 

SayMyName

Well-known member
This one:

So CRT is a better option? That's your contention?
 

thisisinsane

Well-known member
This one:
It’s awesome that the people to take exception are middle aged white suburban women. So Happy, I for one, have zero idea how each and every slave felt, do you? When compared with today’s freedoms and living standards, 100% can see how slavery living conditions would certainly not be favored. However, knowing that many Africans were sold to Europeans by other Africans, it may not be such an outlandish thing to say, in context (Hint: a good portion of slaves were already slaves where they came from). Hence, as the book states, they may not have known a difference. Or, in some cases, it was better treatment than what they were previously receiving. Does that mean I think slavery is ok or there could be no better way to word it in the book, no.

So along the lines of this argument, many people get and stay on welfare because it’s easy or because it’s all they know. In 50 years will it be classist to point out that many people born into poverty stayed in that system because that’s all they knew?
 

Purplemojo

Well-known member
This one:
Some slaves fought for the Confederacy, some slaves stayed with their prior masters when freed. One example was the slave of COL Travis, of Alamo fame. Joseph became a free man once he and the COL entered Texas, where slavery was illegal. Despite the fact that he was a free man, he chose to continue to serve COL Travis and given the chance to leave the Alamo, he decided to stay and fight. He was the only male survivor of the battle.

Regardless as to how you feel about it, the historical fact is that some slaves were relatively happy, or at least resigned to their situation. Please, let us not sanitize our history, as the Soviet Union and other totalitarian regimes have done.
 

IVCguy

Well-known member
The problem with CRT is that teaching/promoting/advocating racism in the name of eradicating racism will never work. Simple as that. So, all of you woke morons in education, listen carefully - stop doing that because it makes you the modern day version of George Wallace blocking the door at the U of Alabama. Its just with a twist.
 

gneiss rocks

Well-known member
This one:


Humans generally do not like change. Once the basics are provided humans will typically want to stay with what they know unless otherwise enlightened.

You do not realize it yet but you are exposing the democrat agenda. Most of us here are former democrats...wait until you see it, you will be thinking...how the hell did I miss that?
 

Hammerdrill

Well-known member
This one:

How could you possibly know that all slaves were unhappy? My guess is you have only learned of the truly terrible slave owners. Slavery is still wrong of course, and should never be allowed.
 

bigkat

Well-known member
How could you possibly know that all slaves were unhappy? My guess is you have only learned of the truly terrible slave owners. Slavery is still wrong of course, and should never be allowed.
and they should find out which blacks SOLD their black brothers to slave traders throughout the world and bring them up on charges...
 

Crusaders

Moderator
She wouldn't be a professor in anything if it weren't for CRT and she can't even adequately explain what it is because doing so proves the opposition correct.
 
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hubman

Well-known member
What the video tells me is that most folks on here are clueless to what CRT is, heck the reason I hadn't posted was because I didn't know, but that limitation doesn't seem to limit a lot of folks on here 😂 .
 

Crusaders

Moderator
No, they're not clueless. CRT is exactly as those who oppose it say.

She's a professor of African American studies at Princeton. She's paid a lot of money to teach in a department devoted to CRT. She has a stake in misrepresenting it to the public.
 
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hubman

Well-known member
She wouldn't be a professor in anything if it weren't for CRT and she can't even adequately explain what it is because doing so proves the opposition correct. hubman, you're a moron
Seems like with her education she could be a professor of a lot of things, I wonder how your CV stacks up against hers???



Perry received her Bachelor of Arts Degree in American Studies and Literature from Yale University in 1994. She subsequently earned her Ph.D. in American Civilization from Harvard University and her J.D. from Harvard Law School (from which she graduated at the age of 27). She completed a Future Law Professor's Fellowship and received her LLM from Georgetown University Law Center.[2
 

Crusaders

Moderator
Her only professional focus has been promoting grievance studies (specifically CRT-informed African American-focused social justice) in law schools. This is not uncommon. Many many activists exist in academia, it's a huge part of the problem. Despite her otherwise good credentials, she's done nothing other than inject racism into law schools and write bad cultural takes.

Of course, racists like yourself applaud her.
 

hubman

Well-known member
Her only professional focus has been promoting grievance studies (specifically CRT-informed African American-focused social justice) in law schools. This is not uncommon. Many many activists exist in academia, it's a huge part of the problem. Despite her otherwise good credentials, she's done nothing other than inject racism into law schools and write bad cultural takes.

Of course, racists like yourself applaud her.
You mean inject honest and critical analysis of US history, ok
 

Purplemojo

Well-known member
Thank you Hub for a sincere effort to explain and understand the subject. My life experience and observations argue against CRT however. I am a dark skinned man of Mediterranean decent. I am the son of an immigrant who suffered mightily to bring our family to the US and who achieved the "American Dream" despite the discrimination he faced. I have African -American friends who are lighter in complexion than I. Most of my African-American friends are as conservative as I am and laugh at the wokeness of some of our liberal friends. My wife and I both serve in professions wherein we serve the underserved every day of our working lives and the majority of those we serve are people of color. My grandchildren are truly "color blind" and play with their African-American and Hispanic friends without a second thought, or any awareness of any difference between them. I have dated an African-American woman and two of my three daughters have dated African-American men. All of my children have a diverse group of friends.

The bottom line is that our society has evolved to the point where we still need to address individual racism and any systematic racism that might be found, but, we also have to address those race baiters who continue to perpetrate the fraud that systematic racism is wide spread and that we have made little improvement in race relations.

All that said, I embrace the teachings of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King and reject any type of racial discrimination, whether the targeted victims are Black, White, Asian or Hispanic. You can reject his teachings and embrace this renewed racism as set out in CRT, but I choose not to spit in the face of those brave men and women, Black and White, who fought for equality in the past. Rev. Dr. King would be appalled by the racism contained in efforts to seek "equity" and the whole CRT effort.
 
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bigkat

Well-known member
Seems like with her education she could be a professor of a lot of things, I wonder how your CV stacks up against hers???



Perry received her Bachelor of Arts Degree in American Studies and Literature from Yale University in 1994. She subsequently earned her Ph.D. in American Civilization from Harvard University and her J.D. from Harvard Law School (from which she graduated at the age of 27). She completed a Future Law Professor's Fellowship and received her LLM from Georgetown University Law Center.[2
doesn't mean she has any common sense..... alot of very smart people are actually kind of dumb.... wonder if she owns a left handed screw driver?
 

bigkat

Well-known member
This one:

SOME.... NOT ALL......... key words
 

hubman

Well-known member
Thank you Hub for a sincere effort to explain and understand the subject. My life experience and observations argue against CRT however. I am a dark skinned man of Mediterranean decent. I am the son of an immigrant who suffered mightily to bring our family to the US and who achieved the "American Dream" despite the discrimination he faced. I have African -American friends who are lighter in complexion than I. Most of my African-American friends are as conservative as I am and laugh at the wokeness of some of our liberal friends. My wife and I both serve in professions wherein we serve the underserved every day of our working lives and the majority of those we serve are people of color. My grandchildren are truly "color blind" and play with their African-American and Hispanic friends without a second thought, or any awareness of any difference between them. I have dated an African-American woman and two of my three daughters have dated African-American men. All of my children have a diverse group of friends.

The bottom line is that our society has evolved to the point where we still need to address individual racism and any systematic racism that might be found, but, we also have to address those race baiters who continue to perpetrate the fraud that systematic racism is wide spread and that we have made little improvement in race relations.

All that said, I embrace the teachings of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King and reject any type of racial discrimination, whether the targeted victims are Black, White, Asian or Hispanic. You can reject his teachings and embrace this renewed racism as set out in CRT, but I choose not to spit in the face of those brave men and women, Black and White, who fought for equality in the past. Rev. Dr. King would be appalled by the racism contained in efforts to seek "equity" and the whole CRT effort.
Like you have stated before we agree on many things. Also like you years ago I thought most racism in this country was anecdotal and singular in nature. The more I read and observe as I get older things lead me away from that thought. When I read how Blacks when taking all other things into consideration are sentenced 15 to 20 percent longer when convicted of a crime, or how Blacks and Whites smoke Weed at the same rate, but Blacks are 3 times as likely to get arrested, or when applying to a job resumes with White sounding names are 50% more likely to get a call back. Not to mention financial losses to people of color through generations thanks to Redlining. All of these studies are not anecdotal, there shall we say "systemic". As I read more about CRT and not from sources such as the Federalist or Fox news. It seems CRT just tries to look at reasons of disparate outcomes, even when laws are supposed to be color blind. Similar to post I made on another thread, just because a law doesn't state someone's race in it, doesn't make it race neutral. The big thing on the "Right" now is how horrible "cancel culture" is, but if you think about it America has "criminalized culture" of people of color for years. Just look at our criminal justice systems reaction to Alcohol, marijuana, and opioids. The one most commonly associated or used by Whites they legalized or offered treatment, even when we used the same drugs in different forms, sentencing for crack was 10 to 1 compared to powder cocaine, and the usage differences between Blacks and Whites were about the same . At least if they cancel your culture you don't end up in jail. I think about the westerns I've watched over the years and how it was the culture in many native American Tribes to steal another mans horse, what did European settlers do, they made stealing horses a hanging offence.


The excerpt below is the President's right hand man admitting to "Criminalizing Culture"

“You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin. And then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities,” Ehrlichman said. “We could arrest their leaders. raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”


The New Right-Wing Bogeyman​


Crenshaw and her classmates asked 12 scholars of color to come to campus and lead discussions about Bell’s book Race, Racism, and American Law. With that, critical race theory began in earnest. The approach “is often disruptive because its commitment to anti-racism goes well beyond civil rights, integration, affirmative action, and other liberal measures,” Bell explained in 1995. The theory’s proponents argue that the nation’s sordid history of slavery, segregation, and discrimination is embedded in our laws, and continues to play a central role in preventing Black Americans and other marginalized groups from living lives untouched by racism.


For some, the theory was a revelatory way to understand inequality. Take housing, for example. Researchers have now accumulated ample evidence that racial covenants in property deeds and redlining by the Federal Housing Authority—banned more than 60 years ago—remain a major contributor to the gulf in homeownership, and thus wealth, between Black and white people.
 

Hammerdrill

Well-known member
Like you have stated before we agree on many things. Also like you years ago I thought most racism in this country was anecdotal and singular in nature. The more I read and observe as I get older things lead me away from that thought. When I read how Blacks when taking all other things into consideration are sentenced 15 to 20 percent longer when convicted of a crime, or how Blacks and Whites smoke Weed at the same rate, but Blacks are 3 times as likely to get arrested, or when applying to a job resumes with White sounding names are 50% more likely to get a call back. Not to mention financial losses to people of color through generations thanks to Redlining. All of these studies are not anecdotal, there shall we say "systemic". As I read more about CRT and not from sources such as the Federalist or Fox news. It seems CRT just tries to look at reasons of disparate outcomes, even when laws are supposed to be color blind. Similar to post I made on another thread, just because a law doesn't state someone's race in it, doesn't make it race neutral. The big thing on the "Right" now is how horrible "cancel culture" is, but if you think about it America has "criminalized culture" of people of color for years. Just look at our criminal justice systems reaction to Alcohol, marijuana, and opioids. The one most commonly associated or used by Whites they legalized or offered treatment, even when we used the same drugs in different forms, sentencing for crack was 10 to 1 compared to powder cocaine, and the usage differences between Blacks and Whites were about the same . At least if they cancel your culture you don't end up in jail. I think about the westerns I've watched over the years and how it was the culture in many native American Tribes to steal another mans horse, what did European settlers do, they made stealing horses a hanging offence.


The excerpt below is the President's right hand man admitting to "Criminalizing Culture"

“You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin. And then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities,” Ehrlichman said. “We could arrest their leaders. raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”


The New Right-Wing Bogeyman​


Crenshaw and her classmates asked 12 scholars of color to come to campus and lead discussions about Bell’s book Race, Racism, and American Law. With that, critical race theory began in earnest. The approach “is often disruptive because its commitment to anti-racism goes well beyond civil rights, integration, affirmative action, and other liberal measures,” Bell explained in 1995. The theory’s proponents argue that the nation’s sordid history of slavery, segregation, and discrimination is embedded in our laws, and continues to play a central role in preventing Black Americans and other marginalized groups from living lives untouched by racism.


For some, the theory was a revelatory way to understand inequality. Take housing, for example. Researchers have now accumulated ample evidence that racial covenants in property deeds and redlining by the Federal Housing Authority—banned more than 60 years ago—remain a major contributor to the gulf in homeownership, and thus wealth, between Black and white people.
98% of what is slowing black progress is self inflicted. To blame whites is simply wrong, and completely unproductive if your goal is to help blacks.
 
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