Ask The Ref?

Yes, bad choice, chop is at los, up and down? and cut is not?
Chop Block under NCAA Rules is any high/low or low/high combination by two opponents anywhere on the field (regardless of any delay as well).

A Block Below the waist, otherwise known as a "cut block", is legal under NCAA Rules, provided it meets the criteria set forth in the Rule Book..

.....which includes a subsection for Team A and Team B (3 exceptions noted for Team A and Team B), as well as three other subsections that cover downs that involve a free or scrimmage kick, downs that have a change of possession, or clipping....

For NFHS Rules, It's is illegal for any player to block below the waist unless both players are on the line of scrimmage at the snap and within the free blocking zone. In addition the block must be immediate.

:oops:
 
Chop Block under NCAA Rules is any high/low or low/high combination by two opponents anywhere on the field (regardless of any delay as well).

A Block Below the waist, otherwise known as a "cut block", is legal under NCAA Rules, provided it meets the criteria set forth in the Rule Book..

.....which includes a subsection for Team A and Team B (3 exceptions noted for Team A and Team B), as well as three other subsections that cover downs that involve a free or scrimmage kick, downs that have a change of possession, or clipping....

For NFHS Rules, It's is illegal for any player to block below the waist unless both players are on the line of scrimmage at the snap and within the free blocking zone. In addition the block must be immediate.

:oops:
More familiar with the HS rule on this, Thanks!!
 
More familiar with the HS rule on this, Thanks!!
Yeah, the FED rule is exponentially easier.....

Here's the NCAA rule regarding Blocking Below the Waist....

Blocking Below the Waist
ARTICLE 6.

a.) Team A prior to a change of team possession:
Linemen with initial position completely inside the tackle box may legally block below the waist inside the tackle box until the ball leaves the tackle box. All other Team A players are allowed to block below the waist only if the force of the initial contact is directed from the front. “Directed from the front” is defined as within the clock face region between “10 o’clock and 2 o’clock” forward of the area of concentration of the player being blocked.
Exceptions:
1. Team A players may not block below the waist when the block occurs five yards or more beyond the neutral zone.
2. Players outside the tackle box at the snap, or any time after the snap, or in motion at the snap may not block below the waist toward the original position of the ball at the snap.
3. Once the ball has left the tackle box, a player may not block below the waist toward their own end line.

b.) Team B prior to a change of team possession:
1. Other than in paragraphs 2 and 3 (below), players of Team B may block below the waist only within the area defined by lines parallel to the goal line five yards beyond and behind the neutral zone extended to the sidelines. To be legal, this block must be directed from the front. Blocking below the waist by players of Team B outside this zone is illegal except against the ball carrier. (A.R. 9-1-6-VI, IX)
2. Players of Team B may not block below the waist against an opponent who is in position to receive a backward pass.
3. Players of Team B may not block below the waist against an eligible Team A pass receiver beyond the neutral zone unless attempting to get to the ball or ball carrier. This prohibition ends when a legal forward pass is no longer possible by rule.

c.) Kicks. During a down in which there is a free kick or scrimmage kick, blocking below the waist by any player is illegal except against a ball carrier.
d.) After change of team possession. After any change of team possession, blocking below the waist by any player is illegal except against a ball carrier.
e.) Clipping. No player may violate Rule 9-1-5 (Clipping).
 
A's mouthguard is dangling from his facemask (i.e., not in his mouth).
If B makes any contact with A's mouthguard is this a PF Facemask?
 
A's mouthguard is dangling from his facemask (i.e., not in his mouth).
If B makes any contact with A's mouthguard is this a PF Facemask?
No, just as it is not illegal to simply make contact with the facemask.

Grasping the attached mouth/tooth guard is subject to the same rule as the facemask. If incidental, the foul carries a 5yd penalty. If not incidental, the foul carries a 15yd penalty.
 
No, just as it is not illegal to simply make contact with the facemask.

Grasping the attached mouth/tooth guard is subject to the same rule as the facemask. If incidental, the foul carries a 5yd penalty. If not incidental, the foul carries a 15yd penalty.
Along those lines. Is there any penalty or warning for exposed equipment? Or maybe a helmet strap not snapped? Is it more or less "Son you need to check..."?
 
Along those lines. Is there any penalty or warning for exposed equipment? Or maybe a helmet strap not snapped? Is it more or less "Son you need to check..."?
We give them an opportunity to correct the matter. If they cannot in a timely fashion, we send them to the sidelines to get it corrected.
 
Here is the scenario I witnessed. What is the correct call?
After a time out on the field by Team B on defense.
In the first half of a football game, Team A on offense is penalized for illegal motion, 5-yard penalty enforced, clock remains stopped, ball blown ready for play, clock starts on the snap.
Second half exact same scenario. After Team B uses a time out on defense, Team A on offense is penalized for illegal motion, 5 yard penalty enforced, the head ref winds the clock after penalty is marched off. Team B on defense called the time out to stop the clock to have time to try for a stop to get the ball back. Clock now running. Should the clock been signaled to start after the penalty?
 
Here is the scenario I witnessed. What is the correct call?
After a time out on the field by Team B on defense.
In the first half of a football game, Team A on offense is penalized for illegal motion, 5-yard penalty enforced, clock remains stopped, ball blown ready for play, clock starts on the snap.
Second half exact same scenario. After Team B uses a time out on defense, Team A on offense is penalized for illegal motion, 5 yard penalty enforced, the head ref winds the clock after penalty is marched off. Team B on defense called the time out to stop the clock to have time to try for a stop to get the ball back. Clock now running. Should the clock been signaled to start after the penalty?
Need more information to make an accurate assessment....

First, Illegal Motion is a live ball foul. Therefore, the status of the clock when the play ended will determine whether or not the Referee will wind the clock on the ready on the ready for play. If the clock was running at the end of the play (tackled inbounds), then you wind it on the ready. (see exception situation noted below) If the clock was stopped at the end of the play (incomplete pass or runner out of bounds), then you wind the clock on the snap.

Now, there is an exception to this procedure ----> In situations where a penalty is accepted with less than 2 minutes remaining in either half, the offended team has the option to have the clock start on the snap.
 
Need more information to make an accurate assessment....

First, Illegal Motion is a live ball foul. Therefore, the status of the clock when the play ended will determine whether or not the Referee will wind the clock on the ready on the ready for play. If the clock was running at the end of the play (tackled inbounds), then you wind it on the ready. (see exception situation noted below) If the clock was stopped at the end of the play (incomplete pass or runner out of bounds), then you wind the clock on the snap.

Now, there is an exception to this procedure ----> In situations where a penalty is accepted with less than 2 minutes remaining in either half, the offended team has the option to have the clock start on the snap.
In both circumstances of the game, the defense was calling time out to get the ball back. Coming out of the time out, the offense moved before the snap. Flag was thrown, 5-yard penalty was assessed. The first half penalty, the clock started at the snap of the ball. in the second half, the Ref started the clock on the ready to play whistle, before the snap of the ball. There was a mistake made there. The clock, I feel, should not have started until the snap of the ball.
Which is the correct call?
 
In both circumstances of the game, the defense was calling time out to get the ball back. Coming out of the time out, the offense moved before the snap. Flag was thrown, 5-yard penalty was assessed. The first half penalty, the clock started at the snap of the ball. in the second half, the Ref started the clock on the ready to play whistle, before the snap of the ball. There was a mistake made there. The clock, I feel, should not have started until the snap of the ball.
Which is the correct call?
I need to know what the foul was for each situation....

Did the officials kill the play once the flag was thrown or after the result of the play?
 
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I need to know what the foul was for each situation....

Did the officials kill the play once the flag was thrown or after the result of the play?
False start. Before the play was in action. In the first half the offensive tackle moved. In the second half the receiver crossed the LOS and was 3 yards up the field before the snap. No play was run in either case.
 
False start. Before the play was in action. In the first half the offensive tackle moved. In the second half the receiver crossed the LOS and was 3 yards up the field before the snap. No play was run in either case.
Since both were dead ball fouls after a charged time out, the clock should have started on the snap for both plays.
 
How do you determine holding from offensive linemen?
A pretty good breakdown of what we look for...

 
A pretty good breakdown of what we look for...

Thank you for this.
 
I’ve always been taught “material restriction at the point of contact”. If it doesn’t impact the play count to two and then decide.
 
I’ve always been taught “material restriction at the point of contact”. If it doesn’t impact the play count to two and then decide.
That's a good start, however, when a play goes between the left tackle and guard and the tight end reaches out and grabs the outside linebacker attempting to crash from the back side, you have to get that as well, even thought it's not at the POA
 
Based on national current events,... a friend asked me yesterday if Ohio has stiffer penalties for physical attacks on sports officials.

I should know, but I don't.
 
Based on national current events,... a friend asked me yesterday if Ohio has stiffer penalties for physical attacks on sports officials.

I should know, but I don't.
there is an attempt going through the state legislature to pass a carved out law for assault of sports officials to have a certain degree of penalty. However it has not passed the GA and/or Senate yet.
 
The friend I mentioned works in municipal government and is setting up a meeting with a state legislature to discuss the issue.

Any specifics on what other states are doing might be beneficial.
 
I have a son in 8th grade. I’m worried they’ll be back to four man crews for varsity. The numbers in my old association (NKY) are so low they are asking me to come back. I feel somewhat confident they were sad to see me leave, but it’s the same across all sports in the nation. I haven’t said a word to a sports official since 2003 that was negative.
 
Based on national current events,... a friend asked me yesterday if Ohio has stiffer penalties for physical attacks on sports officials.

I should know, but I don't.
Ohio is one of 17 states that has limited liability legislation.

Here's a resource that will shed some light on other states through 2021.....

 
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