7on7 What are your thoughts? Has it been helpful for your program .

thavoice

Well-known member
From a former QB (albeit a bad one) I believe they are very beneficial especially in smaller schools who cannot two platoon.
Going up against a first team defense in 7 on 7 in a practice learning session is huge.

You don't need to be stupid and travel all-over the country like Kenton but yeah, 7/7 are good


They aren't the end all, be all but a valuable tool to use.

Overlooked portion is defensively for running teams. The y get awful looks in practice
 

Starkbuck

Active member
I think they have their merits when conducted properly and used as an extension of practice itself. Going to competitions and other camps lead to poor habits and tendencies rather than using it as a means to develop proper habits and techniques.
 

DonCalipari

Active member
I think they have their merits when conducted properly and used as an extension of practice itself. Going to competitions and other camps lead to poor habits and tendencies rather than using it as a means to develop proper habits and techniques.
Yes at these camps I see bad habits & bad techniques especially from the defensive backs.
 

Pickeringtonsports

Active member
Our high school team doesn’t do 7on7. Definitely not a fan for QBs as it’s too easy to develop bad habits. Plus, the season could be 15-16 games plus camps, off season workouts, conditioning, basketball, baseball, etc… It can become too much.
 

Harrycrane

Well-known member
Our high school team doesn’t do 7on7. Definitely not a fan for QBs as it’s too easy to develop bad habits. Plus, the season could be 15-16 games plus camps, off season workouts, conditioning, basketball, baseball, etc… It can become too much.
15 to 16 games every year for the Pick C Sports factory may be. Not many other schools though lol . It can be helpful I suppose in some ways but , how much ? Not sure . Reps throwing and catching , running routes, Reps of guys defending one on one . Hard to quantify the bad habits that may be picked up by the QB or defenders though. You start practice after that , scrimmages and then game action. Not sure you can spot bad '7 on 7 'Habits". Same theory as guy who don't want to enter home run hitting contests? Bad habits? Swing issues after ? { Then again everyone upper cuts { swing planes} and tries to get the ball up in the air EVERY TIME now } I think it's fun for some kids and it helps develop some chemistry . I realize fun is not usually a reason given as to why you do something athletically these days lol
 

Just.here

Well-known member
We keep talking about ‘bad habits’ but isn’t the point of these so you can be coached out of them?

I think it’s great and it gives you a chance to see other team’s schemes and test your ability to adapt on the fly and coach the kids what to do against an offense/defense different than your own.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
Our high school team doesn’t do 7on7. Definitely not a fan for QBs as it’s too easy to develop bad habits. Plus, the season could be 15-16 games plus camps, off season workouts, conditioning, basketball, baseball, etc… It can become too much.
At syndicates like pickerington you have D1 talent at every spot and can do the same in practice,for us small Podunk cowtowns who scrape by with 5 foot nothin kids and barely enough to go 11 on 11 they are important to go against other first team defenses.

We may have to take tractors to get to some of these 7 on 7s and most of the kids haven't seen a building with more than two stories by golly gee whillikers we will compete like heck.

I don't buy the getting bad habits argument fr defense. Each coach is focused on that one side of the ball in a 7/7 whereas at a practice many are split watching the offense or defense.

All things being equal, you are better off doing them than not.
 

fbrox

Active member
It has value. It’s good for defenses to line up according to formations and make adjustments to motion. It also allows auto check installs. Offensively it good for qb’s to learn pre snap coverage recognition. Receivers also can learn routes and adjustments according to coverages.
 

Maple_City_Fan

Well-known member
I don't care for schools making big deals about winning 7 on 7 tournaments. Usually those that do are ones that it's their only significant accomplishment that season.

Other than that, I'm indifferent.
 

scbuckeye99

Well-known member
And keeps the kids interested. It’s ok if practice is fun sometimes.
While not a fan of them, I do think they keep the kids competitive during the summer and like you said are meant to be fun. I've witnessed first hand too many 7 on 7 champions go 5-5 when it really mattered. 5 years ago a school in our conference blew up the 7 on 7 circuit one summer (state and regional 7 on 7 tournaments) only to get knocked out in the first round of the playoffs to a Wing T offense.

In high school we only went to one 7 on 7 (my junior year) and as a center it was boring :)
 

Starkbuck

Active member
We keep talking about ‘bad habits’ but isn’t the point of these so you can be coached out of them?

I think it’s great and it gives you a chance to see other team’s schemes and test your ability to adapt on the fly and coach the kids what to do against an offense/defense different than your own.
Yes, if used as an extension of practice and proper instruction is taking place, rather than focusing on the competition aspect. However, these 7 on 7 tournaments are becoming like AAU games where it is an opportunity to take risks and show off athleticism, rather than play within a scheme and learn fundamentals.

I agree though that this can be an incredibly effective teaching tool for young QBs and DBs to teach reaction skills at a higher level than practice, but those 7 on 7 scrimmages are much more coach controlled and situational. The scrimmages where coaches are able to stop play, and then teach are far more valuable than any type of tournament or what not.
 

cincifbfan

Well-known member
It has value. It’s good for defenses to line up according to formations and make adjustments to motion. It also allows auto check installs. Offensively it good for qb’s to learn pre snap coverage recognition. Receivers also can learn routes and adjustments according to coverages.
I agree 100% with this.

My favorite is when schools do something completely different on defense just to have extra defenders in the 7 on 7. I have seen TRUE 5-2 teams (even keep the 50 front against spread teams) all of a sudden bring 8 guys out there for 7 on 7. How does that help you at all?
 

BirdDog10

Well-known member
Good because it gives kids a chance to compete in the offseason, and I think it's more beneficial for defenses than it is for offenses. I've seen teams though that dominated 7 on 7's and got smacked all year once real football started, and teams that couldn't win a single 7 on 7 against anyone then manhandled the majority of their schedule. I think good teams realize it's just more of an interesting practice than anything else
 

thavoice

Well-known member
7on7 is one of the most overblown things in high school. It has merit in the fact of seeing which kids want to compete but that's it. The defense knows it's a pass, the offense knows they can't be hit. It really doesn't mean anything when it comes to the outcome of the season.
Overblown?
To a point, but to say it doesnt mean anything then you must also believe practice doesnt mean anything.

It is just another way to practice. That is it. Against another team's first team isntead of backups for those in small schools where kids go both ways.

To dismiss them is wrong, just as making too big of deal of them is wrong as well.
 

wickb2233

Active member
Overblown?
To a point, but to say it doesnt mean anything then you must also believe practice doesnt mean anything.

It is just another way to practice. That is it. Against another team's first team isntead of backups for those in small schools where kids go both ways.

To dismiss them is wrong, just as making too big of deal of them is wrong as well.
I said it doesn't mean anything in terms of the outcome of the season. Because It doesn't.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
I said it doesn't mean anything in terms of the outcome of the season. Because It doesn't.
It's practice.

No one block of instruction has a direct outcome on the season.

Practice as a whole of course does have a direct outcome though......
 

thavoice

Well-known member
Like anything else.
You get out of something what you put into it.
no different than in practice, it is on the coaches to teach the proper techniques and not let it happen.
if some teams LBs always bail to help them get into their areas quicker it may help that 7/7 result but hurt themselves in the season.
7on7 is very useful when used right. run your offense and focus on your QB making his reads.

from a defense standpoint, it’s helpful except when you tell your linebackers to bail.
 

ghsknightsfan

Well-known member
Like anything else.
You get out of something what you put into it.
no different than in practice, it is on the coaches to teach the proper techniques and not let it happen.
if some teams LBs always bail to help them get into their areas quicker it may help that 7/7 result but hurt themselves in the season.
agreed. 7on7 can either create very good tendencies or very bad ones. it’s up to coaching
 

ShootNation

Active member
Are they beneficial? Sure. Are they the thing you should build your program's off season around? Absolutely not. Too many programs do things in 7 on 7 that they would never do in a real game (on both sides of the ball) to rely on it. Ideally you install a concept, 7 on 7 with it, review film, and move on. Going to tons of them starts to get counterproductive really quickly and after a while they start to develop bad habits in your players and are significantly more physically taxing than they are given credit for
 

2020Dad

Active member
7 vs 7s are good for identifying the T-Shirt All American's for the most part. We have all seen QBs at camps that look great in the 7 vs 7 scrimmages but couldn't hit a bull in the with a bass fiddle if you grab a helmet and pair of shoulder pads and slam them together. I do think 7 vs 7 has some value especially for your pass defense, but most people hype the value and put way too much focus on them. I see wing T teams at 7 vs 7s that will not throw the ball all season as much as they threw it in one 7 vs 7 scrimmage. 7 vs 7 does nothing for your running game or run defense so if you play in a conference that doesn't really throw the ball and you have a team that doesn't really throw the ball I am not sure how much you really get out of it. Just my two cents
 
In the State of Florida, 7 on 7 is a big deal. They actually have a spring season for this; and playoffs which culminates in a State Championship. With the caliber of ball they play down there, and the amount of skilled athletes that they pump out every year, I think 7 on 7 is very beneficial.
 

thavoice

Well-known member
7 vs 7s are good for identifying the T-Shirt All American's for the most part. We have all seen QBs at camps that look great in the 7 vs 7 scrimmages but couldn't hit a bull in the with a bass fiddle if you grab a helmet and pair of shoulder pads and slam them together. I do think 7 vs 7 has some value especially for your pass defense, but most people hype the value and put way too much focus on them. I see wing T teams at 7 vs 7s that will not throw the ball all season as much as they threw it in one 7 vs 7 scrimmage. 7 vs 7 does nothing for your running game or run defense so if you play in a conference that doesn't really throw the ball and you have a team that doesn't really throw the ball I am not sure how much you really get out of it. Just my two cents
Wing T squads see more benefits on the defensivew side for 7/7.

They do not get good looks in practice.
 
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