7 on 7 in Ohio

John Lee Pettimore

Well-known member
it does nothing for high school football TEAMS.
So the coaches who DO involve their teams in these events do so to what....just get the kids out of the house for a few hours? Babysit?

Coach: "football season doesn't keep me away from my family enough....despite it doing nothing for my team....I think I'll take the kids and compete in a 7 on 7....ya know....just to get out of the house."
 

Spark1357

Member
While it means nothing in late October, 7 on 7’s are good for overall conditioning between June-August 1. You can get your skill players in shape and build passing game chemistry. You can also have your olinemen doing some side work. Some schools do a friendly game of tug of war to test team strength. It is better than just waiting until Aug 1
 

John Lee Pettimore

Well-known member
While it means nothing in late October, 7 on 7’s are good for overall conditioning between June-August 1. You can get your skill players in shape and build passing game chemistry. You can also have your olinemen doing some side work. Some schools do a friendly game of tug of war to test team strength. It is better than just waiting until Aug 1
It can also help with route running, timing, mechanics, footwork....etc....is it the end all be all to developing a winning team? No, but to say it does "nothing" is silly.
 

SportsFan79

Active member
Can someone give me some clarification on why 7 on 7 is not bigger in Ohio?
There is a little paragraph in the OHSAA that says basically extra football isn’t allowed outside team events. It’s sham and archaic rule that needs eliminated.
Every other sport in the state is allowed to participate in some sort of “AAU” type stuff except football.
You got coaching interviews from a lot of big time college football coaches over the past couple of years talking about how it can help skill players develop even more.

Lastly,
These clowns here smashing on it most definitely root for kids on their favorite college teams who benefited in other states from high level 7v7. Ohio State is filled with skill kids who participated in it, yet the OHSAA still thinks it’s 1975.
It’s a joke
 
7 v 7 is what you make of it. As a coach, I am focusing on QB steps, progression, receiver routes, field spacing. But this should also be done in practice. I don't care for 7's, but we still do them. It is something different for the players. If you are a small numbers team where everyone is a two-way player, it can be beneficial.
 

CedarBuck92

Well-known member
Because it's not real football and in Ohio we like real football. It's stupid, it reeks of AAU and it does nothing for high school football TEAMS.
So much of this depends on what offense you are running and even what type of offenses you expect to face. If you are a team that averages 1 pass a decade then they probably aren't for you. But if you like to air it out, getting to go against someone other than your own guys can help at least some. As JLP said above, its not the end all be all of a winning team but it can help.
 

BirdDog10

Well-known member
There is a little paragraph in the OHSAA that says basically extra football isn’t allowed outside team events. It’s sham and archaic rule that needs eliminated.
Every other sport in the state is allowed to participate in some sort of “AAU” type stuff except football.
No, it really doesn't need to be eliminated. Eliminating AAU or equivalents in other sports would do much, much more for kids, coaches, and families than adding AAU "7 on 7" would for anyone
 

lightspeed84

Active member
No, it really doesn't need to be eliminated. Eliminating AAU or equivalents in other sports would do much, much more for kids, coaches, and families than adding AAU "7 on 7" would for anyone
Preach brother, absolutely ridiculous, youth sports participation is declining "I know, lets make children commit their entire life and soul to one sport so they are burnt out by 14 years old" that will help the sport and make well rounded kids
 

BigK72

Active member
Like others have said, they can be beneficial for a variety of reasons. The thing that irritates me is teams/coaches NOT treating it like real football.

The classic example is running some kind of vertical stem from a running back in the backfield, but they just go from a dead sprint/clean release. That's not real football. Or the competitions that prohibit press-coverage.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Like others have said, they can be beneficial for a variety of reasons. The thing that irritates me is teams/coaches NOT treating it like real football.

The classic example is running some kind of vertical stem from a running back in the backfield, but they just go from a dead sprint/clean release. That's not real football. Or the competitions that prohibit press-coverage.
First, passing scrimmages aren't real football.

Second, it was kind of innovative when we started running our halfback on a vertical route, in 1988.
 

BigK72

Active member
First, passing scrimmages aren't real football.

Second, it was kind of innovative when we started running our halfback on a vertical route, in 1988.
You completely missed the point. It's physically impossible for a rb to run a vert from sidecar in shotgun in a real game. In an actual game, there are linemen at the LOS. My point is that you see teams run concepts that are virtually impossible to run in a real game, but they cheat the 7on7 and run them anyway. Obviously a 7-on-7 isn't real football, but running concepts/plays specifically for them that WON'T translate to a full game is pointless.
 
It doesn't translate to the point that nearly every D1 college camp in Ohio is running at least one day of 7v7's this summer as a part of their camps. I get that most Ohio high school fans don't care about what they believe doesn't translate to the success of their teams. For the kids who want to play football at the college level (D1-D3), however, there are things that can be gleaned from it both in skill development and talent evaluation. Kids in other states are competing in 7v7's January-May. Getting valuable reps and skill work and D1 coaches can attend Mid- April through the end of May and see the kids compete. In Ohio they'll watch the kids lift weights or practice. It's putting Ohio at a serious disadvantage when it comes to recruiting both in exposure and in development. If you don't believe me, believe Ryan Day. Don't just take my word for it. I had a discussion with OSU running backs coach Tony Alford a few weeks back and he said Ryan Day is doing everything within his power to push for Ohio to allow Spring ball and 7V7. I firmly believe the reason Spring Ball and 7V7 haven't come to Ohio is that the majority of HS coaches have fought it tooth and nail. They don't want to lose their control over their players and their players will pay the price for this type of thinking. It also goes along with the coaches who don't help their kids get recruited. I know a coach of a prominent school in Ohio who wouldn't even follow one of his players on twitter to try and help him get recruited. That's the old guard. It's time for change.
 

cincyhoops

Well-known member
There is a little paragraph in the OHSAA that says basically extra football isn’t allowed outside team events. It’s sham and archaic rule that needs eliminated.
Every other sport in the state is allowed to participate in some sort of “AAU” type stuff except football.
You got coaching interviews from a lot of big time college football coaches over the past couple of years talking about how it can help skill players develop even more.

Lastly,
These clowns here smashing on it most definitely root for kids on their favorite college teams who benefited in other states from high level 7v7. Ohio State is filled with skill kids who participated in it, yet the OHSAA still thinks it’s 1975.
It’s a joke
Rules for football are the same as any other sport. In basketball you can only have 2 kids per AAU team in March/April/May. So high school teams aren't playing AAU basketball together. I would assume kids from various high schools could get together and play 7 on 7 games? Who is stopping them from doing that? It can't be organized by the high school, but neither can an AAU basketball team.

In June/July high school basketball teams can play together for 10 days. But high school football teams can do the same with 7 on 7's I believe, if they use their 10 coaching days that way.

Not sure what the difference between football and any other sport is?
 

SportsFan79

Active member
I’ll simply watch Saturdays and listen to coaches like Nick Saban and others who believe in 7v7s and continue to get there skill players from kids who participate in it from other states.

You guys can stay in the 80s but still root for kids who have benefitted from 7v7s on your favorite college teams. 🤣😂🤣
 

SportsFan79

Active member
Rules for football are the same as any other sport. In basketball you can only have 2 kids per AAU team in March/April/May. So high school teams aren't playing AAU basketball together. I would assume kids from various high schools could get together and play 7 on 7 games? Who is stopping them from doing that? It can't be organized by the high school, but neither can an AAU basketball team.

In June/July high school basketball teams can play together for 10 days. But high school football teams can do the same with 7 on 7's I believe, if they use their 10 coaching days that way.

Not sure what the difference between football and any other sport is?

Actually they aren’t the same as I’ve said. Pages 5 and 6 detail it.
 

reganaustinjames

Active member
It's one article, but it looks like all cons to me.

Also, OSU doesn't have anywhere close to the power that it thinks it does over Ohio high school football (maybe scheduling playoff game times, but that's it); Ohio won't adopt spring ball/7-on-7 just because Ryan Day wants it.
 
It's one article, but it looks like all cons to me.

Also, OSU doesn't have anywhere close to the power that it thinks it does over Ohio high school football (maybe scheduling playoff game times, but that's it); Ohio won't adopt spring ball/7-on-7 just because Ryan Day wants it.
Care to explain the cons? The recruiting stuff has always and will always go on whether Ohio adopts 7V7 or not. This is about treating football fairly in allowing them to compete just like all other sports are allowed to play on club or travel based teams.
And for the record most college coaches think it's ridiculous, not just Ryan Day.
 

reganaustinjames

Active member
Care to explain the cons? The recruiting stuff has always and will always go on whether Ohio adopts 7V7 or not. This is about treating football fairly in allowing them to compete just like all other sports are allowed to play on club or travel based teams.
And for the record most college coaches think it's ridiculous, not just Ryan Day.
Did you not read the article? This allows for potential recruiting malarkey, if not outright violations. And yes, multiple transfers in high school are always a red flag, regardless of whether or not it's athletically motivated. It's also pretty clear college coaches don't even take 7 on 7 seriously to begin with, so why bother with it?

Football, because of its nature and the sheer numbers required, can't be treated the same as other sports. While high school football coaches being control freaks is no secret, the real reasons they're so opposed to AAU-like 7 on 7 are 1) injury risk and 2) they've seen what's happened when kids are shoe-horned into competing one sport year-round at too young of an age. They burn out. And football's got enough problems with retaining kids as it is.
 
Did you not read the article? This allows for potential recruiting malarkey, if not outright violations. And yes, multiple transfers in high school are always a red flag, regardless of whether or not it's athletically motivated. It's also pretty clear college coaches don't even take 7 on 7 seriously to begin with, so why bother with it?

Football, because of its nature and the sheer numbers required, can't be treated the same as other sports. While high school football coaches being control freaks is no secret, the real reasons they're so opposed to AAU-like 7 on 7 are 1) injury risk and 2) they've seen what's happened when kids are shoe-horned into competing one sport year-round at too young of an age. They burn out. And football's got enough problems with retaining kids as it is.
As I said before recruiting has always and will always go on. The same kids that will play 7V7 are the same kids that run into each other at college camps all summer. If they want to leave for perceived greener pastures, it's not going to take 7V7 to facilitate that. If soccer players are allowed to play club soccer, if basketball players are allowed to play AAU, if softball players are allowed to play travel ball, you have to allow high school football players to play their equivalent which is 7V7. When it comes to recruiting not having 7V7 is putting Ohio High School football players at a clear disadvantage to other states that allow it. I get it though, a lot of fans and old coaches don't care about the kids as individuals, it's all about their program.
 

SportsFan79

Active member
Did you not read the article? This allows for potential recruiting malarkey, if not outright violations. And yes, multiple transfers in high school are always a red flag, regardless of whether or not it's athletically motivated. It's also pretty clear college coaches don't even take 7 on 7 seriously to begin with, so why bother with it?

Football, because of its nature and the sheer numbers required, can't be treated the same as other sports. While high school football coaches being control freaks is no secret, the real reasons they're so opposed to AAU-like 7 on 7 are 1) injury risk and 2) they've seen what's happened when kids are shoe-horned into competing one sport year-round at too young of an age. They burn out. And football's got enough problems with retaining kids as it is.
Nick Saban runs his own 7v7 tournaments on campus. 😂🤣😂

1980 mentality “college coaches don’t take 7v7 seriously”
 

SportsFan79

Active member
Akron, Bowling Green, Toledo, and Ohio State are all conducting 7V7 camps this summer.
Agree but as you say “summer”. Football in Ohio has a 10month no play rule. Opening it up in June-July only is laughable.

It’s the only sport you can’t do anything outside the team for 10months and reality is football is a 3.5 month only sport for 90% of its participants. Why kids are penalized for 6.5 months is archaic and should be challenged.
It will, once the right kid/family challenges it in court. It will be removed and opened up in a few years or so.
 
Agree but as you say “summer”. Football in Ohio has a 10month no play rule. Opening it up in June-July only is laughable.

It’s the only sport you can’t do anything outside the team for 10months and reality is football is a 3.5 month only sport for 90% of its participants. Why kids are penalized for 6.5 months is archaic and should be challenged.
It will, once the right kid/family challenges it in court. It will be removed and opened up in a few years or so.
Oh, I totally agree. Listing those schools was just to show that college coaches value 7V7 competition for evaluation purposes. It should absolutely be open in the Spring within the Evaluation period for college coaches to be able to go watch and evaluate kids. Especially in a violent game like football where a player can lose a season to an injury to not be able to show what they can do in competitions like 7V7 out of season is ridiculous.
 

Auggie

Well-known member
A lot of newer coaches, especially those that played NCAA football, want Ohio to not only adopt 7v7s but also spring football. I hope the OHSAA listens to these guys and gets with the times.
 
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