Word Question: Nouns Named after Verbs

Steel Valley FB

Well-known member
A couple examples I can think of are “drink” and “brush”. Nouns named after the action that one does with the object. Is there a name for these types of words? I’m sure people can come up with others.

Or, is it the opposite? Is the verb named after the noun? “Rake”, for example. I’d guess “rake” was a word before the rake was invented, but I could be wrong.

I know it’s a dumb topic, but I was just thinking about this the other day. Does anyone have some insight or other examples? I guess “shovel” would be another one.
 

cabezadecaballo

Well-known member
sh1t - first a verb in German; to pour


There's some content. Whether any value judgement is inferred, I'll let you decide. :D

F__k - first a verb in German; to bang against something
 
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Steel Valley FB

Well-known member
I like the direction you’re taking this. :)

Sh1t actually applies here as it’s the verb that produced the noun (or vice versa lol).

F—k would not apply here, by definition. Unless it could be a noun somehow relating to it as a verb.
 

D4fan

Well-known member
Actually, there are quite a few that the less learned used relating to agriculture. A common tool my dad would send me for was the PICK. An axe like tool but had a point rather than a sharpened blade.
 

D4fan

Well-known member
The water heading to the mill went down a RACE.

water coming out of the hillside from a spring was a RUN.
 

D4fan

Well-known member
Your plow left behind a FURROW. Once plowing was finished you would use the DISK ( I think disk is a verb first?) , then next you used the PLANTER. ( if you dont like the er suffix just go with PLANT, the live tissue springing up from the action of placing a seed in the soil)

Bet a few of you still make butter in your CHURN?
 
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D4fan

Well-known member
In sports you have the NET.

Which came first the verb post or the name for a piece of wood sticking out of the ground?

TIRE

ROPE

CHAIN

Then of course you have the nouns that became verbs which are more abundant. Telegraph, hoist, etc.
 
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foreword

Active member
I like the direction you’re taking this. :)

Sh1t actually applies here as it’s the verb that produced the noun (or vice versa lol).

F—k would not apply here, by definition. Unless it could be a noun somehow relating to it as a verb.
you can throw someone a F__k, or call someone a F__k.......those are nouns
 

Rohbino

Well-known member
I am editing this. I thought that I beat the auto censor by using an umlaut over the u (ü) but apparently it didn't work. What's weird is that when I edited this, f--k still appeared as I originally wrote it.

F--k is a great word and it's my favorite swear word. It's such a useful word. I think it can be 6 parts of speech:

Verb - don't f--k around with that
Noun - I really don't give a f--k
Adverb - f--k yeah, I'll go to the game
Adjective - that's f--king unbelievable!
Interjection - f--k! The lawnmower cut off my toe!
Pronoun - the Browns were disappointing again this year. They didn't do f--k

I don't think that f--k can be used as an article, conjunction, or preposition, but someone correct me if I'm wrong.
 
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D4fan

Well-known member
is a great word and it's my favorite swear word. It's such a useful word. I think it can be 6 parts of speech:

Verb - don't around with that
Noun - I really don't give a
Adverb - yeah, I'll go to the game
Adjective - that's ing unbelievable!
Interjection - ! The lawnmower cut off my toe!
Pronoun - the Browns were disappointing again this year. They didn't do

I don't think that can be used as an article, conjunction, or preposition, but someone correct me if I'm wrong.
I have heard it used as a conjunction but sounds grammatically awkward.
Dad used to tell me not to use improper adjectives, guess I should have obliged and used it as a noun or adverb.
 

Steel Valley FB

Well-known member
D4 has some great ones. Nice job.

Auggie that one is good too. I never would’ve thought of that usage, but I don’t “summer” anywhere except maybe Cedar Point lol. Season tickets for the kids.
 

Steel Valley FB

Well-known member
Your plow left behind a FURROW. Once plowing was finished you would use the DISK ( I think disk is a verb first?) , then next you used the PLANTER. ( if you dont like the er suffix just go with PLANT, the live tissue springing up from the action of placing a seed in the soil)

Bet a few of you still make butter in your CHURN?

You had another example in this post: PLOW the field with a PLOW.
 

Steel Valley FB

Well-known member
In sports you have the NET.

Which came first the verb post or the name for a piece of wood sticking out of the ground?

TIRE

ROPE

CHAIN

Then of course you have the nouns that became verbs which are more abundant. Telegraph, hoist, etc.

Is it common to say “Tire the car?” I’ve never heard it said, but I’m not in that business. Can you use NET in a sentence in your sports example? I’ve also never heard that used as a verb related to a sports net.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
So enough effort to be slightly critical, but not enough to add content. :)
Sorry, I wasn't intending to be even remotely critical. Re-reading my post I can see how it would give that impression. I meant to imply this wasn't something I would be good at and I'd be moving to the next thead. Apologies.
 
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