What's Your Heritage?

MentorGrad2002

Active member
Been digging through my family history to see my heritage. Dad's side has Cuba, Spain and France. Mom's side has Hungary and Germany.
I knew most of this already but still interested to learn more overall

So what is everyone's heritage on here if you'd like to share ? Curious to see how diverse the backgrounds are of people on this forum and Ohio in general. Also maybe say your hometown especially if it's from Ohio

I was born in Painesville but been in Mentor since I was very young.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Unless you are native American there has to be more to it
Indiginous didn't call it "America." They're only called "native Americans because the invaders deemed it so. :D So no, doesn't have to be more.

Me? I'm American. Mostly descended from 19th century immigrant with a bit not so willing. One of the grandma's had her wild side.
 

gneiss rocks

Active member
Mostly all Dutch /German both sides, my wife is the same.
We grew up went to the same high school, moved around came back hooked up then started a family in a town down the road...

We both wanted to move back to Maria Stein and after a couple years of looking we decided to buy a lot about a mile out of town and build.
Turns out my house is about 200 yards from the intersection of the 2 original homestead plots first sold to our last name ancestors in the early 1830s
Her moms side is a half mile from that and my moms side is a good ten miles away...we pretty much sit on the porch and play foggy mountain breakdown on the porch just waitin for strangers to pass by.

Oh I almost forgot... I am also 1/1023 native american.
 

clarkgriswold

Well-known member
Ancestry DAN testing is pretty cool. I found out I was more English and less Irish than I was led to believe.

My results were:
England, Wales & Northwestern Europe- 65%
Ireland & Scotland- 29%
Germanic Europe- 4%
Sweden- 2%
 

MentorGrad2002

Active member
Ancestry DAN testing is pretty cool. I found out I was more English and less Irish than I was led to believe.

My results were:
England, Wales & Northwestern Europe- 65%
Ireland & Scotland- 29%
Germanic Europe- 4%
Sweden- 2%
I liked it too. I did that one and 23 and me for fun. I had smaller amounts of things but it isn't specific

The 5 are listed are the predominant ones that I know about and the dna confirms. Funny thing is it's most Spain on one and France on the other ..

I had like 3 percent of british / Irish. Had polish and Ukraine small on some. Figured that was just overlap of German and Hungarian

And had less than 1 percent from Senegal and also native American. Still more than Liz Warren 1/1023. I think Senegal was .8 and native American was .5
 

arizonawildcat

Well-known member
OK, Mentor. Hudge vudge. That and egan are the the extent of my Hungarian vocabulary. I spent a week in Budapest (or Budapesch as the natives pronounce it) three or four years ago. Best food in any of the Central European countries, but the people just did not look very happy.
 

MentorGrad2002

Active member
OK, Mentor. Hudge vudge. That and egan are the the extent of my Hungarian vocabulary. I spent a week in Budapest (or Budapesch as the natives pronounce it) three or four years ago. Best food in any of the Central European countries, but the people just did not look very happy.
Never been to Europe but want to go to those ,4 countries I listed plus Italy someday.
 

cabezadecaballo

Well-known member
Dad's side all German.
Both of Mom's parents half German; one parent 1/4 Swiss and 1/4 Irish, her other side 1/4 Scottish, 1/8 Welsh and 1/8 Irish.

Some of my maternal grandmother's family arrived in Pennsylvania in the late 1600's.

Dad's dad was the first of his family born in the US. A great aunt, his sister, was turned away at Ellis Island 3 or 4 times. She had a "lazy eye", or divergent strabismus, and America didn't want her in their gene pool. My great grandfather would send back money for another berth on a steamship, and they'd detain her and send her back to Europe on the same boat each time. Finally she came back over at a time when her ship was claimed by the merchant marine for WWI, and they let her in.

She married a here a bit late in life, and had two sons decorated for military service. Solid contribution by her after all.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
OK, Mentor. Hudge vudge. That and egan are the the extent of my Hungarian vocabulary. I spent a week in Budapest (or Budapesch as the natives pronounce it) three or four years ago. Best food in any of the Central European countries, but the people just did not look very happy.
It's been almost two decades for me but I got the same impression! Maybe it's a city thing. City sure is beautiful though.

I'm not doing that ancestry thing for the same reason I don't do facebook. Too much illigitimate use. What you think is personal becomes public property. I saw where people are being convicted based upon someone elses DNA from those tests. Not sure I trust that and who would have the resources to fight it?
 

cabezadecaballo

Well-known member
It's been almost two decades for me but I got the same impression! Maybe it's a city thing. City sure is beautiful though.

I'm not doing that ancestry thing for the same reason I don't do facebook. Too much illigitimate use. What you think is personal becomes public property. I saw where people are being convicted based upon someone elses DNA from those tests. Not sure I trust that and who would have the resources to fight it?

Stay away from FaceApp, too. Potential for illegitimate use is certainly granted in the permissions required to download the application.
 

irish_buffalo

Well-known member
88% British Isles (Wales, England, Scotland, Ireland - all about the same).
8% Sweden
4% German

Family is "Irish Catholic". Always wondered how you really break down the difference in people from Wales and England or England and Scotland? I'm sure there are "markers" but they have to be skewed right?

I did grow up in a Hungarian neighborhood so I ate lots of Szalonna Bread (Grease Bread or aka Hunky Turkey). Still have it once or twice a summer.

 

Sig Hansen

Active member
German and German/Ukrainian

Family on my dad's side moved from Germany to Odessa, Ukraine in the late 1700's-early 1800's along with thousands of other "Black Sea Germans", then got kicked out of Ukraine by the Russians in 1895 and settled in North Dakota. Mom's side moved here from Germany in 1919. Odessa is on my bucket list of places to visit for this reason
 
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ohiopup

Active member
If you are what you eat... then I am...
1/2 kitty-kat +1/2 pizza +1/2 Kibbeh

I think I'm some how related to Yogi Berra.

:>---
 

Mr. Slippery

Active member
If what I’ve always been told is accurate:
1/4 Hungarian and 1/4 Romanian from my dad’s side, a bunch of different nationalities on my mom’s side: English, Welsh, German, Swiss, possibly also Belgian and French (Alsace region). Dad’s family’s USA roots go back to his grandparents in the ballpark of 1900-1910. Some of Mom’s roots in the USA can be traced back to Colonial times.
 

arizonawildcat

Well-known member
In 1977 I went to Ireland and went to Achill Island where my maternal grandmother was born. A lot of West side Clevelanders can trace part of their ancestry to Achill. Anyway, I had the name of something like fourth cousins and visited them out of the blue. They were living in the traditional three-room Irish cottage and they treated me like visiting royalty. They were almost awestruck by the "grand" car I was driving, a 1976 Ford, They invited me to spend the night, but I told them I already had room booked in a B&B. In return for their kindness, I invited them to the local pub and said all the drinks for my relatives were on me. Word got around quickly and the pub was soon packed with all sorts of my relatives, probably up to seventh cousins. It was worth it becaue the next day they took me to the cottage where my grandmother was born in 1890, again the traditional three-room cottage. She came to America in 1914 in the steerage class aboard the Luisitania. The thatched roof was long gone and sheep were grazing throughout the cottage. It was an incredibly moving experience for me. I drove around the Island and thanked God for giving her the wisdom to leave that desolate place. Strong winds off the Atlantic, so much so that no trees grew on the Island.
 

irish_buffalo

Well-known member
In 1977 I went to Ireland and went to Achill Island where my maternal grandmother was born. A lot of West side Clevelanders can trace part of their ancestry to Achill. Anyway, I had the name of something like fourth cousins and visited them out of the blue. They were living in the traditional three-room Irish cottage and they treated me like visiting royalty. They were almost awestruck by the "grand" car I was driving, a 1976 Ford, They invited me to spend the night, but I told them I already had room booked in a B&B. In return for their kindness, I invited them to the local pub and said all the drinks for my relatives were on me. Word got around quickly and the pub was soon packed with all sorts of my relatives, probably up to seventh cousins. It was worth it becaue the next day they took me to the cottage where my grandmother was born in 1890, again the traditional three-room cottage. She came to America in 1914 in the steerage class aboard the Luisitania. The thatched roof was long gone and sheep were grazing throughout the cottage. It was an incredibly moving experience for me. I drove around the Island and thanked God for giving her the wisdom to leave that desolate place. Strong winds off the Atlantic, so much so that no trees grew on the Island.
So there is good in you! Very cool story. Thanks for sharing.
 

Zunardo

Active member
WV hillbilly on my mom's side - I guess mostly British, possibly some French.

Polish on my father's side.
 

cabezadecaballo

Well-known member
In 1977 I went to Ireland and went to Achill Island where my maternal grandmother was born. A lot of West side Clevelanders can trace part of their ancestry to Achill. Anyway, I had the name of something like fourth cousins and visited them out of the blue. They were living in the traditional three-room Irish cottage and they treated me like visiting royalty. They were almost awestruck by the "grand" car I was driving, a 1976 Ford, They invited me to spend the night, but I told them I already had room booked in a B&B. In return for their kindness, I invited them to the local pub and said all the drinks for my relatives were on me. Word got around quickly and the pub was soon packed with all sorts of my relatives, probably up to seventh cousins. It was worth it becaue the next day they took me to the cottage where my grandmother was born in 1890, again the traditional three-room cottage. She came to America in 1914 in the steerage class aboard the Luisitania. The thatched roof was long gone and sheep were grazing throughout the cottage. It was an incredibly moving experience for me. I drove around the Island and thanked God for giving her the wisdom to leave that desolate place. Strong winds off the Atlantic, so much so that no trees grew on the Island.

Like Aruba, but colder, with sod and potatoes. Got it.

One of the County Mayo crew, huh ? I knew I liked ya fer sumpthin'

My paternal great-grandfather, whom I never met, was a stone mason when he came over from Europe. Displaced Schwarzwald Kraut living in Hungary.

Large construction jobs could last for years in those days, so he rented a new home every time he got a new job. Get a job, find a good tavern nearby, and then rent a house - kind of near, but far enough to sober up a bit on the walk home. My grandfather and I spent one fine Saturday with me driving him all around Cleveland as he showed me every place he had lived. Some homes were gone and some still stood, but even if the homes were gone, the locations triggered many memories for him to pass on.

I'd love to see where I came from in Germany some time. One of these days.
 
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