Students falling behind?

USA70PP

Well-known member
Regardless of what is being said, this is no longer a medical pandemic it has become a political pandemic.
 

CedarBuck92

Active member
and then what do you do? You pass them, then that's education they'll never get. You fail them and risk the wrath of the "they ain't ever gonna use this, pass them all" soci... uh teacher dept.

Someone with a brain needs to start building some flexibility. Particularly at the higher grades. No one has a right to a diploma. At the same time, is it right to force a kid into another year when they've already that plan to find a blue collar or service job, maybe already have it? They need to relax the credits needed, the four year demands in core areas particularly, while also giving kids the option to say, "I want more," be they high school or early college credits. This is particularly important for those with college plans that haven't been able to complete pre-requisit preparations.
While I do think flexibility would be nice I think a bigger issue is consistency. It makes no sense that my brother who is currently a senior needs 28 credits to get his diploma (not honors or anything special just the regular one) and his friend who goes to a different school in the same county needs 21. Also I don't think schools should be able to limit how many credits of a single subject you take in a year. If I had been allowed to take 2 English credits my junior year I could have graduated a year early but I had to come back and take a full 7 class schedule so I could get the 1 class I actually needed to graduate.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
While I do think flexibility would be nice I think a bigger issue is consistency. It makes no sense that my brother who is currently a senior needs 28 credits to get his diploma (not honors or anything special just the regular one) and his friend who goes to a different school in the same county needs 21. Also I don't think schools should be able to limit how many credits of a single subject you take in a year. If I had been allowed to take 2 English credits my junior year I could have graduated a year early but I had to come back and take a full 7 class schedule so I could get the 1 class I actually needed to graduate.
The credit issue is local. I looked at state requirements and theirs is 20. I think you'd get a LOT of push-back asking state to provide that consistency you're looking for. Local communities and boards want that decision soley in their hands.

Limiting credits per course is probably also a local issue. What happens if a kid fails a subject? They can't take two English courses? I've seen some private schools try that but they're wanting a bit of $$, uh, feel it is very important a kid gets that four year exposure to their curriculum, which is like every other curriculum.
 

CedarBuck92

Active member
The credit issue is local. I looked at state requirements and theirs is 20. I think you'd get a LOT of push-back asking state to provide that consistency you're looking for. Local communities and boards want that decision soley in their hands.

Limiting credits per course is probably also a local issue. What happens if a kid fails a subject? They can't take two English courses? I've seen some private schools try that but they're wanting a bit of $$, uh, feel it is very important a kid gets that four year exposure to their curriculum, which is like every other curriculum.
Both issues are local for sure. I am just venting my frustration on the lack of consistency.

As for the issue of a kid failing a course. For our district they are then put into either summer school or credit recovery. Credit recovery is a way to take a missing class in an online environment but is done while still taking your normal course load.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Both issues are local for sure. I am just venting my frustration on the lack of consistency.

As for the issue of a kid failing a course. For our district they are then put into either summer school or credit recovery. Credit recovery is a way to take a missing class in an online environment but is done while still taking your normal course load.
ah, so the failures have a leg up on this remote learning! See, they knew what they were doing.
 
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