OHSAA does not allow kids to play 7on7

TigerPaw

Well-known member
I don’t know why you would do 7 on 7 football if you weren’t looking to play at the next level. That seems to be the motivation for that. You can do everything else you need for football development without doing AAU 7 on 7. Not saying AAU basketball or any other traveling sports isn’t viable. At least you are playing the actual game of softball, volleyball, basketball, etc. in other AAU sports. Football 7 on 7 is not actual football like another poster said.

I think kids looking for schollies would prioritize 11 man tackle, but that is a minority. And some of them would do both if they could. Other kids (and/or their parents) would prefer 7 on 7 because they think it is more fun and safer. If it was offered I could only see it only growing in popularity. Some kids might even develop enough in 7 man that they go out for 11 man and/or play more. Especially lower levels. Some kids don't mature that way (mentally or physically) till 7-8-9th grade.

Just playing devil's advocate.
 

TOLedo

New member
Yes it is. If a coach tells you they watch a recruits 7 on 7 film from summer I wouldn’t trust anything else that coach says.
You clearly aren’t a college coach. 7v7 is how they find the kids now a days. Yeah they judge game film more strictly but 7v7 is crucial to show you can compete athletically
 

Insane92

Well-known member
You clearly aren’t a college coach. 7v7 is how they find the kids now a days. Yeah they judge game film more strictly but 7v7 is crucial to show you can compete athletically
No, it’s not. Colleges still rely on game film and kids coming to summer camps to work out in front of coaches. How else do you think they get tangible measurables/measurements than at camps in the summer ether at their campus or coaches camping elsewhere working camps? Definitely not at 7 on 7 events. Good try though.
 

bucksman

Moderator
The off-season 7v7 circuit exists because an 11v11 club circuit is not viable for various reasons.
At the highest levels, these 7v7 events are being evaluated heavily. Probably moreso by Scout and 247, but the colleges are out there identifying which elite athletes can compete at the most elite level doing football type skills

If Ohio allowed football players to participate in the 7v7 circuit, it probably would happen in the same way that every other sport's off-season clubs happen. Max of 5 kids allowed on a club team from a given high school team and so forth outside of June & July. Member schools could lobby for it to happen if they viewed it to be in the best interest of their student-athletes and football program development.
 

xhscoach

Well-known member
The fact that most of the posters on this thread don’t understand why basketball, baseball, track, volleyball, etc. can compete Year round, coupled with the fact that they don’t understand CFB recruiting, is all I need to know about the knowledge base of posters.
 

SWGA Fan

Member
Who cares. College coaches across all levels don’t care about 7 on 7 film. They care what you put on tape in actual games.
Then, withOUT 7 on 7, how do you get better? This tells me that Ohio MAY not emphasize the passing game, like other states do. My lil high school won the two largest passing league tourney's in the state, at Collin's Hill and The Kirby Smart 7 on 7 in Athens. It also afforded our coaching staff, to .put on display, our best WR and TE. After the performances by Ny Carr and Landon Thomas, Coach Smart got verbal commitments from both, for 2024. (predicted to be the best recruiting class in NCAA HISTORY)

And that expertise took us to a seven point exit in the semifinals of the largest level of play in the state. Without a sophisticated passing game. I don't think that we would have won our conference. Because you weren't running on the 2022 Valdosta Wildcats, with their three Power Five DL.
 

SWGA Fan

Member
The off-season 7v7 circuit exists because an 11v11 club circuit is not viable for various reasons.
At the highest levels, these 7v7 events are being evaluated heavily. Probably moreso by Scout and 247, but the colleges are out there identifying which elite athletes can compete at the most elite level doing football type skills

If Ohio allowed football players to participate in the 7v7 circuit, it probably would happen in the same way that every other sport's off-season clubs happen. Max of 5 kids allowed on a club team from a given high school team and so forth outside of June & July. Member schools could lobby for it to happen if they viewed it to be in the best interest of their student-athletes and football program development.
Lack of an interest in 7 on 7 in Ohio, may be the reason for the disparity between the talent levels in your state and states in the SEC.

Have you ever heard of Ladd McConkey? He was a walk on at UGA, and he'll one day be playing on SUNDAY! And he garnered interest from 7 on 7 in the North Georgia hills. And he lived closer to Knoxville than Athens.***ROTFLMAO***
 

SWGA Fan

Member
And they barely care about that anymore. It’s more about athletic ability than football skills these days. They’ll coach up a great athlete, even if they aren’t the greatest football player.
That lack of interest in development, may be why Ohio ranks WAAAAY down the list for Power Five athletes.
 

SWGA Fan

Member
The fact that most of the posters on this thread don’t understand why basketball, baseball, track, volleyball, etc. can compete Year round, coupled with the fact that they don’t understand CFB recruiting, is all I need to know about the knowledge base of posters.
EGADS!!!!!!!!!!!! Let's not be hurting anybody's feelins.o_O
 

TOLedo

New member
No, it’s not. Colleges still rely on game film and kids coming to summer camps to work out in front of coaches. How else do you think they get tangible measurables/measurements than at camps in the summer ether at their campus or coaches camping elsewhere working camps? Definitely not at 7 on 7 events. Good try though.
You’re wrong. Bottom line.
 

AugMer

Member
So once again why do other states have 7 - 7 if there is no real benefit.
Like everything else when it comes to travel sports, because people profit off of it. Travel 7 on 7 may be up there with travel baseball in how much of a scam money maker it can be.

Now coaches want there teams for the 7 on 7 so they stay away from the flag football coaches that is 7 on 7. At least summer baseball correlates to the game. Imagine having to coach your athlete in your offense and skill set during school season after they had some random money hungry 7 on 7 guy teaching them different plays etc.

If the OHSAA and Coaches association made 7 on 7 available year round but it must be with your school, you would still see a large cry from people, and that is from the ones who profit off of it.

Edit - If were really worried about getting kids scholarships then we need to implement more camps in the state for kids to show their skills. Ironton I believe is a good example of this because of the amount of exposure they bring to their kids. People are right though, college coaches don't care too much about travel 7 on 7 teams.
 

Stirred not Shaken

Well-known member
Like everything else when it comes to travel sports, because people profit off of it. Travel 7 on 7 may be up there with travel baseball in how much of a scam money maker it can be.

Now coaches want there teams for the 7 on 7 so they stay away from the flag football coaches that is 7 on 7. At least summer baseball correlates to the game. Imagine having to coach your athlete in your offense and skill set during school season after they had some random money hungry 7 on 7 guy teaching them different plays etc.

If the OHSAA and Coaches association made 7 on 7 available year round but it must be with your school, you would still see a large cry from people, and that is from the ones who profit off of it.

Edit - If were really worried about getting kids scholarships then we need to implement more camps in the state for kids to show their skills. Ironton I believe is a good example of this because of the amount of exposure they bring to their kids. People are right though, college coaches don't care too much about travel 7 on 7 teams.
Again, if it had no benefit other than to line someone's pockets, I doubt these 7 - 7 AAU organizations would survive. However, I am a big fan of choice if a parent wants to waste their money on a 7 on 7 circuit they should be allowed to do so. Amazes me how many people on here are a against parents and children's freedom of choice.
 

HomeRun10

Active member
The problem with this and "spring Football" is the time. Football is a sport that coaches have their hands on more than any other sport. When football season ends, the next season begins basically December 1. Kids are in the weight room with the coaches, come June 1 they are with the coaches from that day until the season ends come November. If you want to add spring FB or 7 on 7 time you have to make time available in the other seasons to allow this. Baseball has travel baseball, it is played when their season ends throughout the summer when no other sport is mandatory, AAU and JO is played throughout the spring, but they are played on dates that make their athletes available to still play a spring sport. You do Spring football you are going to kill your spring teams, especially at the D3 and D4 level which is your D5-7 in football, yes they are the smaller divisions and we all know the big schools could care less about them, however, You are not going to make it available for only some. Unless you are willing to cut basketball season down to 20 games and cut two weeks of the season off and then don't start BB/Track until March, there isn't time available to fit spring football in with both Track and Baseball going into June.
 

14Red

Well-known member
High school is the new college. Kids/ parents are paying thousands of dollars annually for them to play travel ball and all different levels. Many of these kids are not even college level athletes and frankly, by the time these kids are 17-18 years old, especially girls, they are so burned out of sports that college sports isn't even an option. And unless you are D1 athlete, you're likely getting next to nothing in aid or pay.

Travel sports/ AAU is big business out there folks. There are cities building indoor/ outdoor turf facilities because you have thousands of kids coming to play in weekend tournamens, eating in local restaurants and staying in local hotels. If you truly believe your kid is a D1 type athlete, have at it, but otherwise, your just paying for your kid to play a sport. My safer route would be to play all the jr. high, high school sports you can. There is no need to play ANY sport for more than 6 months a year for about 90% of athletes.
 

14Red

Well-known member
I will say it again. Why can every other sport play year round but football has a ton of rules preventing the same thing.
My guess with football there is alot more liability in with injuries. Also, and many are not going to like this, of the major team sports, football is the one you can spend the least amount of time with. In basketball and baseball, there are many fine motor skills that take time to develop. Football is still mostly running, jumping, tackling, catching. Yes the QB needs to put in some extra time, but it's not like you're going to throw a football 500 times a day for 9 months, it would create arm issues.
I've never understood the attraction to football in the point that you spend so much time in practice vs. game. Kids will lift, to training for 7-8 months, then have football practice 4-5 days for - at the high school level, only 10 games?
 

Spartacus1987

Active member
The problem with this and "spring Football" is the time. Football is a sport that coaches have their hands on more than any other sport. When football season ends, the next season begins basically December 1. Kids are in the weight room with the coaches, come June 1 they are with the coaches from that day until the season ends come November. If you want to add spring FB or 7 on 7 time you have to make time available in the other seasons to allow this. Baseball has travel baseball, it is played when their season ends throughout the summer when no other sport is mandatory, AAU and JO is played throughout the spring, but they are played on dates that make their athletes available to still play a spring sport. You do Spring football you are going to kill your spring teams, especially at the D3 and D4 level which is your D5-7 in football, yes they are the smaller divisions and we all know the big schools could care less about them, however, You are not going to make it available for only some. Unless you are willing to cut basketball season down to 20 games and cut two weeks of the season off and then don't start BB/Track until March, there isn't time available to fit spring football in with both Track and Baseball going into June.
What you say is true and I spoke to a HS coach about this and the basketball season would need to be cut short about two weeks which isn't too much at all. On the OSU podcast yesterday with Bobby Carpenter he made mention that spring football should be allowed but not everyone has to participate if they don't want to. Of course the baseball teams going deep into the playoffs and small schools would opt out but that still leaves ALOT of schools that could absolutely be doing spring ball. Justin Zwick also is starting to majorly complain about the lack of development in Ohio and these are guys that are from our state. The drum is starting to BEAT VERY LOUD for spring football and to allow our kids to participate in 7 on 7 during the school year.

We are already screwed because the kids in the southeast are bigger, faster, longer than our kids in the midwest but not they are getting even better development which never used to be as big of a thing. This is a MASSIVE problem.
 

Spartacus1987

Active member
Ask ANY high school coach in the SEC, if 7 on 7 is important?
Agreed, no doubt real film matters but these coaches are able to see if these kids can run against other great athletes in 7 v 7. That's just common sense. It's at these 7 v 7 events that these kids are first getting noticed. It's sad how far behind Ohio is and I fear it's only going to get worse. We only have ONE kid in the 247 composite top 100 for 2024 and 2025 :/
 

14Red

Well-known member
So once again why do other states have 7 - 7 if there is no real benefit.
Because football coaches want to keep football players engaged year around for fear of losing them. Football is a numbers game. So you have lifting up north when it's cold out 3/4 times weekly and then when it's nice out, you have 7 on 7's or other planned workouts.

Back in the day, you didn't see the football coach until early August, no one did anything in the summer except play baseball and swim. Two-a-days for two weeks, a scrimmage or two and you were ready for the season.
 

reganaustinjames

Well-known member
What you say is true and I spoke to a HS coach about this and the basketball season would need to be cut short about two weeks which isn't too much at all. On the OSU podcast yesterday with Bobby Carpenter he made mention that spring football should be allowed but not everyone has to participate if they don't want to. Of course the baseball teams going deep into the playoffs and small schools would opt out but that still leaves ALOT of schools that could absolutely be doing spring ball. Justin Zwick also is starting to majorly complain about the lack of development in Ohio and these are guys that are from our state. The drum is starting to BEAT VERY LOUD for spring football and to allow our kids to participate in 7 on 7 during the school year.

We are already screwed because the kids in the southeast are bigger, faster, longer than our kids in the midwest but not they are getting even better development which never used to be as big of a thing. This is a MASSIVE problem.
Ok, so schools should massively re-arrange their offseason and spring sports schedules because Ohio is, comparatively, slipping behind other states in a sport that's more conducive to being played year-round in those other states? And they should do so because the number of kids that have any shot at playing at the next level total about 1% of all football players, and it helps the preparation of that 1%? And in a sport where participation numbers have been on the decline for about 20 years, we should institute 2-3 weeks of non-competitive injury-risking participation that may cause a measurable portion of that other 99% to determine it's just not worth it? Though football is the revenue driver, it's not the end-all be-all; for most of these kids; it's an opportunity to have fun with their friends, and that can be said for the other sports that would be affected by this.

For all the reasons mentioned above (and delineated wonderfully in HomeRun10's post from earlier today), spring football will NEVER happen in Ohio. And shouldn't.

I could maybe in the future allowing for some provision allowing interstate 7 on 7 competition (though again, <1% of kids would do it), but Ohio 1) is VERY slow moving compared to most states on making changes, and 2) has a pretty acrimonious past with organizations like the AAU... but that's for another thread.
 

The Dock

Well-known member
What you say is true and I spoke to a HS coach about this and the basketball season would need to be cut short about two weeks which isn't too much at all. On the OSU podcast yesterday with Bobby Carpenter he made mention that spring football should be allowed but not everyone has to participate if they don't want to. Of course the baseball teams going deep into the playoffs and small schools would opt out but that still leaves ALOT of schools that could absolutely be doing spring ball. Justin Zwick also is starting to majorly complain about the lack of development in Ohio and these are guys that are from our state. The drum is starting to BEAT VERY LOUD for spring football and to allow our kids to participate in 7 on 7 during the school year.

We are already screwed because the kids in the southeast are bigger, faster, longer than our kids in the midwest but not they are getting even better development which never used to be as big of a thing. This is a MASSIVE problem.
Bobby’s beating that drum only because the HS program his family’s been linked into for three decades, which is one of the state’s largest public schools, would see kids transfer in from the surrounding schools for that specific purpose.
 

hammer89

Well-known member
Bobby’s beating that drum only because the HS program his family’s been linked into for three decades, which is one of the state’s largest public schools, would see kids transfer in from the surrounding schools for that specific purpose.
I would love someone to ask Bobby why he hasn’t lambasted said school, or any school for that matter, for not filing a petition to have the rule changed, instead of only blaming the OHSAA. Easier to just shout than actually work towards what you want, I guess.
 

winbypin

Well-known member
What you say is true and I spoke to a HS coach about this and the basketball season would need to be cut short about two weeks which isn't too much at all. On the OSU podcast yesterday with Bobby Carpenter he made mention that spring football should be allowed but not everyone has to participate if they don't want to. Of course the baseball teams going deep into the playoffs and small schools would opt out but that still leaves ALOT of schools that could absolutely be doing spring ball. Justin Zwick also is starting to majorly complain about the lack of development in Ohio and these are guys that are from our state. The drum is starting to BEAT VERY LOUD for spring football and to allow our kids to participate in 7 on 7 during the school year.

We are already screwed because the kids in the southeast are bigger, faster, longer than our kids in the midwest but not they are getting even better development which never used to be as big of a thing. This is a MASSIVE problem.
It's only a MASSIVE problem for about 5% of the kids playing highschool football. Maybe even less.

And I don't see how 7v7 will fix genetics.

And I think they should be allowed to play 7v7. I just think your argument is all wrong.
 

chs1971

Well-known member
Then, withOUT 7 on 7, how do you get better? This tells me that Ohio MAY not emphasize the passing game, like other states do. My lil high school won the two largest passing league tourney's in the state, at Collin's Hill and The Kirby Smart 7 on 7 in Athens. It also afforded our coaching staff, to .put on display, our best WR and TE. After the performances by Ny Carr and Landon Thomas, Coach Smart got verbal commitments from both, for 2024. (predicted to be the best recruiting class in NCAA HISTORY)

And that expertise took us to a seven point exit in the semifinals of the largest level of play in the state. Without a sophisticated passing game. I don't think that we would have won our conference. Because you weren't running on the 2022 Valdosta Wildcats, with their three Power Five DL.
During winter? Go play basketball or wrestle.
 
Can someone please explain to me why they think Ohio is falling behind talent wise? Ohio state has 6 starters from Ohio and 2 starters from Georgia. Did Ohio State look far behind compared to Georgia? There isn't anything broken with the rule. There isn't a problem that needs to be fixed. This is all because Kirby Smart made one comment.
 
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