Ohio HS - Boys - Pole Vault - Yearly Leaders

JAVMAN83

Active member
Something I've started to compile on the same spreadsheet as my all-time lists is the listing of Yearly Leading marks per each event. While my all-time lists are working towards a top-100 (yes, you read that, THREE digits - 100), I thought it would be interesting to start compiling the leading marks per event, per year. Since some of my data goes back to 1888, well, ....it'll be years in the making

Here's a snippet of the boys' pole vault to date (from 1892 currently).

Feel free to let me know if this is of interest to anyone.

Rows in BLACK represent probable bests for the year. Rows or information in RED represent possible best yearly marks, but more research to be done. Blank information is exactly that...TBD.

Update #1 - 5 July 2019 - Correction to 1986 yearly leader added
 

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JAVMAN83

Active member
Interesting look back
Thanks. That's a lot of the fun in it for me as a T&F nut & history buff. Reading about athletic endeavors of the past, thinking about what-if scenarios of those athletes competing against today's athletes if they'd had the same equipment as we do today. There were some real studs 100 years ago!
 
I was at a 4th of July parade in Medina yesterday and ran crossed paths with John Coyne (state pole vault champ - 16'4"). I mentioned to him that there is a list on yappi about PV leaders by year. I said that it was too bad that his vault came indoors that year at the outdoor state meet. He said that the AAA pole vault was moved indoors that year on the first day of the meet (Friday). However, he said that the AA pole vault was held outdoors on Saturday where he vaulted 16"4" to win the meet. Who is right?
 

JAVMAN83

Active member
I was at a 4th of July parade in Medina yesterday and ran crossed paths with John Coyne (state pole vault champ - 16'4"). I mentioned to him that there is a list on yappi about PV leaders by year. I said that it was too bad that his vault came indoors that year at the outdoor state meet. He said that the AAA pole vault was moved indoors that year on the first day of the meet (Friday). However, he said that the AA pole vault was held outdoors on Saturday where he vaulted 16"4" to win the meet. Who is right?
Thank you for that input. I will go back and look deep into my data and make the correction if necessary. If I've made a mistake in reading past data, my profound apologies and I'll bump him up!

FYI - The list has been updated to reflect Mr. Coyne's OUTDOOR vault of 16' 4" at the State meet in 1986. I've confirmed through several sources what Mr. Coyne already communicated. Thanks for the heads up!
 
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The situation with the '86 vault brings a question I have for you record keepers. Do you consider indoor and outdoor track and field seasons or venues? If the '86 state meet pole vault was moved inside due to weather I understand Coyne's mark would not count for outdoor due to lack of wind and other factors. But would it count for indoor marks in your eyes? There is a big advantage to pole vaulting in June versus winter due to practice, opportunities, and other things. But if you look at it as venues would you count this effort? If a tent was put over the track at the outdoor state meet, would you call it indoor? How did Jack Shepard view these situations? I had this situation with a vaulter I coached in '79 and did not count it for an indoor school record but would like to hear other opinions.
 

JAVMAN83

Active member
The situation with the '86 vault brings a question I have for you record keepers. Do you consider indoor and outdoor track and field seasons or venues? If the '86 state meet pole vault was moved inside due to weather I understand Coyne's mark would not count for outdoor due to lack of wind and other factors. But would it count for indoor marks in your eyes? There is a big advantage to pole vaulting in June versus winter due to practice, opportunities, and other things. But if you look at it as venues would you count this effort? If a tent was put over the track at the outdoor state meet, would you call it indoor? How did Jack Shepard view these situations? I had this situation with a vaulter I coached in '79 and did not count it for an indoor school record but would like to hear other opinions.
T&F News considers indoor marks ANY TIME of year. I know of a number of recent indoor PV national records that were set undercover outside of the normal indoor season.

While the IAAF & USATF don't distinguish between indoor & outdoor field event marks for record purposes (an asinine decision if there ever was one, IMHO), statisticians do and annotate indoor marks with an "i" next to the performance.

Having been a primarily field event guy myself during my earlier life, equating the two are apples & oranges from the aspect of not only weather considerations, but surface & implement considerations. An indoor shot is NOT the same as an outdoor one just because the mass of the shot is the same. Indoor shots are typically larger and have more distributed mass than outdoor shots, in general. Different feeling in the hand as well. As for the jumps & vault, completely different surface feel as well, especially if those surfaces have wood or other "softer" materials as the underlying structure. Just so many differences.
 

JAVMAN83

Active member
As for your guy in '79, it should've counted as an indoor mark. Each school has its own "rules" for what counts as their school record. Another topic, altogether.
 
An indoor shot is NOT the same as an outdoor one just because the mass of the shot is the same. Indoor shots are typically larger and have more distributed mass than outdoor shots, in general. Different feeling in the hand as well.
I doubt they would ever move the shot put indoor even if they had to throw in driving rain. But if they did I assume they would have to use an indoor shot which is something totally different in many respects than what it took to qualify. There are some interesting dilemmas.
 

JAVMAN83

Active member
I doubt they would ever move the shot put indoor even if they had to throw in driving rain. But if they did I assume they would have to use an indoor shot which is something totally different in many respects than what it took to qualify. There are some interesting dilemmas.
I agree, I don't think they'd ever move the shot indoor. I've competed in some downpours myself as well as coached in them. There were a couple of times though that the combination of the rain and the dirt on the throwing surface did become dangerous for the athlete. I had some shot putters of mine that used the rotational technique darn near break their necks on extremely slippery surfaces. That said, however, I don't see the throws going undercover due to the weather.
 

JAVMAN83

Active member
Upcoming correction to be made in a future release:

All-time HS pole vault star, MIKE Hagely of Ashville, 1912-1914 State Champion and 1915 runner-up, was incorrectly identified as Paul Hagely. Further research has determined finality on his first name, along with a number of other early 20th century Ashville stars. Mr. Hagely ended up spending 39 years at Columbus North HS, serving in many capacities within North and also OHSAA. His 11' 7 1/8" vault at the 1914 State meet was an Ohio HS record at the time, but was succeeded the next year by 1/8" (11' 7 1/4") by Lisbon's Roy Easterday at the 1915 HS portion of the "Big Six" meet at Akron.
 
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