Neil Young

eastside_purple

Well-known member
I'd think it was an endorsement of Alabama the state, in response to https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/neilyoung/alabama.html , if anything related to Young.

Friends jab at each other. Friends differ in political leanings. "A southern man don't need you around....anyhow" doesn't mean "adversary"
The quoted line was more, southern men know about the issue and don’t need Neil Young to preach to them verses an FU, which is how the white south red neck took it.
 

Steel Valley FB

Well-known member
I won two front row Neil Young tickets from QFM-96 back in the early 2000s at Polaris Amphitheater...the day I had to leave for Warren for a wedding of my best friend at the time. Concert was that night so I gave them to my buddy who bartended at the Bethel BW3 in return for as much free draft beer as I could drink there (I lived behind there on Slade Ave) and another generous party gift.

To this day, it’s my biggest missed-concert regret ever. I had a falling out with the groom a couple years later and I haven’t seen the bartender in over 10 years. He owns the Park St Tavern now, if any local people know who I mean...but I don’t drink anymore lol.
 

Steel Valley FB

Well-known member
It’s one of the great misconceptions in rock that sweet home was a criticism of Neil Young, when in fact it was an endorsement and Ronnie and Neil were in fact very good friends.
The “feud” that never really existed got blown out of proportion by fans, in typical fashion...but Young was definitely being critical of Alabama. In fact, he’s on record saying he regrets writing the infamous lines because, subsequently, many people in Alabama took offense at being painted with such a broad brush. He also said, looking back, they were lyrics that could too easily be misconstrued.

Skynyrd’s comeback lines were then definitely in direct response to Young’s lyrics, but were more a lighthearted jab than an attack. Van Zant is on record saying as much and that they were just trying to be witty. He’s also on record saying in so many words that Young was unfairly critical of many southerners who didn’t fit that stereotype, but they weren’t being malicious toward Young. Make no mistake though...it was not an “endorsement” of Young in any shape or form.

They did in fact become friends shortly after the whole overblown affair, but were simply admirers of each other artistically before it occurred. They were not good friends prior. A couple years after those songs in question became famous for implying that bad blood existed, Young wrote three songs that he gave to Skynyrd with hopes they’d record them, but the plane crash took place before that could unfold. Young later released all three songs on various albums. Ronnie VZ is on the cover of the famous Street Survivors album wearing a Neil Young shirt - a shirt that he often wore in concert just to mess with overzealous fans. There’s actually an urban legend that RVZ was buried in that same shirt and that some fans have tried to dig up his grave to prove it.

Honestly, though, and we all know this....had RVZ really been pissed at Neil Young, he’d have walked up to Young, Ronnie likely in bare feet, and kicked his Canadian ___. :)
 

eastside_purple

Well-known member
The “feud” that never really existed got blown out of proportion by fans, in typical fashion...but Young was definitely being critical of Alabama. In fact, he’s on record saying he regrets writing the infamous lines because, subsequently, many people in Alabama took offense at being painted with such a broad brush. He also said, looking back, they were lyrics that could too easily be misconstrued.

Skynyrd’s comeback lines were then definitely in direct response to Young’s lyrics, but were more a lighthearted jab than an attack. Van Zant is on record saying as much and that they were just trying to be witty. He’s also on record saying in so many words that Young was unfairly critical of many southerners who didn’t fit that stereotype, but they weren’t being malicious toward Young. Make no mistake though...it was not an “endorsement” of Young in any shape or form.

They did in fact become friends shortly after the whole overblown affair, but were simply admirers of each other artistically before it occurred. They were not good friends prior. A couple years after those songs in question became famous for implying that bad blood existed, Young wrote three songs that he gave to Skynyrd with hopes they’d record them, but the plane crash took place before that could unfold. Young later released all three songs on various albums. Ronnie VZ is on the cover of the famous Street Survivors album wearing a Neil Young shirt - a shirt that he often wore in concert just to mess with overzealous fans. There’s actually an urban legend that RVZ was buried in that same shirt and that some fans have tried to dig up his grave to prove it.

Honestly, though, and we all know this....had RVZ really been pissed at Neil Young, he’d have walked up to Young, Ronnie likely in bare feet, and kicked his Canadian ___. :)
Of course Young was being critical of Alabama and the rest of the south. Endorsement may not have been the correct word, but my point was while RVZ and LS thought Young was lumping all southerners together in a negative stereotype, they definitely shared his views of the south’s racial views at the time.
 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
... Young wrote three songs that he gave to Skynyrd with hopes they’d record them, but the plane crash took place before that could unfold. Young later released all three songs on various albums. …
"Powderfinger" was one of the songs that Neil wrote for Skynyrd. I don't know what the other two were, but a Lynyrd Skynyrd southern-rockin' version of "Powderfinger" would have been awesome!
 
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