Mondo Duplantis world record.

It doesn't hurt to have world class genetics and start before the age of 5. His father was a world class vaulter and either had or was close to the national high school record in the mid-late 70's. His mother was a Swedish national team heptathlete.
 

madman

Well-known member
I watched the street vault competition a week or two ago and thought he would get the record that night. He and Kendricks were amazing that night. His hip height over the bar was unreal. It wasn't to be as he essentially ran out of daylight and the artificial lighting wasn't sufficient to continue.
 
I watched the street vault competition a week or two ago and thought he would get the record that night. He and Kendricks were amazing that night. His hip height over the bar was unreal. It wasn't to be as he essentially ran out of daylight and the artificial lighting wasn't sufficient to continue.
After his first two vaults Saturday I thought I would be disappointed if he did not get the record. He was so high on his second vault of the competition that he was nearly out of control and shook his head afterward at how crazy it was. Those first two vaults made me anticipate something special was coming. Kind of like what you are describing.
 

JAVMAN83

Well-known member
It doesn't hurt to have world class genetics and start before the age of 5. His father was a world class vaulter and either had or was close to the national high school record in the mid-late 70's. His mother was a Swedish national team heptathlete.
Dad, Greg Duplantis, set the national HSR two or three times in the spring of 1981. He, Joe Dial (OK) & little-known Texan Dale Jenkins, traded the outdoor HSR that spring. Greg thought he had become the 1st 18 ft hser in winning a meet against Dial at Colorado Springs that summer. Upon re-measurement, it measured at 17'11 3/4". He later went on to clear 19' 1/4" several times in his career. I had the pleasure of watching him compete at the '88 Olympic Trials in Indy. At 5'5" tall, Greg was exceptionally quick & rocked back on the pole more explosively than I've ever seen anyone do. Mondo got his speed from his Dad.

Joe Dial went on to become the 1st hs athlete over 18 ft with his 18' 1/4" & 18' 1 1/4" vaults at two all-comers meets in August of 1981.
 
I got a little of it right. A little later than I remember it but that is normal for me. I thought it was in my first few years of coaching but I am wrong.

I did not realize Greg was so small. I see who must be Greg in the TV coverage and he seems taller.

I also remember the speed and quick rock of Billy Olsen. Am I thinking clearly on his speed, hang, then quick and explosive inversion?
 

JAVMAN83

Well-known member
I got a little of it right. A little later than I remember it but that is normal for me. I thought it was in my first few years of coaching but I am wrong.

I did not realize Greg was so small. I see who must be Greg in the TV coverage and he seems taller.

I also remember the speed and quick rock of Billy Olsen. Am I thinking clearly on his speed, hang, then quick and explosive inversion?
Olson was quick, but average rock back. Terrible take-off ( collapse of left arm), but Olson had an ideal frame, like Mondo, & Olson had great timing with the momentum of the pole. Unfortunately, he was also not a good vaulter in contrary winds.

I had the great pleasure of meeting Olson, Earl Bell, & Steve Stubblefield (1980 HSR 17' 6") at the 1983 Mason-Dixon Games. Also met Olson's coach, legendary Abilene coach Don Hood. I not only got to meet Dial in 1985, but also drove him to the IUPUI track in Indy in my car at the TAC meet. Great times.

Yes, Greg is the shorter, bearded guy you see Mondo talking with frequently at meets.
 
Thanks for the feedback and great information. I just remember Olson's speed being above average for the event at the time. Those are some legendary names, especially Hood who I heard at clinics more than once.
 

JAVMAN83

Well-known member
As a small follow-up on my meeting Olson at the Mason-Dixon Games...I got to witness him attempting a world record height of 18' 11". He didn't make it that night, but he did become the 3rd man over 19 feet, and the first indoor 19-footer, some 6 days later at the old Toronto Maple Leaf Games.
 
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