Los Angeles Lakers' LeBron James, Kyle Kuzma warned by NBA for violating anti-flopping rule

Yappi

Go Buckeyes
LeBron James and Kyle Kuzma both received warnings for violating the NBA's anti-flopping rule in the Los Angeles Lakers' 115-105 home win over the Memphis Grizzlies on Friday, the league announced.

The NBA said Saturday that James' violation occurred with 2 minutes, 33 seconds remaining in the second quarter when James, positioned between Dillon Brooks and Grayson Allen of the Grizzlies, fell to the floor while vying for a rebound.

Kuzma flopped with 6:31 remaining in the fourth quarter, according to the league. While guarding Brooks, Kuzma tried to draw an offensive foul on the Memphis wing by spinning and tumbling to the hardwood after Brooks put his shoulder down and initiated contact with Kuzma's hip.
 

nwwarrior09

Well-known member
High I.Q. selling job deciding to pull that flop next to a player like Grayson Allen that has a lengthy history of perceived dirty play.

I hate flopping at the pro level even more than I hate what I'd call the "Duke charge" (as made popular and commonplace by Coach K's boys) at the high school and college level where a help defender more often than not is rewarded with a charge call for sliding into the path of a driver and often undercutting an airborne driver at the rim, as opposed to actually be dislodged from an already set spot by a driver. That said, until better officiating eradicates the behavior, both are smart basketball plays as they are often favorably rewarded.

As a side note, I didn't realize the NBA had initiated this rule all the way back in 2012. They've done a poor job in executing it to clean up this form of gamesmanship.
 
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thavoice

Well-known member
High I.Q. selling job deciding to pull that flop next to a player like Grayson Allen that has a lengthy history of perceived dirty play.

I hate flopping at the pro level even more than I hate what I'd call the "Duke charge" (as made popular and commonplace by Coach K's boys) at the high school and college level where a help defender more often than not is rewarded with a charge call for sliding into the path of a driver and often undercutting an airborne driver at the rim, as opposed to actually be dislodged from an already set spot by a driver. That said, until better officiating eradicates the behavior, both are smart basketball plays as they are often favorably rewarded.

As a side note, I didn't realize the NBA had initiated this rule all the way back in 2012. They've done a poor job in executing it to clean up this form of gamesmanship.
I see a lot of questionable.charge calls in HS.
 

nwwarrior09

Well-known member
I see a lot of questionable.charge calls in HS.
It has gotten so much worse in the last few years IMO. I feel like I've seen a few local teams this year that have kids that regularly slide into the path of a driver that's well downhill and proceed to begin falling backwards before any contact is initiated.

I can say the same for seeing kids routinely kicking out (impeding closing out defenders) on jump shots and causing their own contact and/or off-balance falls following shots. Another form of gamesmanship that is rewarded all too often.
 
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