Is addiction a real thing?

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Yes it's real.

I'm addicted to selected women (HWP); and there is no way I'm ever going to rehab!

:>---

1969 Shelby GT350
 
It might be the only disease created by the person. You absolutely positively cannot get addicted to something you don't do. If you accept addiction as disease you are opening a whole new can of worms.

You can't feel sorry for everyone.
 
:laugh: recently

vary, vary wobbly

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/condition

"Death due to disease is called death by natural causes." Would this apply to the needle PSH jammed in his arm?

I wonder if the concept/definition of addiction as disease originated in a marketing department, or a lobbyist's office ?

The nomenclature is about two things- an attempt at the removal of social stigma, and getting paid. Both may encourage people to get help, so I guess the end result is good.
 
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This is a subject that I have done a complete reversal on.

In the past I was of the opinion (not an educated opinion) that addiction was a term used to explain why people made bad decision of bad decision in their life.

Then a family member (someone that I was close to) became addicted to Alcohol at a very young age. By the time this person graduated from high school he had all but destroyed his future. He had been arrested and or hospitalized several times and lost most if not all of his friends. Following high school it was more of the same for a few years finally he developed serious alcohol related health issues and ultimately died at a very young age.

I often wonder why most people can drink alcohol and there is not an immediate hook when others can try it once and have an immediate insatiable desire for more. The desire consumes that person even though they experience several life altering events that should sober them up.

Making a bad decision to try something once is something most of us have or will undertake. However once tried I believe some have a predisposition to addiction. I agree with those that say you can't become addicted if you never try something but that does not explain why some can try something without becoming addicted and others can't.
 
Get that totally logical nonsense out of here. It's so much easier to judge without knowing and pretend that everyone is the exact same!
 
Sure I believe there's such a thing as addiction and that it can be unpredictable. I remember a kid in the dorm, had never had alcohol (he said). About as instant an addict as I've ever seen. And he was an annoying drunk to boot. He's still responsible for his actions.
 
It's so much easier to judge without knowing and pretend that everyone is the exact same!

Please direct us to any post in this thread, or your previous thread, that fits this description. I can't think of one, other than several of us "judging" that it is incredibly stupid for anyone to have started using heroin after about 1970.
 
It might be the only disease created by the person. You absolutely positively cannot get addicted to something you don't do. If you accept addiction as disease you are opening a whole new can of worms.

You can't feel sorry for everyone.

In most cases. There have been instances of druggings (accidental or not) which led to addiction through no fault of the person involved.
 
"Addiction" is an excuse for mental weakness and a lack of will power.

There you go recently, now you have someone to go after lol.
 
So recently thinks if people say it's a disease it means people aren't responsible for the choices that led them there or their compliance in overcoming the disease.
 
Addiction is clearly real but it's not a disease.

I agree. I believe addiction is a condition that has a symbiotic relationship with a form(s) of mental illness. Some have a greater predisposition to addiction, whether by virtue of emotional condition, brain chemistry, or both. There are some substances that are addictive to all, like heroin, but some people are better equipped to resist than others, for a multitude of reasons.
 
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