Iconic concerts attended.

Qcity

Well-known member
How did you like the hash?
LOL

We drove up in a motor home; a lot of babes in the parking lot banging on the door wanting to use the bathroom ......got pretty comical. From my vantage point I could see each member of The Stones leave the stage and jump into their own limo and take off; the fans were still going bonkers for an encore ..........they were already gone.
 

Upside

Member
From my vantage point I could see each member of The Stones leave the stage and jump into their own limo and take off;
The guys I was with said the same thing. They tried to point me in the direction but I never saw them exit.

You really should have tried the hash.
 

Auggie

Well-known member
Today is the Anniversary of one of the better later era Grateful Dead shows I attended, 9/4/91 at the old Richfield Coliseum. Bruce Horsnby was sitting in on Piano and the rumor was he called out Jerry for sub par playing at a string of shows in SF a couple weeks before. Garcia cleans up and it lead to one of their better late era tours. Too bad that only lasted for this tour and he was back chasing the dragon the following spring and three years later the rest is history

9/4/91
Richfield Coliseum
Richfield, OH

Set 2
Scarlet Begonias>
Fire On The Mountain
Estimated Prophet>
He's Gone>
Drums>
Space>
China Doll>
The Wheel>
Throwing Stones>
Not Fade Away
E:The Weight

 

HTFF

Well-known member
Rush
Rolling Stones
Rod Stewart
Roxy music
Jackson Browne
Peter frampton
38 special
Marshall Tucker
Pure Prairie League
Bob Seger
Gin Blossoms
Rush.....
Lost track....
 
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Ericles

Member
Yeah, it's sad. It was a great party and lots of fun. Too bad they were greedy and now want way too much money and them telling you who you could have over to your camper was the last straw for me.
How exactly did they regulate who could visit your camper?
 

my2sense

Well-known member
In one day in "Legend Valley" near Zanesville I saw:
Molly Hatchett
Wet Willie
Allman Bros
Marshall Tucker
Hank Jr
Charlie Daniels Band
 

Zunardo

Well-known member
TCM had a Labor Day weekend theme of classic rock band movies, along with classic concert films. I caught the tail end of the Monterey Pop Festival last night. All I saw was 20 minutes of Ravi Shankar noodling unimpressively on a sitar while playing the same chord the entire time, backed up by a bongo player. A camera dolley panned through a divider row in the stands, nothing but sullen young people just staring at the stage. Not a smile to be found among them. Either they weren't Shankar fans, or they were 1967 hipsters. :cool:
 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
TCM had a Labor Day weekend theme of classic rock band movies, along with classic concert films. I caught the tail end of the Monterey Pop Festival last night. All I saw was 20 minutes of Ravi Shankar noodling unimpressively on a sitar while playing the same chord the entire time, backed up by a bongo player. A camera dolley panned through a divider row in the stands, nothing but sullen young people just staring at the stage. Not a smile to be found among them. Either they weren't Shankar fans, or they were 1967 hipsters. :cool:
I never did understand the appeal of Ravi Shankar. Side One of "The Concert for Bangladesh" probably holds the all-time record for the one side of an album LEAST played.
 

EagleGuy

Well-known member
Since there are no live concerts Variety came up with a list of the 50 Best Live Albums of All Time: https://variety.com/lists/best-live-albums-all-time-concerts/

Many rock staples make the list as well as many classic jazz recordings. Not sure Beyoncé is worthy over some notable omissions like Little Feet's Waiting for Columbus or Skynyrd's One More from the Road though...
I read the first page of the comments and this one stood out.

Paul Wolf
September 8, 2020 at 9:30 am
Van Morrison It’s Too Late Too Stop Now yes yes yes. So Many others but, here’s one no one has mentioned, has anyone ever listened to Genesis Live from ’73 with Peter Gabriel? Neil Young and Crazy Horse Rust Never Sleeps?

As one person noted, not a complete list - by far.
 

EagleGuy

Well-known member
TCM had a Labor Day weekend theme of classic rock band movies, along with classic concert films. I caught the tail end of the Monterey Pop Festival last night. All I saw was 20 minutes of Ravi Shankar noodling unimpressively on a sitar while playing the same chord the entire time, backed up by a bongo player. A camera dolley panned through a divider row in the stands, nothing but sullen young people just staring at the stage. Not a smile to be found among them. Either they weren't Shankar fans, or they were 1967 hipsters. :cool:
You didn't miss anything. I was curious about the MPF and tuned into that 75 minute snippet of the festival. Even the Who and Jimi Hendrix cuts were underwhelming. And yes, the Shankar piece was at least twice as long as necessary and struck me as being more about stamina than unique music. (Maybe the long applause at end was due to folks being glad it was finally over.) Janice Joplin (not a fan) had the best (bluesy) act. Seems like they could have come up with better "stuff", but - hey! - it was 50+ years ago. Maybe that had something to do with my disappointment.

On the other hand, now I have seen and now I know. :)
 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
You didn't miss anything. I was curious about the MPF and tuned into that 75 minute snippet of the festival. Even the Who and Jimi Hendrix cuts were underwhelming. And yes, the Shankar piece was at least twice as long as necessary and struck me as being more about stamina than unique music. (Maybe the long applause at end was due to folks being glad it was finally over.) Janice Joplin (not a fan) had the best (bluesy) act. Seems like they could have come up with better "stuff", but - hey! - it was 50+ years ago. Maybe that had something to do with my disappointment.

On the other hand, now I have seen and now I know. :)
Count me as another that tuned in to the MPF and found it underwhelming. The best part was the fan shots and seeing how silly they were all dressed. I guess it was cool back then, but the flowers-in-your-hair, rainbows-on-your-face, barefoot, tie-dye, silly-hats, maxi-skirts, unkempt, hippy look did not hold up well.
 

Auggie

Well-known member
Count me as one that liked many of the performances on MPF. As a kid in the late '70s I thought this music was more authentic than the disco and corporate rock that was dominating the scene in that era. To me The Who, Hendrix, and Joplin all performed with an rough authentic feel that eventually led me to punk and the Grateful Dead as alternatives to Styx and Foreigner. Was it rough around the edges? Yes, but remember that most concerts at that time were run by labels and consisted of 5 artists in matching outfits each playing a couple tunes with a back up band that never left the stage. Heck a 1966 Beatles concert only lasted on average 30 minutes and they were usually set up in the middle of an empty baseball field in a stadium filled with screaming girls. I do agree about Ravi Shankar. Sitars sound really cool as an accent instrument but that Indian music could drone on, especially since many of their crazy time signatures don't translate well to western audiences.
 

EagleGuy

Well-known member
Count me as one that liked many of the performances on MPF. As a kid in the late '70s I thought this music was more authentic than the disco and corporate rock that was dominating the scene in that era. To me The Who, Hendrix, and Joplin all performed with an rough authentic feel that eventually led me to punk and the Grateful Dead as alternatives to Styx and Foreigner. Was it rough around the edges? Yes, but remember that most concerts at that time were run by labels and consisted of 5 artists in matching outfits each playing a couple tunes with a back up band that never left the stage. Heck a 1966 Beatles concert only lasted on average 30 minutes and they were usually set up in the middle of an empty baseball field in a stadium filled with screaming girls. I do agree about Ravi Shankar. Sitars sound really cool as an accent instrument but that Indian music could drone on, especially since many of their crazy time signatures don't translate well to western audiences.
Good points, some of which I thought of after my post. Indulge one more complaint, please: too much Mamas and Papas - especially Cass. :whistle:
 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
Good points, some of which I thought of after my post. Indulge one more complaint, please: too much Mamas and Papas - especially Cass. :whistle:
Just for you, EagleGuy:

John and Mitchy were gettin' kind of itchy
Just to leave the folk music behind
Zal and Denny workin' for a penny
Tryin' to get a fish on the line
In a coffee house Sebastian sat
And after every number they'd pass the hat
McGuinn and McGuire just a gettin' higher
In L.A., you know where that's at
And no one's gettin' fat except Mama Cass

:)
 

EagleGuy

Well-known member
Just for you, EagleGuy:

John and Mitchy were gettin' kind of itchy
Just to leave the folk music behind
Zal and Denny workin' for a penny
Tryin' to get a fish on the line
In a coffee house Sebastian sat
And after every number they'd pass the hat
McGuinn and McGuire just a gettin' higher
In L.A., you know where that's at
And no one's gettin' fat except Mama Cass

:)
My first reaction was you sob. :mad: Then, I saw the last line, which was definitely going through my mind. Michelle was easy on the eye, though.
 

Upside

Member
Never got to an Alice Cooper concert. My life will never be complete.
I've seen him a handful of times with the first being in the mid-70's. That was some edgy stuff with a real dark side. The last three times were still great since he is a consummate showman. Nowadays it's got almost a vaudeville vibe to it. Orianthi was the first female guitarist I saw play for him followed by Nita Strauss. Both were amazing but I thought Strauss could absolutely shred.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I've seen him a handful of times with the first being in the mid-70's. That was some edgy stuff with a real dark side. The last three times were still great since he is a consummate showman. Nowadays it's got almost a vaudeville vibe to it. Orianthi was the first female guitarist I saw play for him followed by Nita Strauss. Both were amazing but I thought Strauss could absolutely shred.
venue?
 

Auggie

Well-known member
Good points, some of which I thought of after my post. Indulge one more complaint, please: too much Mamas and Papas - especially Cass. :whistle:
Agree on this point.

The reason that the Mamas & the Papas got so much time is that Papa John Philips and their Manager Lou Adler put this thing together and they are the ones that decided to film it and had final say in performances for the D.A. Pennebaker film. Outside of Ravi Shankar, go figure, none of the bands were paid to perform at MPF; Papa John thought the music should be free in the spirit of the times. (Ticket price in theory was to cover the cost of operations of the event but there is much debate to this point.) The $s were going to come from the film and and the shyster Lou Adler waited until the bands were ready to go on stage to get them to sign a contract giving them rights to film their set. The Grateful Dead saw right through this scam and would not sign a contract quickly, that is why they are not featured in the film. The Mamas & the Papas closed the show and had to follow the famous final session that went Buffalo Springfield, The Who, Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, & Mamas & the Papas with Scott McKenzie. The Mamas & the Papas were actually a great studio act with killer 4 part harmonies backed by the Wrecking Crew, live only Cass Elliot had the musical chops to keep up with that kind of powerhouse line up.
 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
I remember hearing that Simon and Garfunkel were pretty upset with their showing at the MPF. They felt their music was dated and behind the times compared to the new psychedelic and "heavy" bands that were becoming popular at the time. The fans politely clapped for them, but many fans were there to see the heavier acts like Jimi, Janis, The Who and The Dead. And Ravi Shankar (just kidding).
 

Auggie

Well-known member
Ravi Shankar actually got an entire afternoon session to himself, four hours! Probably one of the 1st instances of forced woke culture. This was billed as his US debut and much hype surrounded the performance. Could you imagine listening to 4 hours of basically groaning music in 11/12 time signature? No wonder why the audience appeared the way they did on the film. Only session that did not sell out.
 

BlackHawk

Well-known member
It just dawned on me how many members of the infamous "27 Club" were at The Monterey Pop Festival:

1. Brian Jones, one of the founders of The Rolling Stones. Did not play at the MPF, but appeared on the stage to introduce Hendrix. Died in 1969. Per coroner, "death by misadventure".
2. Alan "Blind Owl" Wilson. He's the super-nerdy dude, with coke-bottle glasses, playing slide guitar for Canned Heat. Died 9/3/70 from barbiturate drug overdose (possible suicide).
3. Jimi Hendrix. Died 15 days after Wilson. Barbiturate-related asphyxia.
4. Janis Joplin. Died 16 days after Hendrix. Probable heroin overdose.
5. Ron "Pigpen" McKernan, The Grateful Dead. Died in 1973. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage associated with alcoholism.

Must have been something in the water that day....or in the brown acid. Don't ever take the brown acid!
 

said_aouita

Well-known member
Country -
John Michael Montgomery
Hank Jr.
Alabama

Rock -
Ozzfest 1997, when Ozzy lost his voice and people rioted at Polaris.
Ozzfest 2001 Polaris
Lollapalooza 1997 Polaris - Lineup:
Snoop Doggy Dogg
Tool
Eels
The Prodigy
James
Tricky
Korn
Julian & Damian Marley


Butthole Surfers- Bogart's in Cincinnati 1996
The Cure - Nutter Center 1992
Pantera - Mesa, Az 1997
Guns and Roses (opening band Soundgarden) Nutter Center 1992
Kiss - Nutter Center 1996
Tool - Cincinnati 2019

A handful of other smaller shows...
 
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Upside

Member
The first time was at the Toledo Sports Arena in 1971, crappy venue that had great shows. The firecracker incident was two years later at the Sports Arena but I was not in attendance. The next time was at the Richfield Coliseum in 1978. After that the Stranahan Theater (Toledo), State Theater (Sandusky), and twice at the Lima Civic Center.
 

SLS

Member
Jimi Hendrix March 27,1968, Muncie Indiana Fairgrounds. Tickets were sold out, but I could hear it loud and clear from outside the building. I got there late, hoping to sneak in., but was unsuccessful.The crowd was yelling for "Purple Haze", and Jimi was yelling back "F--- you!" According to the set list for that concert, it was the first song of the concert. Got this picture online somewhere.

1599836290502.png

Newport Rhode Island Jazz Festival 1969, Blood Sweat and Tears, Sly Stone and others. Missed Led Zeppelin and James Brown to get back to my summer job packing kosher chickens in n Willimantic ,Conn.

We had two tickets to Woodstock, but couldn't afford the time off from work. One of my great regrets in this life.

Willie Nelson at Riverfront Coliseum in late seventies. The air was quite dense.
Waylon Jennings and Emmylou Harris at Univ of Cin in 1980
Marty Robbins Taft Theater, Cin. Had a brief stint as an usher there and got in a few free concerts.

Lots of bluegrass icons over the years, including two late greats, Dr. Ralph Stanley and John Duffey. Got to shake Ralph's hand.

Doug Kershaw, the Ragin' Cajun' in beautiful downtown Hamilton, Ohio in the middle 90's, also the Drifters.
 
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