Great News for a Mars Colony!


Europa Clipper’s main science goal is to determine whether there are places below the surface of Jupiter’s icy moon, Europa, that could support life. The mission’s three main science objectives are to determine the thickness of the moon’s icy shell and its surface interactions with the ocean below, to investigate its composition, and to characterize its geology. The mission’s detailed exploration of Europa will help scientists better understand the astrobiological potential for habitable worlds beyond our planet.

Managed by Caltech in Pasadena, California, JPL leads the development of the Europa Clipper mission in partnership with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. APL designed the main spacecraft body in collaboration with JPL and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The Planetary Missions Program Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, executes program management of the Europa Clipper mission.
 

Europa Clipper’s main science goal is to determine whether there are places below the surface of Jupiter’s icy moon, Europa, that could support life. The mission’s three main science objectives are to determine the thickness of the moon’s icy shell and its surface interactions with the ocean below, to investigate its composition, and to characterize its geology. The mission’s detailed exploration of Europa will help scientists better understand the astrobiological potential for habitable worlds beyond our planet.

Managed by Caltech in Pasadena, California, JPL leads the development of the Europa Clipper mission in partnership with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. APL designed the main spacecraft body in collaboration with JPL and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The Planetary Missions Program Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, executes program management of the Europa Clipper mission.
Over the years, we have really broadened our thinking of where life may exist. Extremophiles have been found in places and conditions that were previously thought to be unsuitable for life.

Science continues to march ahead and have more questions than answers.
 
Someone needs to tell these guys that "close" is a relative thing:

Let's see if I get this right. The black hole is 33 times more massive than the sun and therefore has much more gravitational pull, but is 590 parsecs away. The sun is 93 million miles from Earth. One parsec equals 3.26 light years or 19.2 trillion miles, so 590 parsecs equal 11,328 trillion miles (11.328 quadrillion miles). That means that the black hole is over 120,000,000 times further from Earth than El Sol. I think we should be safe for now.
 
It's not outer space or Mars but this is a big deal!


And sorry Dr Bioethisist but if you're on deaths bed you're exactly the right patient for this type of procedure.

Despite these hopeful signs, L. Syd Johnson, a bioethicist at SUNY Upstate Medical University, cautions that xenotransplantation is still experimental and worries about the medical industry exploiting "desperate patients who have no other options."

More here:

 
It's amazing how much we don't know about our own solar system. Then you realize there are another 250,000,000,000 star systems in our galaxy alone. Then, multiply that by an additional 200 billion to 2 trillion other galaxies in our known universe, many that have well over a trillion stars. Then, factor in that we may be one of many universes. These are incomprehensible numbers that no human can grasp.
 

A research team using the ChemCam instrument onboard NASA’s Curiosity rover discovered higher-than-usual amounts of manganese in lakebed rocks within Gale Crater on Mars, which indicates that the sediments were formed in a river, delta, or near the shoreline of an ancient lake. The results were published on May 1 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

“It is difficult for manganese oxide to form on the surface of Mars, so we didn’t expect to find it in such high concentrations in a shoreline deposit,” said Patrick Gasda, of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Space Science and Applications group and lead author on the study. “On Earth, these types of deposits happen all the time because of the high oxygen in our atmosphere produced by photosynthetic life, and from microbes that help catalyze those manganese oxidation reactions.
 
Much respect and praise to Elon Musk and all the big thinkers on his team. The tremendous hurdles, huge risks and devastating failure possibilities of space travel haven't stopped him yet. To infinity and beyond!
 
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