Driveline Pitching

HSFan1

New member
I am concerned that non-certified instructors are out there teaching their philosophy with a high probability of hurting pitcher arms/shoulders.
 
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BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
There are high school programs teaching it too. Don't know if they are certified or not. Do know both schools have had pitchers put on the shelf for a majority of the season. Full disclosure, not a fan of Driveline Pitching for physically immature arms.
 

Ty Neal

New member
I am concerned that non-certified instructors are out there teaching their philosophy with a high probability of hurting pitcher arms/shoulders.
You should be concerned and inquisitive. Many youth players are not learning to throw a baseball properly OR are asked to do “forced” movements which creates poor throwing mechanics. The natural progression is the pressure to throw harder. Which leads to weighted balls. End result is a teenager with poor throwing mechanics over loading in a program designed to increase velocity and inevitably an arm injury occurs. Arm strength will happen naturally if in a structured/safe environment only if the throwing mechanics are in place. Thanks for the discussion. - Ty Neal
 
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BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
I am a fan of the weight training, med ball approach. It gets the pitching muscles stronger without strain. Front squats, deadlifts along with a good band workout will help players gets stronger. Coupled with proper pitching mechanics for each pitcher's natural throwing motion, this approach can increase velocity without stressing shoulder and elbow ligament and tendons. Arm acceleration routines with immature arms is asking for trouble.
 
It is like anything else that comes along, we must learn what are the consequences (positive & negative).
If you read the protocols, weighted balls & pull downs are very little part of the program.
Most is prehab and recovery. Now the way they do that might not be your cup of tea and that is fine but just seeing kids "pull down" weighted balls and think that you understand the program is nonsense.
I agree that there are things that need to be prerequisites to undertaking a velo program.
As stated above lifting and having an arm that is conditioned should be part of that.
 

Red14

Well-known member
Past generations we had dad's teaching kids how to pitch, and using common sense always is the best option. Paying a "certified" instruction thousands of dollars a year to have a kid throw a baseball seem out of whack to me. If you can throw hard, you throw hard. There are a select few that can even attain this.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
Past generations we had dad's teaching kids how to pitch, and using common sense always is the best option. Paying a "certified" instruction thousands of dollars a year to have a kid throw a baseball seem out of whack to me. If you can throw hard, you throw hard. There are a select few that can even attain this.
I respectfully disagree with this perspective. I don't know what "certified" means but paying a professional to teach someone the physiological theory behind velocity increases can be well worth the investment. Unless the Dads have some college or pro experience, most dad coaches are tapped out of useful coaching when their kid is 14 or 15. On top of the normal, "I am tired of listening to Dad" stuff that all kids get, a new respected voice can be a helpful to making some headway on increasing velocity. Of course, all players have certain a threshold potential, but professional instructors can be instrumental with that player reaching his or even her (for softball pitching) potential
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
It is like anything else that comes along, we must learn what are the consequences (positive & negative).
If you read the protocols, weighted balls & pull downs are very little part of the program.
Most is prehab and recovery. Now the way they do that might not be your cup of tea and that is fine but just seeing kids "pull down" weighted balls and think that you understand the program is nonsense.
I agree that there are things that need to be prerequisites to undertaking a velo program.
As stated above lifting and having an arm that is conditioned should be part of that.
My feelings about driveline training for immature arms is strictly based on my knowledge of two very well respected high school programs in SWO who have embraced the program. They both have experienced many of their pitchers developing shoulder impingements. Something is not right if that is what is happening.
 

Red14

Well-known member
I respectfully disagree with this perspective. I don't know what "certified" means but paying a professional to teach someone the physiological theory behind velocity increases can be well worth the investment. Unless the Dads have some college or pro experience, most dad coaches are tapped out of useful coaching when their kid is 14 or 15. On top of the normal, "I am tired of listening to Dad" stuff that all kids get, a new respected voice can be a helpful to making some headway on increasing velocity. Of course, all players have certain a threshold potential, but professional instructors can be instrumental with that player reaching his or even her (for softball pitching) potential
There is no doubt that "some" select players can gain advantages with this training. My real life experiences tell me that out of 10 kids who do this, 9 are wasting their time and parents money. Youth sports is a multi-million dollar industry made up of parents who over estimate their kids athletic prowless. 98% of youth athletes are typical kids who may be a high school athlete and only a very, very select few can attain any type of scholarship. Now that's not saying they can't play in college, but remember that outside of a few D1 sports, most are partial or no scholarship. Very few D1 college baseball programs offer more than a handful of full ride baseball scholarships.
 

Peak

Member
My feelings about driveline training for immature arms is strictly based on my knowledge of two very well respected high school programs in SWO who have embraced the program. They both have experienced many of their pitchers developing shoulder impingements. Something is not right if that is what is happening.
I agree with the immature arms not doing this type of program. Driveline also notices this, and offers a different program for players under 13 on their site. I think what you may be seeing are when coaches think they know better than most and try to use a system they are not prepared to teach, or disregard and push on to their players. Younger kids will do just about anything their coaches tell them to do without hesitation. I've noticed that with my son's team.
As Baseballfan20 mentioned, the program itself is mainly band work and excercises. Very little time is spent throwing weighted balls. It is more conditioning. But if the coaches are not trained/certified, or don't have a proper understanding of when/how to use the program, it will result in injuries. If kids are having shoulder problems, I would look at the coaches first to see what/how they are using this program.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
There is no doubt that "some" select players can gain advantages with this training. My real life experiences tell me that out of 10 kids who do this, 9 are wasting their time and parents money. Youth sports is a multi-million dollar industry made up of parents who over estimate their kids athletic prowless. 98% of youth athletes are typical kids who may be a high school athlete and only a very, very select few can attain any type of scholarship. Now that's not saying they can't play in college, but remember that outside of a few D1 sports, most are partial or no scholarship. Very few D1 college baseball programs offer more than a handful of full ride baseball scholarships.
My kid is in a JUCO situation that is very cheap and has maximum options. I will let you know how it goes.
 

BASESWIMPARENT

Well-known member
I agree with the immature arms not doing this type of program. Driveline also notices this, and offers a different program for players under 13 on their site. I think what you may be seeing are when coaches think they know better than most and try to use a system they are not prepared to teach, or disregard and push on to their players. Younger kids will do just about anything their coaches tell them to do without hesitation. I've noticed that with my son's team.
As Baseballfan20 mentioned, the program itself is mainly band work and excercises. Very little time is spent throwing weighted balls. It is more conditioning. But if the coaches are not trained/certified, or don't have a proper understanding of when/how to use the program, it will result in injuries. If kids are having shoulder problems, I would look at the coaches first to see what/how they are using this program.
The program that my kid follows is based on the Top Velocity program. They are starting to bring in some of the driveline drills with the arm acceleration portion. I am interested to see how both programs merge and diverge.
 
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