How are politics affecting HS sports?

Redandgold

Well-known member
You don't see kneeling in a non violent protest as creating poor race relations on the part of how whites view blacks?

Speaking just on a personal level, I find kneeling during our anthem to be a serious and offensive statement. As an employer I will go out of my way to help any individual who earnestly wants to make a better life but needs opportunity or education to accomplish that goal. I will not help those who are bitter against the past and believe I owe them an opportunity.

Would it not be better for all involved if we as a nation turned the page on past wrongs rather than continuing to make a public statement in front of people about how bad our country was in the past? Most every person alive today had little to nothing to do with the past prior to 1970, but we all can attempt to positively move forward.

When such outward statements reach high school sports, I will not support those teams that express themselves in such a non verbal manner.
I understand your position, but it denies the lingering racism of today. Racial profiling for example. I have a friend who tried to rent an apartment in a building in Centerville for months and he was always told there we’re no vacancies, only to later see others moving in and out. He’s black. He had his lawyer send them a letter and “something opened up” within a week. Black teenagers get followed around department stores by employees almost immediately after entering. Profiling by the police. These things still occur.
 

thisisinsane

Well-known member
I understand your position, but it denies the lingering racism of today. Racial profiling for example. I have a friend who has tried to rent an apartment in a building in Centerville for months and he’s always told there are no vacancies, only to later see others moving in and out. He’s black. He had his lawyer send them a letter and “something opened up” within a week. Black teenagers get followed around department stores by employees almost immediately after entering. Profiling by the police. These things still occur.
Sure, there is a median somewhere there too. Chicken or egg argument… did racists cause the profiling or did the crimes cause the profiling?
 

thisisinsane

Well-known member
I understand your position, but it denies the lingering racism of today. Racial profiling for example. I have a friend who tried to rent an apartment in a building in Centerville for months and he was always told there we’re no vacancies, only to later see others moving in and out. He’s black. He had his lawyer send them a letter and “something opened up” within a week. Black teenagers get followed around department stores by employees almost immediately after entering. Profiling by the police. These things still occur.
Plus, are you suggesting that the “protesting/kneeling” has helped improve racial relations?
 

zeeman

Well-known member
First, I’m not talking about Kap. Never brought him up. This was about high school kids. That said, why would Kap or any other person kneeling impact race relations if this was really about the kneeling? I don’t care if they are black, half black, or white. His post makes it clear that while he claims it‘s about kneeling, what he really is pissed about is why they are doing it. If it was not about that, race relations would never be part of the conversation
Just providing with with info when you said what if a white kid kneeled
 

ProV1

Well-known member
Plus, are you suggesting that the “protesting/kneeling” has helped improve racial relations?
Undoubtedly the kneeling protests have raised the countries awareness of the issue. In terms of improving race relations, I am not sure. I would guess that it has for some like the white teammates of those athletes. On the other side, you do have a bunch of angry old white guys who don’t want to hear about it problems that face black folk and get all pissed off. I suppose if you frequent those circles, you find it divisive.
 

zeeman

Well-known member
First I’m white , in my 70s and had a father who flew bombers in WWII, was shot down ,had members of his crew killed and spent time in a POW camp. He is rolling over in his grave. Today’s Rs/conservatives are off the charts. Looking to pick a fight everywhere. Many in here identify as those who stormed the Capital back in January - have mental issues, are pariahs in their own communities, have failures in their lives that they blame on others and are at best Neanderthals dying out as they never grew with the developing society. Outraged that a black man got elected Prez. Upset that black people still protest the continuing racism practiced against them. Nationalism in all its ugly ,disgusting ways. But wanting to profess their “grievances” as the dominate pampered segment of society that doesn’t want to “get along”.
Scream GIF by Originals
 

zeeman

Well-known member
I understand your position, but it denies the lingering racism of today. Racial profiling for example. I have a friend who tried to rent an apartment in a building in Centerville for months and he was always told there we’re no vacancies, only to later see others moving in and out. He’s black. He had his lawyer send them a letter and “something opened up” within a week. Black teenagers get followed around department stores by employees almost immediately after entering. Profiling by the police. These things still occur.
Then black people should stop stealing and being bad tenants 🤷‍♀️
 

thisisinsane

Well-known member
Undoubtedly the kneeling protests have raised the countries awareness of the issue. In terms of improving race relations, I am not sure. I would guess that it has for some like the white teammates of those athletes. On the other side, you do have a bunch of angry old white guys who don’t want to hear about it problems that face black folk and get all pissed off. I suppose if you frequent those circles, you find it divisive.
You’re talking how, in your view, maybe the privileged white pro athletes have improved their relationships with the privileged black athletes? One hell of a take. Those are the people I was worried about. How has kneeling helped improve race relations among real people with real problems? You know, like the black guy in Akron that is ACTUALLY worried about getting shot walking to his car? Not LeBron feeling unsafe getting in his Ferrari.
 

nutsnbolts

Well-known member
Ok, we live in a democracy that preaches freedom, liberty, and justice for all. A lot of people don’t believe our country protects that for African Americans. Taking a knee is a form of freedom of speech utilized to protest this belief. It is obviously a non violent symbolic protest. When it comes to race in America we could have, should have done better. We lived in a country where racism was legal from the early 17th century until the 1970’s, over 350 years. The ill feeling created by our history is not going to go away overnight, especially without everyone really working at it. Many believe it is healthy to protest obvious injustices nonviolently.
If I equate kneeling during the national anthem with using the n-word.
Am I allowed that statement as freedom of speech?
Is the n-word accepted as freedom of speech?

Just because some idiots have no moral filter doesn't mean their actions (or speech) should be automatically accepted.
 

OldSoulon

Well-known member
First I’m white , in my 70s and had a father who flew bombers in WWII, was shot down ,had members of his crew killed and spent time in a POW camp. He is rolling over in his grave. Today’s Rs/conservatives are off the charts. Looking to pick a fight everywhere. Many in here identify as those who stormed the Capital back in January - have mental issues, are pariahs in their own communities, have failures in their lives that they blame on others and are at best Neanderthals dying out as they never grew with the developing society. Outraged that a black man got elected Prez. Upset that black people still protest the continuing racism practiced against them. Nationalism in all its ugly ,disgusting ways. But wanting to profess their “grievances” as the dominate pampered segment of society that doesn’t want to “get along”.
Those that kneel during the anthem think your Dad was a racist, because he's older, and he's white.
 

Paladin

Well-known member
Those that kneel during the anthem think your Dad was a racist, because he's older, and he's white.

I figured a racist like yourself would say that. Dad was not a racist and , no, many blacks don’t believe all older , white people are racist. He wouldn’t give your comment any serious consideration. But they have glowing examples like you to look at. My Dad died in the 80s, so he saw the continuing racism at work.
 

ProV1

Well-known member
You’re talking how, in your view, maybe the privileged white pro athletes have improved their relationships with the privileged black athletes? One hell of a take. Those are the people I was worried about. How has kneeling helped improve race relations among real people with real problems? You know, like the black guy in Akron that is ACTUALLY worried about getting shot walking to his car? Not LeBron feeling unsafe getting in his Ferrari.
First, I don’t consider athletes privileged. Most come from modest to poor backgrounds and they earned their way to a better life. I consider people who are born into wealth as privileged.

I will broaden the sphere. I think the awareness has helped relations with more than just athletes. I do think there are segments of our population that better identify with racial injustice because of education and conversations that were enabled by the visibility from the protests. Of course, if you are in a demographic that does not believe there is racial injustice, then the protests might piss you off and make you hate blacks even more.
 

OldSoulon

Well-known member
I figured a racist like yourself would say that. Dad was not a racist and , no, many blacks don’t believe all older , white people are racist. He wouldn’t give your comment any serious consideration. But they have glowing examples like you to look at. My Dad died in the 80s, so he saw the continuing racism at work.
I'm sure he wasn't. He was a fine American that served his country.

What I'm saying is he would be judged by his age and race as a racist by most of those that kneel during the anthem.
 

OldSoulon

Well-known member
First, I don’t consider athletes privileged. Most come from modest to poor backgrounds and they earned their way to a better life. I consider people who are born into wealth as privileged.

I will broaden the sphere. I think the awareness has helped relations with more than just athletes. I do think there are segments of our population that better identify with racial injustice because of education and conversations that were enabled by the visibility from the protests. Of course, if you are in a demographic that does not believe there is racial injustice, then the protests might piss you off and make you hate blacks even more.
I've met several ex NFL players, some Hall of Famers. Nice guys. They don't lift a finger for anything at social gatherings.

That's because for years they had everything done for them.
 

NewOldBlood

Well-known member
First I’m white , in my 70s and had a father who flew bombers in WWII, was shot down ,had members of his crew killed and spent time in a POW camp. He is rolling over in his grave. Today’s Rs/conservatives are off the charts. Looking to pick a fight everywhere. Many in here identify as those who stormed the Capital back in January - have mental issues, are pariahs in their own communities, have failures in their lives that they blame on others and are at best Neanderthals dying out as they never grew with the developing society. Outraged that a black man got elected Prez. Upset that black people still protest the continuing racism practiced against them. Nationalism in all its ugly ,disgusting ways. But wanting to profess their “grievances” as the dominate pampered segment of society that doesn’t want to “get along”.
If you believe that "Rs/conservatives" are the only one's in today's political climate that "are off the charts", you sir, are part of the problem within today's political climate. There is plenty of bat sht crazy on both sides to go around.
 

thisisinsane

Well-known member
First, I don’t consider athletes privileged. Most come from modest to poor backgrounds and they earned their way to a better life. I consider people who are born into wealth as privileged.
That’s because you’re racist. You only play identity politics, which is for the feeble- minded who wish to stay comfortable and safe. What sport are you talking about? “Most” come from modest to poor backgrounds? Where is your evidence in that? Hockey is a pretty expensive sport. So is Polo. Are the Williams sisters privileged in your opinion? How about Tom Brady? What about Ohtani? I’m pretty sure Lonzo, LaMelo, and LiAngelo were pretty underprivileged… Herbstreits kids? No privilege. Aaron Rodgers? Christian McCaffrey? Ezekiel Elliot? Lamar Jackson? Is it positional? Sport related? Or skin color related?


Dunce
 

ProV1

Well-known member
That’s because you’re racist. You only play identity politics, which is for the feeble- minded who wish to stay comfortable and safe. What sport are you talking about? “Most” come from modest to poor backgrounds? Where is your evidence in that? Hockey is a pretty expensive sport. So is Polo. Are the Williams sisters privileged in your opinion? How about Tom Brady? What about Ohtani? I’m pretty sure Lonzo, LaMelo, and LiAngelo were pretty underprivileged… Herbstreits kids? No privilege. Aaron Rodgers? Christian McCaffrey? Ezekiel Elliot? Lamar Jackson? Is it positional? Sport related? Or skin color related?


Dunce
Are we comparing polo to the NFL now? What an idiot. I think it pretty obvious that if we look at the average social economic status for athletes prior to getting into professional leagues, it is not privileged. You are an idiot to assert otherwise.
 

thisisinsane

Well-known member
Are we comparing polo to the NFL now? What an idiot. I think it pretty obvious that if we look at the average social economic status for athletes prior to getting into professional leagues, it is not privileged. You are an idiot to assert otherwise.
I’m wrapping my head around this whole “privilege” thing. I’m getting it, one can only be born into privilege.

You said “athletes”, do you not consider Polo a sport? You also glossed over all the contradictory examples I gave, starting with hockey.
 

Paladin

Well-known member
If you believe that "Rs/conservatives" are the only one's in today's political climate that "are off the charts", you sir, are part of the problem within today's political climate. There is plenty of bat sht crazy on both sides to go around.

another utter fool. Today’s R/conservative is at war with

liberal Ds
Moderate Ds
Conservative Ds
Liberal independents
Moderate indies
Conservative indies
Liberal Rs
Moderate Rs
Conservative Rs ( these are rinos according to today’s extreme idiots)

No, sir. YOU are the problem. Whacked out, at war and creating a world of problems FOR EVERYONE ELSE.
 
Last edited:

ProV1

Well-known member
I’m wrapping my head around this whole “privilege” thing. I’m getting it, one can only be born into privilege.

You said “athletes”, do you not consider Polo a sport? You also glossed over all the contradictory examples I gave, starting with hockey.
There is obvious context to every discussion and to think polo fits this conversation is nothing but sophistry.

I do believe that privilege largely comes from being granted something rather than actually earning it. I believe athletes like most earned occupations are not privileged. I will acknowledge that if you intertwine privilege with things like wealth regardless of how they are achieved, then you would conflate those things. I do not conflate wealth or status with privilege unless it is purely granted.
 

D4fan

Well-known member
I said this a couple years ago when all this started.

Go to a game where one of the participating teams has a high Mennonite population. Take a quick glance at the crowd during the anthem. Chances are you will see at least one family sitting in their seats. They will otherwise be respectful...they won't be carrying on a conversation or otherwise calling attention to themselves. But, they won't be standing; they won't be facing the flag; they won't have their hands on their hearts; they won't be singing. They do this because they see this ritual as a form of idol worship and they refuse to participate in it.

So, if you disagree with the kneeler, I ask you: Do you support this family's right to sit?
Mennonites are part of the Annabaptist movement that emerged primarily from Switzerland and then the German Palatinate region. One strong point if emphasis is on seperate kingdoms, God's kingdom vs the earthly (national) kingdoms. In the Bible when Peter pulled his sword out and cut off the ear of Malchus, Jesus said to put the sword away and "my kingdom is not of this world, if it was my servants would fight to protect it"

This is important to a couple posts I see on here, 1- it gives you the reason why Mennonites may remain seated during the anthem, it's not a protest, it's because they are not part of this worlds kingdom. The Mennonites that feel this strongly likely do not vote or involve themselves in any work associated with the promotion of government or its protection from enemies. 2- that leads me to the question of service during times of draft for war. Generally (the confederacy did not allow conscientious objector status in general) , when Mennonites, Amish and some Brethren groups have been drafted and the present themselves as conscientious objectors to participating in the war effort, they are assigned to work in hospitals, farms or similar to serve out their time. Sometimes they have been assigned non weapons carrying jobs on the battlefield. I knew one guy who was a friend if my dad's, who was assigned fuel duty on a small island in the Pacific. Turns out he fuelled up the plane carrying one of the two bomb's dropped on Japan. So much for not being a part of the war effort but I digress.
 

D4fan

Well-known member
I understand your position, but it denies the lingering racism of today. Racial profiling for example. I have a friend who tried to rent an apartment in a building in Centerville for months and he was always told there we’re no vacancies, only to later see others moving in and out. He’s black. He had his lawyer send them a letter and “something opened up” within a week. Black teenagers get followed around department stores by employees almost immediately after entering. Profiling by the police. These things still occur.
So what's the solution to "lingering racism"?

There is most always a financial reason for a business to "red line" an area. Business likes green no matter what color the client.

I just don't buy the idea we make racism less common by offending people. The way to solve one issue is not to create another. Will people who improperly view those of a different race be moved to acceptance of them by their offensive actions? While that would be an easy way to solve a big problem, part of me says that may actually make things worse.
 

winbypin

Well-known member
I understand your position, but it denies the lingering racism of today. Racial profiling for example. I have a friend who tried to rent an apartment in a building in Centerville for months and he was always told there we’re no vacancies, only to later see others moving in and out. He’s black. He had his lawyer send them a letter and “something opened up” within a week. Black teenagers get followed around department stores by employees almost immediately after entering. Profiling by the police. These things still occur.
Sweet. The "black friend" anecdotal story.

I have several black friends and they were able to rent apartments, no problem.

My story wins.
 

D4fan

Well-known member
What if a white guy kneeled? Does that cause poor race relations among whites?

You just said the part you were supposed to keep quiet out load? Your issue is not with the kneeling, you just don’t respect or acknowledge what they are protesting. My guess is that if a white kid took a knee to protest the loss of his veteran Dad in a war he did not believe in, you would not be posting about that on Yappi.

Of course you will never admit that but it is already written all over your post.
If a white guy knelt because he wanted to put down my country I would feel the exact same as I do when a black guy kneels to put down my country.

Your right, my issue is not with the kneeling, it's with the attitude behind the kneeling irrespective of color.
 

ProV1

Well-known member
So what's the solution to "lingering racism"?

There is most always a financial reason for a business to "red line" an area. Business likes green no matter what color the client.

I just don't buy the idea we make racism less common by offending people. The way to solve one issue is not to create another. Will people who improperly view those of a different race be moved to acceptance of them by their offensive actions? While that would be an easy way to solve a big problem, part of me says that may actually make things worse.

It is impossible for a person’s actions to “offend“ another person. One can not project a reaction to another person. You choose to be offended. It is a reaction that you control. It would be a horrible way to live your life trying to avoid any action that could cause nut jobs to be offended.
 

ProV1

Well-known member
If a white guy knelt because he wanted to put down my country I would feel the exact same as I do when a black guy kneels to put down my country.

Your right, my issue is not with the kneeling, it's with the attitude behind the kneeling irrespective of color.
Black people are not kneeling to put down the country. They are kneeling in protest of people who are racist and the sub culture that is created by it.
 
.
Top