State budget includes law requiring cash sales

Kind of like arguing semantics but there is a minor difference between a state college or university and public college or university. Similarly not all private schools are non-profit institutions, some are for profit. A college or university can be public institution but not a state institution, they generally go hand in hand but it isn't the case 100% of the time.
By an act of the Ohio Legislature, the University of Cincinnati became a state institution in 1977.
 
Kind of like arguing semantics but there is a minor difference between a state college or university and public college or university. Similarly not all private schools are non-profit institutions, some are for profit. A college or university can be public institution but not a state institution, they generally go hand in hand but it isn't the case 100% of the time.
i’m gonna take a guess the original context and intent of “Are they going to require all state schools to accept cash like Ohio State, Cincinnati, the MAC schools?” was in reference to the fact those schools are members of an actual body that does have a general (albeit vague) relationship to the state government … enough of which would qualify for the common parlance of “state school” … and was not instead an attempt to say they’re state schools in the same technical sense that uAlbany, uBuffalo etc are (within systems such as the SUNY)
 
As an Assistant AD who does mostly game management we offer both digital and paper tickets. We don't advertise that we offer paper tickets, let's just call it our "secret menu". In other words if you ask about it we offer it, if you don't ask we don't tell.

a.) digital tickets are more efficient, yes. I don't have to make a late night run to the bank to do the night deposit, we don't have to take as much time on a late Friday night doing the paper money count in a back room somewhere in the building. If done correctly it can expedite the process for getting people into the stadium. I got news for everyone, these things called Smart Phones ain't going away. This thing called the internet seems to have caught on to society. Paper tickets should be offered IMPO as an option but I find it funny that people are still pushing back against online ticket sales, especially when you consider that much of life is now and has been online. I know people in their 70s who have social media, do all their shopping on amazon but buy a ticket to a high school football game online!?!?!?!!? GET OFF MY LAWN!!!!! Someone explain this to me as I simply don't get it.

b.) I can't speak for every district but if my school wants new uniforms, to be able to turn on the lights, mow the fields, etc... then we need to sell tickets. My boss (our AD), one of his evaluation indicators that he has to discuss every 9 weeks with our principal and district admin is where are we / how are we doing financially. So to say the AD doesn't care about money would essentially get him reprimanded with a letter in his personnel file and then eventually termination if it continues to be a problem. That would be like saying a teacher doesn't care about taking attendance (state mandated btw). We don't have to necessarily be turning a profit but part of those meetings (I've sat in on them) does involve the question "well what are you doing to try to solve this problem?"

c.) Taking cash actually creates less of a paper trail which can lead to some less than positive happenings. When I first started in this business, the AD I first worked under would simply pay ticket takers and other on site personnel by grabbing some cash out of the ticket box and dolling it out to those people who had helped with the athletic contest that evening. Was that a quick and tax free way to pay your employees? Absolutely. Is it the right and legal way to do it? absolutely not. As a public entity we have to have or strive to have 100% transparency when it comes to how we handle the publics money in every way shape and form.


Just some thoughts from those of us on the front lines who actually do deal with this stuff
Not sure if increasing the price of the ticket by 20 to 25% to make the AD's job easier is a good use of the public's money.
 
By an act of the Ohio Legislature, the University of Cincinnati became a state institution in 1977.
There are 19 State Colleges/Universities in Ohio, UC is not technically one by definition. It is however Public. One of the main differences between a "state" school and "public" school is dependent on how the governing power is distributed between boards of regents, board of trustees, presidents, chancellors, provosts, et al. UC is in most other areas probably identical to a state school.
 
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OSU, UC, YSU, CSU and all MAC schools are part of the Ohio University System and governed by the Ohio Department of Higher Education and therefore report to the governor and the Ohio General Assembly
 
Not sure if increasing the price of the ticket by 20 to 25% to make the AD's job easier is a good use of the public's money.
That seems a little...excessive.

In my area it seemed like depending on the app used (HomeTown or TicketSpicket) that it was generally somewhere around .55 to .65 per ticket, or 8% or so of the $7 ticket price.
 
I understand why the cashless system was started due to Covid, but at the end of the day, why make it difficult for people to come to your events? I've never, ever understood this. And I've also never understood how anyone can complain about the cost of a high school event. Most varsity events are between $7-$10. What in the world are you going to do for 2-3 hours that costs you $10 or less. It seems to me even like 25-30 years ago varsity games were $5-$6, so it's really not even kept up with inflation and I'm all for supporting my local high school.

I know the main part for the school is having to staff games, which is a pain and I get that.
 
Schools shouldn't be REQUIRED to provide free feminine hygiene products to female students either...but yet, that's in the budget too.
Are you serious? Wow. I did not know that. You'd think the school would have a vending type machine in the girls bathroom for that.
 
I understand why the cashless system was started due to Covid, but at the end of the day, why make it difficult for people to come to your events? I've never, ever understood this. And I've also never understood how anyone can complain about the cost of a high school event. Most varsity events are between $7-$10. What in the world are you going to do for 2-3 hours that costs you $10 or less. It seems to me even like 25-30 years ago varsity games were $5-$6, so it's really not even kept up with inflation and I'm all for supporting my local high school.

I know the main part for the school is having to staff games, which is a pain and I get that.
why does every pro team use digital-only tickets now? Why does my apartment only take rent online and not by cash, check, or even money order? Because it’s more cost effective for them, and any loss in business/customers isn’t more than what they’ve saved.
 
why does every pro team use digital-only tickets now? Why does my apartment only take rent online and not by cash, check, or even money order? Because it’s more cost effective for them, and any loss in business/customers isn’t more than what they’ve saved.
If you're dealing with 15,000-50,000 fans ok. If you're dealing with 100-200, to make people who are not comfortable using smartphones put their credit card info on a device to me is poor customer service. There were some schools who took a hard line - no cash tickets. Most level headed people just took cash for the 15-20 people who wouldn't attend the game otherwise.
 
Are you serious? Wow. I did not know that. You'd think the school would have a vending type machine in the girls bathroom for that.
Holy cow they've been handing out free lunches for 3 years now. A school lunch is $2.50 and somehow parents can't take care of their own. Meanwhile we have a childhood obesity problem.
 
If you're dealing with 15,000-50,000 fans ok. If you're dealing with 100-200, to make people who are not comfortable using smartphones put their credit card info on a device to me is poor customer service. There were some schools who took a hard line - no cash tickets. Most level headed people just took cash for the 15-20 people who wouldn't attend the game otherwise.
It’s absolutely poor customer service. It’s 100% thinking about the bottom line and nothing else.
 
Just looked back at one game last year. The ticket price was $18 for 3 tickets and a $3.94 processing fee.

IMO, the fee is too high. But at $6 per ticket, that was less than the going rate at most schools that have moved to $7.
 
Not that this discussion really matters to me but, Cincinatti does receive state tax dollars, has a board of trustees appointed by the governor so it is definitely a state university.
 
Just looked back at one game last year. The ticket price was $18 for 3 tickets and a $3.94 processing fee.

IMO, the fee is too high. But at $6 per ticket, that was less than the going rate at most schools that have moved to $7.
That's still a heck of a deal, and even with the processing fee. What are you going to do, for 3 people's admissions for $21? And many people do love the convenience of the virtual ticket, but to mandate it and then stick people with the fee is what sticks it for some. I'm sure in another 20 years we may be using little cash. Heck I see young people buy a drink at Speedway with a debit card. They carry little to no cash, which blows my mind. But think about that, for sites like SeatGeek, Vivid, Ticketmaster, there is fees for tickets of $8-10 per ticket? It's just crazy how these credit card companys just rake in the dough.
I'm sure someone at one of those companys could explain how expensive the software is to do those transactions.
 
I'm sure in another 20 years we may be using little cash. Heck I see young people buy a drink at Speedway with a debit card. They carry little to no cash, which blows my mind.
coin change can be cumbersome to deal with. Unless a person has either a coin purse, or some ball park idea of how much a product costs (+ sales tax) so that they can enter a store with a dollar-and-change amount closest to the nearest tenth (dime) there just isn't a realistic way for people to store coin change on a regular enough basis to where they then put it to use.

a card, by comparison, eliminates the physical hassle and in theory prevents all that squandered change from bill-and-coin/bills based transactions from adding up.
 
How is it convenient to have to go to a website, enter your personal and card information, and list the team you’re there to watch in order to get a ticket? I’d rather throw a tenner on the counter and get a couple bucks back with my ticket.

Now, if schools allowed you to pay at the gate with a card, that would at least be more convenient for the cashless people.
 
I was recently at a board game store in Greenville, South Carolina. I asked the staff about cash versus card sales, and they said cash customers were the old people (like me) and quite a few of the 18-25 crowd. They told me cash is making a comeback among the high school / college crowd.

I still use cash for most of my less than $50 purchases. My wife uses a card for basically anything over $10.
 
My PNC bank no longer has a teller.
Lots of stores no longer need cashiers, So that tells me this digital currency is killing jobs.
Not to mention that a smartphone has kids not wanting to go outside to play, People are texting and driving, Both did more damage than good
 
Heck I see young people buy a drink at Speedway with a debit card. They carry little to no cash, which blows my mind.
I carry no cash most of the time. My check is direct deposited and my bank has gone down to 1 branch in town and its out of my way to get there.
 
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