2023 season

Dear Vetterhead. I'll admit when I'm wrong something you should start to think about. I know you're still reeling from learning last time you challenged me that your holier than thou GGCL education is an equal to or lesser than what the better public CHL schools are delivering, but while I was absolutely wrong about Seton who had a great year last year (sans the blowout vs. MND) and having two top tier teams last year in the GGCL with MND and Seton set them apart differently than I had seen them, UA and MM still kinda suck. And unless SUA figures it out they are pretty much in that same camp as the later. MND better get a handle on that as well or they will fall back to the toothless program they were in the late twenty teens joining the rest of the GGCL.
 
From time to time you have some pretty insightful comments. Lately though.....

Interesting you fail to mention Taylor, the reigning CHL champ (along with Wyoming) in your comments. Also interesting (maybe uneducated?) that Mariemont is an afterthought in mentioning perennial leaders in the league - it looks like they've been in the top two for 14 of the last 20 years, top 3 in 19 of those 20.

If you're basing your Reading comments on their current record and recent "dominant performances", they've played arguably 4 of the worst teams in Cincinnati, with coach allowing his daughter to score 6 goals in a 10-0 drubbing - pretty unethical, and better should be expected from BS. An no, they will not beat anyone besides Finneytown or Deer Park this year.

In regards to Batavia, the aforementioned teams (Wyoming, Indian Hill and Madeira) all play traditionally strong non-conference schedules. There's a reason they all, including Mariemont and Summit, have Batavia on their schedules. Batavia is a quality opponent.
Fluffernut, I wasn't dismissing Mariemont. I've been on here a long time and have sung the praises of Mariemont. The Hill, Madeira and Wyoming have been to the state final game, winners and losers. That's why I put the +/- by Mariemont, my mistake I can see how that could be taken. The CHL has many great coaches and Mariemont is no different. It's early but the lady Warriors are definitely out performing their current talent.
As for Taylor they have had a decent run and really stepped up last couple years. But when I think of the true long term CHL leaders Taylor isn't on my mind. They have been doing well lately and I hope that continues.
I was poking fun of Reading. Always have, always will. They are the Norwood of the CHL, hence why I said they should join the SWOC and take the other two schools from the CHL with them. Let Norwood and St Bernard from the MVC join and the group of terrible schools can all play each other. Batavia should join the CHL as well as Bethel-Tate.
 
MND 1 Ursuline 1 - Even though my posts keep getting moderated, it doesn't change the facts. MND is in trouble and it starts from the top. They just tied the weakest two teams in the GGCL while Seton just blasted UA 6/0.
 
Even though my posts keep getting moderated, it doesn't change the facts. … is in trouble and it starts from the top. They just tied the weakest two teams
I saw/read your post on Wednesday before it was reported, accurate. My friend‘s daughter played there and always thought she reported negative posts about the program. Very insecure and immature.
 
Wow, what a great win for Oak Hills! Seton hadn't given up any goals all year and hadn't been shutout yet.

MND 3
Beavercreek 1

MND showed some life. I believe they will be just fine this season. Beavercreek is now 0-4-1 and has given up a ton of goals.


McNicholas 4
Roger Bacon 3

This was a fun back and forth game!
 
Got to watch the Oak Hills and Seton game. The high line cost Seton the game and just like I have been saying a fast forward who gets the through ball played to them and the refs call offside correctly like they did, it will cost them. Pennekamp is one of the best players in high school right now, I've been saying it since her freshman year. Great coaching how to deal with the offside trap by Oak Hills and great finishing by Pennekamp.

Been a very idiosyncratic year in soccer so far.
 
I also think some clubs feed HS kids a lot of bogus stuff about the only path to D1 is not playing HS.. etc.. But that is a whole different topic.
What does D1 really do for a female soccer player? Not much other than some day in the future they can say I played D1 soccer blah blah blah. Better off focusing on academics. There is a lot more scholarship money available for kids who are high performers in the classroom. Most of the kids “committing” to D1 get very little money if any.
 
What does D1 really do for a female soccer player? Not much other than some day in the future they can say I played D1 soccer blah blah blah. Better off focusing on academics. There is a lot more scholarship money available for kids who are high performers in the classroom. Most of the kids “committing” to D1 get very little money if any.
If you love the sport, it gives you the ability to play the best competition. It gives you financial, academic and physical support unavailable to the normal student. You travel to some very cool places, play on some very historic field and participate in games that you will never forget. You meet many different people and learn how to balance a life both in the classroom and the field. You learn how to communicate and teaches you both responsibility and time management. Forbes and Linked In have done multiple studies and reports on how D1 athletes thrive in the work place and I had a meeting with Earnst and Young recently on why big companies are seeking D1 female athletes because of how they do so well in pressure situations and social dynamics. In fact over 50% of female CEO's were D1 Athletes and 95% of fortune 500 CEO's were Collegiate athletes.

You still get academic money as most, though not all schools stack scholarship dollars. I hear parents all the time say they didn't take the D1 road because they were more worried about "academics", as if Degrees from most D1 schools are not as good as D2 or D3. Just be honest and say you didnt get the offers, or didn't get the money. My kids are great students. I'm lucky, so combined with academic money and athletic money they have put themselves in a very good position. My oldest is a D1 XC, Indoor and Outdoor track athlete. The only truly year long D1 sport there is. She's also a nursing major and doing clinicals. She qualified for the Conference meets and made the deans list. It's a lot of work but she will walk out having had some great experiences, raced with and against some of her idol's, raced in some bad a** stadiums and courses, and will leave school almost debt free, with a great degree and a near guaranteed well paying job. My middle is committed for Soccer to a great school with a highly competitive team. And I expect my youngest daughter will be as well.

These kids who really want to play at the D1 level (not just post about it on Instagram) work really, really hard. I know my kids do. Don't diminish the reward. I mean everyone is entitled to their opinion but seems kind of crappy to me. As if you can't be a great athlete and a great student.
 
If you love the sport, it gives you the ability to play the best competition. It gives you financial, academic and physical support unavailable to the normal student. . .
Your kids may be at schools where they were aiming high both athletically and academically, but a lot of kids aren’t able to do that.
Not all D1s are created equally and not all universities are created equally. Kids playing at the highest levels are generally pretty driven kids. So it’s honestly crazy to see these smart, driven kids choosing to attend Eastern Appalachian University of Basketweaving (a D1!!!!!!!!) to play soccer. Do they gain something by being a student athlete? Sure. Do they lose something by attending a lower quality academic institution? Yes. When I hear kids saying they are “focusing on the academics,” I hear them saying that they are going to prioritize their academic opportunities. That’s not a slam on kids playing D1. And it’s not saying that Eastern Appalachian blah blah blah doesn’t have good students. It’s just an acknowledgement that degrees are not all created equally.

(No slam on any particular schools and certainly not your kids’ schools.)
 
Your kids may be at schools where they were aiming high both athletically and academically, but a lot of kids aren’t able to do that.
Not all D1s are created equally and not all universities are created equally. Kids playing at the highest levels are generally pretty driven kids. So it’s honestly crazy to see these smart, driven kids choosing to attend Eastern Appalachian University of Basketweaving (a D1!!!!!!!!) to play soccer. Do they gain something by being a student athlete? Sure. Do they lose something by attending a lower quality academic institution? Yes. When I hear kids saying they are “focusing on the academics,” I hear them saying that they are going to prioritize their academic opportunities. That’s not a slam on kids playing D1. And it’s not saying that Eastern Appalachian blah blah blah doesn’t have good students. It’s just an acknowledgement that degrees are not all created equally.

(No slam on any particular schools and certainly not your kids’ schools.)
I appreciate your insight, and kind of agree but only to a point. Though I will throw in that in most cases with most degree's the vast majority of employers are not turning away applicants because they graduated from Middle Wyoming State. Maybe you could earn some favor in the medical, engineering or legal fields with specific school degree's but as a whole your average business, Marketing, Bio, tech degree is a degree. If anything it's the smaller D2 and D3 schools that people have not heard of where some question may come into play. At least from what HR managers tell me. Example I just got a resume from an IT guy who was at Rogers State. Maybe I'm sheltered but that was a head scratcher for me. I thought maybe it was an online school. Nope. What I'm saying is very few D1 schools are truly obscure and seen as poorly educated. There are academic standards that schools have to meet to become D1 aside from the number of teams and athletes they field.

But even if there was a poor D1 education choice school if you go there as an athlete you still get the extra's and if it's seen as a lower quality D1 it's probably a public school vs most D2 and D3's that are private and the cost is much more. So you would be saving even more money by stacking. I mean if you have a specific degree your searching for, go after it. But I'd say the bad schools kids chose for D1 are the vast minority.
 
If you love the sport, it gives you the ability to play the best competition. It gives you financial, academic and physical support unavailable to the normal student. You travel to some very cool places, play on some very historic field and participate in games that you will never forget. You meet many different people and learn how to balance a life both in the classroom and the field. You learn how to communicate and teaches you both responsibility and time management. Forbes and Linked In have done multiple studies and reports on how D1 athletes thrive in the work place and I had a meeting with Earnst and Young recently on why big companies are seeking D1 female athletes because of how they do so well in pressure situations and social dynamics. In fact over 50% of female CEO's were D1 Athletes and 95% of fortune 500 CEO's were Collegiate athletes.

You still get academic money as most, though not all schools stack scholarship dollars. I hear parents all the time say they didn't take the D1 road because they were more worried about "academics", as if Degrees from most D1 schools are not as good as D2 or D3. Just be honest and say you didnt get the offers, or didn't get the money. My kids are great students. I'm lucky, so combined with academic money and athletic money they have put themselves in a very good position. My oldest is a D1 XC, Indoor and Outdoor track athlete. The only truly year long D1 sport there is. She's also a nursing major and doing clinicals. She qualified for the Conference meets and made the deans list. It's a lot of work but she will walk out having had some great experiences, raced with and against some of her idol's, raced in some bad a** stadiums and courses, and will leave school almost debt free, with a great degree and a near guaranteed well paying job. My middle is committed for Soccer to a great school with a highly competitive team. And I expect my youngest daughter will be as well.

These kids who really want to play at the D1 level (not just post about it on Instagram) work really, really hard. I know my kids do. Don't diminish the reward. I mean everyone is entitled to their opinion but seems kind of crappy to me. As if you can't be a great athlete and a great student.
You can do all of those things at D2, D3, D whatever and probably get as much money to do so. When I get resumes I do like to see people who played organized athletics, but could care less what D they played. I look for GPA, service, and academic endeavors more than anything. If I get something from Middle Wyoming State it definitely does not go to the top of the pile.

Truth is that the majority of people just love saying “D1” like it’s some sort of status symbol. When I coached a lot of parents were so thirsty for the D1 status they would pass on schools that were a much better fit and their kids quit after year 1 or 2 to transfer to a school that is a better fit. I also don’t like to see a poor academic performer get into a school (any division/ any sport ) because they can play a sport potentially displacing kids with much better academic performance. I get that D1 football and basketball are different and bring in a ton of $$$$ for the schools, but let’s not pretend that academics come first.
 
If you love the sport, it gives you the ability to play the best competition. It gives you financial, academic and physical support unavailable to the normal student. You travel to some very cool places, play on some very historic field and participate in games that you will never forget. You meet many different people and learn how to balance a life both in the classroom and the field. You learn how to communicate and teaches you both responsibility and time management. Forbes and Linked In have done multiple studies and reports on how D1 athletes thrive in the work place and I had a meeting with Earnst and Young recently on why big companies are seeking D1 female athletes because of how they do so well in pressure situations and social dynamics. In fact over 50% of female CEO's were D1 Athletes and 95% of fortune 500 CEO's were Collegiate athletes.

You still get academic money as most, though not all schools stack scholarship dollars. I hear parents all the time say they didn't take the D1 road because they were more worried about "academics", as if Degrees from most D1 schools are not as good as D2 or D3. Just be honest and say you didnt get the offers, or didn't get the money. My kids are great students. I'm lucky, so combined with academic money and athletic money they have put themselves in a very good position. My oldest is a D1 XC, Indoor and Outdoor track athlete. The only truly year long D1 sport there is. She's also a nursing major and doing clinicals. She qualified for the Conference meets and made the deans list. It's a lot of work but she will walk out having had some great experiences, raced with and against some of her idol's, raced in some bad a** stadiums and courses, and will leave school almost debt free, with a great degree and a near guaranteed well paying job. My middle is committed for Soccer to a great school with a highly competitive team. And I expect my youngest daughter will be as well.

These kids who really want to play at the D1 level (not just post about it on Instagram) work really, really hard. I know my kids do. Don't diminish the reward. I mean everyone is entitled to their opinion but seems kind of crappy to me. As if you can't be a great athlete and a great student.
I'm not in disagreement with your post. But the fact is that all of the positives that you list, with the exception of "racing/playing in some bad a** stadiums", can be garnered from activities other than sports, and in levels of competitiveness below D1. Also, there are many D1 schools that offer phenomenal academic opportunities--in regards to those parents that said otherwise.

"It gives you financial, academic and physical support unavailable to the normal student." There are other avenues in which students can receive the same financial, academic and physical support.

I love sports and all of my children have learned many things and life lessons through sports. I say this as someone who received D1 offers in multiple sports. I took one of those offers and played one sport at a D1 college that was a highly competitive academic institution, double majoring in two life sciences, preparing for Med School. I chose this school because of academics, not sports. Fortunately, academically, I had almost all of my tuition covered. Because of the labs involved with both of my majors, I was late to practice by 15min 3/5 days a week. This was not acceptable. I felt little support of my academic endeavors, and was essentially harassed about being late. I quit after the first year. I still enjoyed the sport recreationally (my father's advice at the time-He had played pro soccer in Europe). The fact is that there are academic fields and majors, and some post graduate schooling goals, that will not work with D1 sports--Vet School, Med School, Dental School, and the highly competitive scientific PhD programs, just to name some of which I am familiar. With these programs strong GPAs/entrance exams are usually not enough.

My eldest is at a highly competitive academic school (D1), double majoring in neuroscience and biochemistry, seeking to go to Med School. He received academic scholarships from the college and other sources totaling over 70% of his tuition. He has a GPA of 3.96 and a MCAT 515. Could he have done this while playing D1 soccer-No. His Majors, GPA and MCAT while great, may not be enough to get him into a mid to high level Med School. He has had his plan drawn up since his sophomore year in high school. (He played soccer through high school) And his plan has been a job. He has had to incorporate many activities in order to be certain that med school was the right fit and to try to give him the best possible experiences for preparation. These include: Participating in co-op activities at Medical Schools (ie UC-Med TAP program etc) Volunteering at homeless shelters, food banks, and nursing homes, Volunteering at hospitals, Shadowing Physicians and Surgeons, Drawing up and putting into place a plan to teach soccer to children at a deaf school, volunteering at Habit for Humanity, Planning and carrying out activities for homeless shelters like Christmas parties for the children, Mission trips, Refereeing Soccer (lot of great ammo there for college and Med School Applications), Working in a scientific research lab, Presenting his research at Scientific symposiums, Publishing his scientific research, starting a non-profit, and much more. He will need all of this, maybe more, for a chance to get into a good Med School. So I would say, depending upon the students goals, you cannot always be a great athlete and a great student.

My middle child has received D1 interest-not directly, through others. She is a sophomore in High School. She's not sure if she wants to play in college. We will let her decide. But her choice of college will be decided by her chosen major and career path, not sports. If she elects to play soccer, and it aligns with her academic pursuits, we will work with her/ask her to set ground rules to ensure that academics is always her priority. If her academic and career goals do not align with a soccer scholarship, or she decides not to play, we will pay for her education. Which will be a much easier, since we wouldn't be paying for Club Soccer for her! We're not sure what our youngest will, do-time will tell.
 
People are you really saying not to play D1 if you can play D1? I mean you’re really not trying to say that right? I don’t have it in me to read these long responses again. It’s the best. Any argument opposing it is simply those parents who don’t have a D1 kid. Not doing it because you can’t with your major? I can see that, truthfully I think it’s unusual but possible. Not choosing to play D1 athletics because D2 or D3 can offer you the same or better? I have no words for you people. Our eldest daughter and her best friend went to the same school. One played soccer the other didn’t. They had such different experiences it was like they were at two different universities. Yes by all means pass up playing soccer at UC, Miami or OSU to go to Findlay, Wilmington or Malone.
 
People are you really saying not to play D1 if you can play D1? I mean you’re really not trying to say that right? I don’t have it in me to read these long responses again. It’s the best. Any argument opposing it is simply those parents who don’t have a D1 kid.
Completely agree. I heard these same types of comments on our club teams after recruiting didn‘t go how some had hoped.
 
People are you really saying not to play D1 if you can play D1? I mean you’re really not trying to say that right? I don’t have it in me to read these long responses again. It’s the best. Any argument opposing it is simply those parents who don’t have a D1 kid. Not doing it because you can’t with your major? I can see that, truthfully I think it’s unusual but possible. Not choosing to play D1 athletics because D2 or D3 can offer you the same or better? I have no words for you people. Our eldest daughter and her best friend went to the same school. One played soccer the other didn’t. They had such different experiences it was like they were at two different universities. Yes by all means pass up playing soccer at UC, Miami or OSU to go to Findlay, Wilmington or Malone.
My daughter had D1 interest and offers. She decided to go D2 because she found a coach she liked. A program she liked. They have a beautiful incredible facility with video boards, fresh gear, and travel all over no different then a D1 does. She play on TV and streams just like D1. She wanted a better soccer/life balance and due to her major. She got a significant amount of money and piled that on to her exceptional money for grades. College is going to be very cheap for her. She is Pre-Med and one of the D1 coaches told her that Pre-Meds will need to switch to nursing majors to play soccer at that level. So no D1 is not the end all to everything especially in soccer. 99% of the girls who play D1 will never play another minute of soccer after they graduate. So as long as education is getting paid for its all the same IMO
 
People are you really saying not to play D1 if you can play D1? I mean you’re really not trying to say that right? I don’t have it in me to read these long responses again. It’s the best. Any argument opposing it is simply those parents who don’t have a D1 kid. Not doing it because you can’t with your major? I can see that, truthfully I think it’s unusual but possible. Not choosing to play D1 athletics because D2 or D3 can offer you the same or better? I have no words for you people. Our eldest daughter and her best friend went to the same school. One played soccer the other didn’t. They had such different experiences it was like they were at two different universities. Yes by all means pass up playing soccer at UC, Miami or OSU to go to Findlay, Wilmington or Malone.
Yes-saying exactly that. There are examples where D1 is not feasible due to academics/post undergrad education and career goals. Maybe not everyone's focus, but to some parents and players, academics/career precede sports. In some cases, as I pointed out in my previous post, you cannot have both. That is one reason my post was long, to attempt to elucidate all the extra activities that are, in some cases, required in order to achieve one's goals. There are cases where D2 is a better academic fit due to specific program offerings---there was an example cited on this board a few years ago of a GK that took the D2 offer over the D1 offer, due to a major/program offered at the D2 school. I certainly wouldn't choose Findley, Wilmington, or Malone over UC, Miami, or OSU-but there's a very good chance I would choose Case Western Reserve over those schools depending on major as well as my child's personality.

Long responses are also sometimes needed to counter gross generalizations, such as
"Any argument opposing it is simply those parents who don’t have a D1 kid" Not always true. I have a minimum of two D1 kids. I played D1. I know other parents that quit playing D1 to focus on academics, when they realized the efforts that would be required to be accepted to law school, med school, dental school, and vet school. I know players that turned down D1 offers in favor of academics.
 
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