Northwest Ohio Realignment

ToledoGuy

Active member
Not in my experience. Larger schools tend to spend more money per student. Part of that may be that larger schools are in urban areas, but more importantly I find that larger schools have more bloated bureaucracies.

Two smaller schools might have one principal each. If they merge, there tends to be one overall principal and then two-vice principals. Instead of one athletic director apiece, their is now one overall athletic director and two assistant AD's. Etc.
Yep, it's definitely a slippery slope. Washington Local looks to be doing more of the later with their reorganization of schools...everything I've heard points to the combined elementary school (taking over for Wernert and Jackman), and the combined Junior High (taking 6th from the elementary schools while combining 7th and 8th and mushing them all together in one building by the old Erme Field/Library area) all having multiple principals, not just vice principals. So really, there is no cutback whatsoever on administrative bloat, though they will save considerably on facility maintenance (which I feel is more to dap's point).
 

irish_buffalo

Well-known member
Yep, it's definitely a slippery slope. Washington Local looks to be doing more of the later with their reorganization of schools...everything I've heard points to the combined elementary school (taking over for Wernert and Jackman), and the combined Junior High (taking 6th from the elementary schools while combining 7th and 8th and mushing them all together in one building by the old Erme Field/Library area) all having multiple principals, not just vice principals. So really, there is no cutback whatsoever on administrative bloat, though they will save considerably on facility maintenance (which I feel is more to dap's point).
Much of this has to do with funding these days. Positions not being replaced. Teachers being asked to cover more ground. Etc.
 

Mr. Slippery

Well-known member
Not in my experience. Larger schools tend to spend more money per student. Part of that may be that larger schools are in urban areas, but more importantly I find that larger schools have more bloated bureaucracies.

Two smaller schools might have one principal each. If they merge, there tends to be one overall principal and then two-vice principals. Instead of one athletic director apiece, their is now one overall athletic director and two assistant AD's. Etc.
Years ago on this board, I remarked at how dominant the suburban schools in Central Ohio would be if they didn't continue building additional HSs (for example, Dublin, Hilliard, Westerville all have 3 HSs). One of the arguments for building more HSs was the additional opportunities that are created for the students. There are only so many kids you can put on the basketball team. There are are only so many players who can be on the playing field or court at one time, and there are only so many minutes in a game. There are only so many speaking parts in the school plays. There are only so many positions on student council...etc.
 

ToledoGuy

Active member
Years ago on this board, I remarked at how dominant the suburban schools in Central Ohio would be if they didn't continue building additional HSs (for example, Dublin, Hilliard, Westerville all have 3 HSs). One of the arguments for building more HSs was the additional opportunities that are created for the students. There are only so many kids you can put on the basketball team. There are are only so many players who can be on the playing field or court at one time, and there are only so many minutes in a game. There are only so many speaking parts in the school plays. There are only so many positions on student council...etc.

I think the Olentangy schools showed that's not necessarily true though...they've got multiple schools that a state competitive in multiple sports every year it seems.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I think the Olentangy schools showed that's not necessarily true though...they've got multiple schools that a state competitive in multiple sports every year it seems.

they also all have very high (state tax money) economics and stable family demographics, all the things that correlate with extra-curricular success. They can afford the coaches, the trainers, the athletic extras. Other than the original Olentangy (and only part still), these are not salt of the Earth communities. They are created communities of skilled and professional trades families. I'm not sure even Sylvania and PBurg are comparable.

With an open or private enrollement that mimics a large school, sure it can be done. But all in one building eliminates the big fish in little pond option some will take and puts ALL the talent into one competitive triage.
 

ToledoGuy

Active member
they also all have very high (state tax money) economics and stable family demographics, all the things that correlate with extra-curricular success. They can afford the coaches, the trainers, the athletic extras. Other than the original Olentangy (and only part still), these are not salt of the Earth communities. They are created communities of skilled and professional trades families. I'm not sure even Sylvania and PBurg are comparable.

With an open or private enrollement that mimics a large school, sure it can be done. But all in one building eliminates the big fish in little pond option some will take and puts ALL the talent into one competitive triage.

Oh, for sure, it's a difficult decision either way and Olentangy is a completely different beast than anything we have up here for sure (I'd say it is a supercharged version of Anthony Wayne SD if anything matches at all).
 

dappling

Active member
Not in my experience. Larger schools tend to spend more money per student. Part of that may be that larger schools are in urban areas, but more importantly I find that larger schools have more bloated bureaucracies.

Two smaller schools might have one principal each. If they merge, there tends to be one overall principal and then two-vice principals. Instead of one athletic director apiece, their is now one overall athletic director and two assistant AD's. Etc.
The philosophy Indiana is to have big schools...the schools surrounding Indianapolis for example have between 3-5000 kids. That is one football staff, one band director, one cafeteria manager, etc. From a facilities standpoint, it is one auditorium, one football stadium, etc.
 

CCHS93

Active member
they also all have very high (state tax money) economics and stable family demographics, all the things that correlate with extra-curricular success. They can afford the coaches, the trainers, the athletic extras. Other than the original Olentangy (and only part still), these are not salt of the Earth communities. They are created communities of skilled and professional trades families. I'm not sure even Sylvania and PBurg are comparable.

With an open or private enrollement that mimics a large school, sure it can be done. But all in one building eliminates the big fish in little pond option some will take and puts ALL the talent into one competitive triage.
I agree with you, for the most part. AW is about the closest thing we have up here.
 

smurfyeah19

Active member
Years ago on this board, I remarked at how dominant the suburban schools in Central Ohio would be if they didn't continue building additional HSs (for example, Dublin, Hilliard, Westerville all have 3 HSs). One of the arguments for building more HSs was the additional opportunities that are created for the students. There are only so many kids you can put on the basketball team. There are are only so many players who can be on the playing field or court at one time, and there are only so many minutes in a game. There are only so many speaking parts in the school plays. There are only so many positions on student council...etc.
Used to live in Hilliard. I think the biggest issue would be traffic with this plan. You’d have kids on the bus for 2-3 hours haha
 

D1nwobb

Active member
In terms of number of students, Olentangy Local Schools is the 4th largest district in Ohio. Based on the most current ODE data, Olentangy is slightly larger than Toledo Public for K-12. That is mind boggling.

Olentangy has over 21,000 students. Compare that to Sylvania with around 7,500, Perrysburg just over 5,000, and AW just over 4,000.
 

ToledoGuy

Active member
In terms of number of students, Olentangy Local Schools is the 4th largest district in Ohio. Based on the most current ODE data, Olentangy is slightly larger than Toledo Public for K-12. That is mind boggling.

Olentangy has over 21,000 students. Compare that to Sylvania with around 7,500, Perrysburg just over 5,000, and AW just over 4,000.

Yep...driving through there on 315 all the time back in the mid to late 00s was crazy. Completely different community than it was in 2005, housing developments just popping up all over the place, but thats a sign of a growing regional economy tied with an incredibly large University. Huge influx of people in C-bus over the last two decades...once Hilliard and Dublin filled up, and with the restrictions on plot size in Plain City, Olentangy LSD (more specifically Powell and Lewis Center) just blew up.
 

BirdDog10

Well-known member
Not in my experience. Larger schools tend to spend more money per student. Part of that may be that larger schools are in urban areas, but more importantly I find that larger schools have more bloated bureaucracies.

Two smaller schools might have one principal each. If they merge, there tends to be one overall principal and then two-vice principals. Instead of one athletic director apiece, their is now one overall athletic director and two assistant AD's. Etc.
There's a balance to the perfect consolidation/districting that no district or state has ever figured out. In every different situation, you can make the argument that school districts can consolidate for whatever reason, to save on overhead costs, offer more opportunities, less facilities, etc. You can also look at the small Putnam and Mercer County schools that perform very well for their size, and make the argument that they offer a better "product" (whether education or athletics) comparatively because they are smaller and can focus on each student more than they would be able to if the district was consolidated.

There's no district or state that has it figured out. When you find one, let me know. lol
 

smurfyeah19

Active member
Yep...driving through there on 315 all the time back in the mid to late 00s was crazy. Completely different community than it was in 2005, housing developments just popping up all over the place, but thats a sign of a growing regional economy tied with an incredibly large University. Huge influx of people in C-bus over the last two decades...once Hilliard and Dublin filled up, and with the restrictions on plot size in Plain City, Olentangy LSD (more specifically Powell and Lewis Center) just blew up.
I’d say it’s a sign of the times. Companies started going Bachelor degree required, and Ohio State is one of the largest schools in the country.

Makes sense that the area would explode with as many large corporations as Central Ohio has
 

RollingTrain

Well-known member
In terms of number of students, Olentangy Local Schools is the 4th largest district in Ohio. Based on the most current ODE data, Olentangy is slightly larger than Toledo Public for K-12. That is mind boggling.

Olentangy has over 21,000 students. Compare that to Sylvania with around 7,500, Perrysburg just over 5,000, and AW just over 4,000.
The entire Olentangy district is an absolute logistics nightmare. They did all this development and failed to improve infrastructure along the way. It’s completely land locked - 315 and 23 is essentially the only major highway access point to the area and it’s nothing but traffic light after traffic light. Then you go to the east and there is 71, but it goes 10 miles from Sunbury to Polaris without an exit. It’s truly amazing that they managed to screw up as bad as they did. Good luck getting to Olentangy HS around 5:00 from say, Upper Arlington.
 

ToledoGuy

Active member
The entire Olentangy district is an absolute logistics nightmare. They did all this development and failed to improve infrastructure along the way. It’s completely land locked - 315 and 23 is essentially the only major highway access point to the area and it’s nothing but traffic light after traffic light. Then you go to the east and there is 71, but it goes 10 miles from Sunbury to Polaris without an exit. It’s truly amazing that they managed to screw up as bad as they did. Good luck getting to Olentangy HS around 5:00 from say, Upper Arlington.

Truthfully, you could replace Olentangy district with "North/Northwest Columbus" and it would make just as much sense. That was community growth before planning could get in there and figure it out. Farmers selling land to developers who had buddies on the township boards, building houses before anyone really understood that a two lane 55mph winding road on a wooded river bank that floods probably isn't a great move to push about 5000 people into that main "arterial" road.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
Because the OSU Traffic Engineering program can't figure out "merge lane?" To be fair, from 2pm to near 7pm, a snail could cross Wastenaw Ave in Ann Arbor without risk of smoosh.

I can't even figure out the attraction up there? The landscape is boring. The towns are boring. The strip malls are boring. The nearby city is boring. You get drunk, you're not going to know which house is yours.
 

ToledoGuy

Active member
Because the OSU Traffic Engineering program can't figure out "merge lane?" To be fair, from 2pm to near 7pm, a snail could cross Wastenaw Ave in Ann Arbor without risk of smoosh.

I can't even figure out the attraction up there? The landscape is boring. The towns are boring. The strip malls are boring. The nearby city is boring. You get drunk, you're not going to know which house is yours.

More like one side of the brain (township development/planning boards) wasn't talking to the other (County engineers/ODOT) when everything was going crazy down there...but yeah, Ann Arbor is an absolute nightmare too.
 

eastisbest

Well-known member
I think your routine needs work. That wasn't a joke so much as, ... I don't really know what category that goes into. Civilized? no, Remotely pertinent? no... nope, can't come up with it. Closest? non sequitar?
 

chs1971

Well-known member
The entire Olentangy district is an absolute logistics nightmare. They did all this development and failed to improve infrastructure along the way. It’s completely land locked - 315 and 23 is essentially the only major highway access point to the area and it’s nothing but traffic light after traffic light. Then you go to the east and there is 71, but it goes 10 miles from Sunbury to Polaris without an exit. It’s truly amazing that they managed to screw up as bad as they did. Good luck getting to Olentangy HS around 5:00 from say, Upper Arlington.
The port facilities at Toledo and Cleveland both service ocean going ships and their schools are terrible.
 
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