Coaching Pay

WhatsupDoc

Well-known member
How is coaching pay done? I saw on another thread that one of the State Champion Coaches gets a bonus for winning a state title. How are bonuses and pay calculated?
 
 
I can only speak to public schools, as the private schools fall under slightly different pay ways. At a public school the pay is set by the master agreement. Every public school in Ohio has a master agreement setting the wage scale for supplemental contracts. Different supplemental contracts have different pay (usually a percent of 1st year teachers pay) and different steps for the amount of experience a coach has. Some master agreements have stipulations for an additional amount for each step in the playoffs that a team reaches. Usually this is because these additional weeks extend the ending of the season.
 
I can only speak to public schools, as the private schools fall under slightly different pay ways. At a public school the pay is set by the master agreement. Every public school in Ohio has a master agreement setting the wage scale for supplemental contracts. Different supplemental contracts have different pay (usually a percent of 1st year teachers pay) and different steps for the amount of experience a coach has. Some master agreements have stipulations for an additional amount for each step in the playoffs that a team reaches. Usually this is because these additional weeks extend the ending of the season.
Think you are looking "CBA" boy master agreements. Just about every public school CBA is public information, so if you are curious, you can google "insert school game" CBA agreement, for exampe. Chardon local schools CBA. You should get the most recent copy. From
There you can see what the pay is. Like chardon headcoach pay is $8365 x 103%
 
Many football HCs are officially the school's AD or hold some administrator position elsewhere in the school that is many times outside the purview of the CBA that the teachers have.

Smaller schools, a lot of time you see the Football HC is also a vice-principal or assistant principal. Which seems more a way to pay the coach more compared to the school's other sports coaches. And usually do very minimal work in that other position. Some big schools in Texas, the HC is the AD for the school, and then there's an assistant AD that does the actual work of the position.
 
Smaller schools, a lot of time you see the Football HC is also a vice-principal or assistant principal. Which seems more a way to pay the coach more compared to the school's other sports coaches. And usually do very minimal work in that other position.
I’d have to see this to believe it, much less ‘a lot of time’. Small schools especially simply don’t have the money to throw around like this.
 
Many football HCs are officially the school's AD or hold some administrator position elsewhere in the school that is many times outside the purview of the CBA that the teachers have.

Smaller schools, a lot of time you see the Football HC is also a vice-principal or assistant principal. Which seems more a way to pay the coach more compared to the school's other sports coaches. And usually do very minimal work in that other position. Some big schools in Texas, the HC is the AD for the school, and then there's an assistant AD that does the actual work of the position.
No.
 
The days of hiring a coach to be an administrator are becoming few and far between as the demands of the two roles have increased exponentially in the past decade or so. This doesn't mean that there aren't several districts that still utilize this method, but those opportunities are becoming more scarce every year. I think most districts are not in a position to pay an administrator salary to effectively coach full time, and be a part-time administrator.

With that being said, all public school employees salaries are public information and the pay rates for coaches are published in all contracts. Stipends for coaching are often a percentage of a salary scale, usually about 20-25% of a full year's salary of a first year teacher. Again, each district negotiates their own stipends and pay scale, so coaching stipends can fluctuate greatly based upon the district and contract.
 
The days of hiring a coach to be an administrator are becoming few and far between as the demands of the two roles have increased exponentially in the past decade or so. This doesn't mean that there aren't several districts that still utilize this method, but those opportunities are becoming more scarce every year. I think most districts are not in a position to pay an administrator salary to effectively coach full time, and be a part-time administrator.

With that being said, all public school employees salaries are public information and the pay rates for coaches are published in all contracts. Stipends for coaching are often a percentage of a salary scale, usually about 20-25% of a full year's salary of a first year teacher. Again, each district negotiates their own stipends and pay scale, so coaching stipends can fluctuate greatly based upon the district and contract.
%20-25 if that were the case every high school teacher would coach, try under %10 at most places.

Interesting thing about coaches pay is as it continues not to keep up with inflation, demands and time from coaches continues to increase at most places
 
Think you are looking "CBA" boy master agreements. Just about every public school CBA is public information, so if you are curious, you can google "insert school game" CBA agreement, for exampe. Chardon local schools CBA. You should get the most recent copy. From
There you can see what the pay is. Like chardon headcoach pay is $8365 x 103%
Yes, I am a retired teacher/ guidance counselor. The contracts called a supplemental contractI believe for all sports is based as a percent above the persons teaching salary with football coaches earning the most. Private schools I am not sure of the set up. My guess is a high school football head coach in Ohio earns in the range of 6 to 10 thousand dollars added on to whatever his teaching contract is. Teachers are paid by years of service plus continuing ed courses a master degree or beyond. I read somewhere that high school football coaches in Texas make a lot of money for just coaching football and not teaching. In Ohio most high school football staffs the coaches are also contracted teachers.
 
%20-25 if that were the case every high school teacher would coach, try under %10 at most places.

Interesting thing about coaches pay is as it continues not to keep up with inflation, demands and time from coaches continues to increase at most places
20% for a head varsity football coach is common in northeast Ohio. Most public schools are likely a few % points above that. Assistants and lower levels are the ones around the 10% mark depending on the district and contract. I can assure you 20% of the BASE pay isn't motivating many teachers to pickup a clipboard and whistle. There are many open coaching positions in all varsity sports across Ohio. Smaller schools in the Mahoning Valley are starting to struggle to fill openings in sports likes volleyball, basketball and softball. Heck, I know varsity football coaches that can barely field a staff anymore and have hire guys with no experience or guys that can only be there once or twice a week because of their jobs. The premier programs and districts aren't facing these battles, but struggling schools and programs are running out of answers.
 
Many football HCs are officially the school's AD or hold some administrator position elsewhere in the school that is many times outside the purview of the CBA that the teachers have.

Smaller schools, a lot of time you see the Football HC is also a vice-principal or assistant principal. Which seems more a way to pay the coach more compared to the school's other sports coaches. And usually do very minimal work in that other position. Some big schools in Texas, the HC is the AD for the school, and then there's an assistant AD that does the actual work of the position.
This might be the case in other states, but it's very rare in Ohio, especially in the small school Northwest.

90%+ of the head coaches at small schools are also going to be teachers. Yes, a few may be AD's or principals, but those are the few that have been at their school 10+ years and been promoted up to that position. I'm not familiar with a single small school head coach that got hired into their district as an administrator.

I see even less small schools with an "assistant AD" even when the AD is the head coach of a sport. At our school the AD (who's spent his whole career teaching at our school) is the cross country head coach and we don't have an assistant AD. During the fall he is still performing all of the AD's duties on top of coaching. When there is a scheduling conflict (XC meet at the same time as another sporting event) they hire other staff at the school per diem to act as the AD at those events
 
%20-25 if that were the case every high school teacher would coach, try under %10 at most places.

Interesting thing about coaches pay is as it continues not to keep up with inflation, demands and time from coaches continues to increase at most places
I looked up a few schools, including Otsego

At Otsego the head football coach is paid 18% of a beginning teachers salary.

The few other school I looked at are similar.

Football and basketball coaches tend to be the same. Other sports less, assistants less, etc.
 
Some schools will offer head coaches additional pay through a "Weight Room Supervisor" stipend. That can be an extra $4-5000 for a coach.
I looking into the contract at Massillon (because why not?) and I was surprised to see how much they pay.

Not sure what a "Football Coordinator, Scouting" position does but its worth a lot of money!
Massillon Football Coaches Pay.png
 
20% for a head varsity football coach is common in northeast Ohio. Most public schools are likely a few % points above that. Assistants and lower levels are the ones around the 10% mark depending on the district and contract. I can assure you 20% of the BASE pay isn't motivating many teachers to pickup a clipboard and whistle. There are many open coaching positions in all varsity sports across Ohio. Smaller schools in the Mahoning Valley are starting to struggle to fill openings in sports likes volleyball, basketball and softball. Heck, I know varsity football coaches that can barely field a staff anymore and have hire guys with no experience or guys that can only be there once or twice a week because of their jobs. The premier programs and districts aren't facing these battles, but struggling schools and programs are running out of answers.
I always liked how assistants like myself who were coordinators and literally put in as much time as the HC got paid thousands less than guys who been coaching for 30 years and weren't worth a lick. I put in twice as much time, twice as competent as you, but because you have been a mediocre at best as a coach for the last 20 years you get more money than me. Reason 103948490 I no longer coach anything. I have said for years, school districts should give HC a pool of money and distribute that to his staff as he sees fit.

To your point about struggling schools- a lot these places treat sports the same they did 30 or 40 years ago, a extracurricular to enhance a students education, not a full time commitment where you have to sacrifice a large portions of your free time.
 
Some schools will offer head coaches additional pay through a "Weight Room Supervisor" stipend. That can be an extra $4-5000 for a coach.
I looking into the contract at Massillon (because why not?) and I was surprised to see how much they pay.

Not sure what a "Football Coordinator, Scouting" position does but its worth a lot of money!
View attachment 51009
So it only gets $10k? Or is that $10k on top of some sort of base?
 
Some schools will offer head coaches additional pay through a "Weight Room Supervisor" stipend. That can be an extra $4-5000 for a coach.
I looking into the contract at Massillon (because why not?) and I was surprised to see how much they pay.

Not sure what a "Football Coordinator, Scouting" position does but its worth a lot of money!
View attachment 51009
I find it interesting that they don't have a HC contract listed here. Assuming that is paid fully through the boosters?
 
20% for a head varsity football coach is common in northeast Ohio. Most public schools are likely a few % points above that. Assistants and lower levels are the ones around the 10% mark depending on the district and contract. I can assure you 20% of the BASE pay isn't motivating many teachers to pickup a clipboard and whistle. There are many open coaching positions in all varsity sports across Ohio. Smaller schools in the Mahoning Valley are starting to struggle to fill openings in sports likes volleyball, basketball and softball. Heck, I know varsity football coaches that can barely field a staff anymore and have hire guys with no experience or guys that can only be there once or twice a week because of their jobs. The premier programs and districts aren't facing these battles, but struggling schools and programs are running out of answers.
Yes, I believe you are spot on correct in that the pay is low comparable to the work and hours required for the job. Hence a lot of openings.
 
I think we can all agree that HS Football coach’s salaries are very low compared to the time they put in.

Looking at it from a different lens (not including the “mini colleges”), could this be why we’re seeing less and less parity in all Divisions.

Let me explain: More often than not we see the same public schools making deep playoff runs. Sure, you have a few one offs each season because of generational classes, but it’s usually the same teams. If we were to look deeper at each of these perennial programs would we find that more often than not the staff, or at minimum, the HC has deep ties/rooted interest (alum, business owner, lived in the community their adult life) in the school/community? I would venture to say these coaches are building programs and cultures and not looking for the next big thing, and are doing it for the love of their community.

Since the pay is so minuscule it seems to be imperative for a school who wants a successful program to hire a coach who has the attributes I mention above. Easier said than done, right?

Is there any correlation here, or am I off base?
 
I think we can all agree that HS Football coach’s salaries are very low compared to the time they put in.

Looking at it from a different lens (not including the “mini colleges”), could this be why we’re seeing less and less parity in all Divisions.

Let me explain: More often than not we see the same public schools making deep playoff runs. Sure, you have a few one offs each season because of generational classes, but it’s usually the same teams. If we were to look deeper at each of these perennial programs would we find that more often than not the staff, or at minimum, the HC has deep ties/rooted interest (alum, business owner, lived in the community their adult life) in the school/community? I would venture to say these coaches are building programs and cultures and not looking for the next big thing, and are doing it for the love of their community.

Since the pay is so minuscule it seems to be imperative for a school who wants a successful program to hire a coach who has the attributes I mention above. Easier said than done, right?

Is there any correlation here, or am I off base?
For most schools I would say you are correct.
 
This might be the case in other states, but it's very rare in Ohio, especially in the small school Northwest.

90%+ of the head coaches at small schools are also going to be teachers. Yes, a few may be AD's or principals, but those are the few that have been at their school 10+ years and been promoted up to that position. I'm not familiar with a single small school head coach that got hired into their district as an administrator.

I see even less small schools with an "assistant AD" even when the AD is the head coach of a sport. At our school the AD (who's spent his whole career teaching at our school) is the cross country head coach and we don't have an assistant AD. During the fall he is still performing all of the AD's duties on top of coaching. When there is a scheduling conflict (XC meet at the same time as another sporting event) they hire other staff at the school per diem to act as the AD at those events
Our AD has been trying to get a part-time Asst AD for years just to help with all the meetings and games. The idea was a teacher would teach until lunch and do AD duties in the afternoon along with helping to staff the different athletic events.
 
Our AD has been trying to get a part-time Asst AD for years just to help with all the meetings and games. The idea was a teacher would teach until lunch and do AD duties in the afternoon along with helping to staff the different athletic events.
We’re a small school but our AD even teaches 2 classes without any assistant AD
 
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