All electric vehicles...will not work.

joesports

Well-known member
People use to say the same thing about planes, gas cars, computers, cell phone and most new technologies … guess what … they just kept getting better and better … my bet is the electric cars, batteries, and charging units will get better over time … are we ready for full time use of electric cars … no, but it will happen … just a matter of time.
 

19AL63

Well-known member
When electric is all you can buy or pay more for the rare but now more expensive gas engine power. Then gas stations will slowly reduce in numbers and gas prices will rise because cost to refine and lower demand. Plus I know the govt will raise taxes higher and higher forcing people to go electric. During this time there no doubt will be a shortage of charging places. You do know they always create a crisis and then spend money had over fist to correct it and if that does not fix it throw more money at it.
 

cabezadecaballo

Well-known member
I was speaking with an electrical engineer yesterday and we were discussing all electric vehicles. He lives in the newest section of town, built his house 4 years ago. He told me "with the electric lines running down our street, there would only be three cars that could charge at one time". Multiply that problem by the size of a small town, small city, New York city.

Electric cars will not replace gas engines.
Not without a tremendous expenditure, and one that is unwarranted. Climate is changing. Always has. None of this green bullsh1t changes any weather outcomes. Every time that we change the rules, whoever is ahead of the curve is able to invest ahead of the change. That is all that is happening here, except that the Dems want SO badly to be “early” on a change that they created a need to meet. They are so far overboard that they call “plant food“ deadly. Anthropogenic global warming is complete BS.
 
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cabezadecaballo

Well-known member
You can charge a vehicle on a 20 amp circuit and get about 25% battery charge in 6 hours (depending on battery size, etc). That all works out to about 2kw per hour.

For reference, a baseboard electric heater uses about 1.5 kw per hour.

If the range on the vehicle is 240 miles, and you drive 40 miles a day, you only need to run the charger 8 hours roughly every other day to top it off.

If everyone in the neighborhood has to drop in a 50amp super charger, then there would need to be upgrades.
I can’t imagine all the dumb broads calling AAA for a charge in a hurry because the groceries are baking roadside in a dead car. Lithium ion insta-fade and 25% charges should be fun.

This is why all the solar/finance schemes want to sell you batteries, too. Everybody’s gonna want to charge when dark is coming on. Many states require local utilities to buy and put user-generated power into the grid, but they want to trick us into storing it for them until THEY call for it.
 

cabezadecaballo

Well-known member
Forty miles is pretty arbitrary. I drive 80 - 90 miles a day some weeks. And I think Tesoro's point is that if we go completely electric you're talking about 2 or more cars per house requiring charging. Heck in my neighborhood throw in a kids car and it's 3 vehicles per some houses.

If we go down this path determining the electric load and ensuring a generous capacity margin needs to be done now. Or we'll all be facing limits on how long we can charge our cars and how far we can drive.

On the bright side we can do what the Chinese are doing and build a bunch of new coal fired electric generating stations to power this new fleet of vehicles. Since the USA has the worlds largest coal reserves it should work out great. And as we upgrade the electric grid we can also harden it against emp bursts.

One question though - will our commercial truck fleet be going electric to?
Red Barchetta was a bit prophetic I guess
 

cabezadecaballo

Well-known member
So what you are saying they are still looking for a win on anything and they will take this if nothing else comes along?
No. They want to profit from abusing power, and they see this as a sure thing. The eventual outcome is anticipated, a “solution” is invented to address an exaggerated problem, and there’s only one control group, so they can never be proven wrong. “At least we tried”, they will say in 50 years.
 

Crusaders

Moderator
FWIW, battery tech is advancing rapidly. I'd bet on Telsa having a 1000 mile range vehicle by the end of the decade.

Range isn't really the big issue with these cars, it's charging speed. You can go from 0 to full in 90 seconds at the pump. It's difficult to imagine a battery being able to duplicate that anytime soon. Traveling habits will sooner change.
 

Termite2

Well-known member
I am not against electric vehicles, but I do have questions on how effective they are in cold weather. Eventually charging time will come down, there is some inventor out there who will figure out how to charge in a short period of time.
 

bigkat

Well-known member
Gotta love it when someone tells someone else to leave the debate forum. bigkat gonna bigkat.
why don't you read what he said, for me to respond like that.... tough guy... got love when you crawl back into yappi.... by the way, wasn't that a Aids worker got blown up by the Biden admin? or where did you read that he was a terrorist? you sitting around with your pilot buddies again? did they happen to give you a little set of wings yet?
 

lotr10

Well-known member
From a personal, drive on the highway standpoint, I'd rather long haul freight by train. :)
When I talk about our commercial trucking fleet, long haul trucks are only a small part of it. Short haul trucking uses millions of trucks.

Just think about the trucking involved in building a house. From delivering the excavating equipment to pouring the concrete to delivering the lumber and everything else literally dozens of trucks are used in the construction of a single house.
 

MoeBiden

Active member
When I talk about our commercial trucking fleet, long haul trucks are only a small part of it. Short haul trucking uses millions of trucks.

Just think about the trucking involved in building a house. From delivering the excavating equipment to pouring the concrete to delivering the lumber and everything else literally dozens of trucks are used in the construction of a single house.
Most of the last article I linked is dealing with local delivery.

“We see that electrification adoption is accelerating across commercial vehicles starting with the light commercial vehicles and buses and continuing with the medium-duty trucks because they are reaching Total Cost of Ownership parity with internal combustion engines pretty much today,” said Beyza Sarioglu, senior director of strategy and business planning for commerical vehicles at Dana. “Especially in urban and regional use cases such as distribution of goods and local services like construction because they require smaller batteries and with their duty cycles they get more benefit from regenerative braking, and different technologies electrification offers. Long-haul, on the other hand, heavy-duty trucks are expected to reach TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) parity in the 2030 timeframe. It’s not going to be a quick transition.”
 

D4fan

Well-known member

When I first contemplated the application of gasoline for vehicles, I had a bicycle plant in Cleveland. Because bikes interested me, my mind naturally turned to something a rider wouldn’t have to push and keep pushing if he was trying to get some place. But the great obstacle to the development of the automobile was the lack of public inter- est. To advocate replacing the horse, which had served man through centuries, marked one as an imbecile. Things are very different today. But in the ’90s, even though I had a successful bicycle business, and was building my first car in the privacy of the cellar in my home, I began to be pointed out as “the fool who is fiddling with a buggy that will run without being hitched to a horse.” My banker called on me to say: “Winton, I am disappointed in you.”

That riled me, but I held my temper as I asked, “What’s the matter with you?” He bellowed: “There’s nothing the matter with me. It’s you! You’re crazy if you think this fool contraption you’ve been wasting your time on will ever displace the horse.”
Did some research last week that kind of coincides with this topic. The first mass produced tractors with rubber tires were very small. International under the Farmall name developed the letter series tractors back in the 1930's. There was the A, B, C (about 20 hp and 2,000 lbs) H and M. The H was the single most successful model and sold over 450,000 tractors in just a few short years. The secret, it was about the same power as a team of horses but could run all day, was similar in purchase cost and could be left unattended in the barn indefinitely vs the daily care of a horse.

The most intriguing thing to me is engineers knew we were headed for large tractors with many times the power of a team of horses. However, they had to wait for farmers to gain confidence in the tractor, and actually generate a benefit from the self propelled workhorse. Then farms needed to grow to finally market the machines in 1970 that they knew would be coming when the model H rolled off the line in 1947. It took 23 years to grow to the place where the John Deere 4020 and International 856 were common large farm tractors of their day.

By the end of the 1970's virtually all tractors had cabs on them for weather protection. Air conditioning was added along with a good sound system and lighting for night work. Today with the air ride seats, satellite guidance and auto steer, I can use my tractor as an office or post on Yappi while riding around in circles.

You know how many times I said auto steer will never work and I kept using foam markers as my preferred means of guiding my sprayer through the field? Then one day I decided to stop fighting change, and just enjoy the ride wherever government grants and carrots offered take me.
 

ProV1

Well-known member
Electric vehicles seem to have a shorter mileage range than most gasoline vehicles and then to recharge or in the case of gas refuel the time needed is much different. OK I am traveling on vacation with an electric car and running low after only a short driving time because I was driving in the dark (lights on) and had to run heat and defrost because of cold temps. all these things shorten driving range. Now I stop for a rest at a large hotel and I and my vehicle get recharged. How is there going to be enough power to charge all the electric vehicles at these hotels at the same time?
Jesus Christ. And you people complain about Biden.
 

said_aouita

Well-known member
Electric vehicles seem to have a shorter mileage range than most gasoline vehicles and then to recharge or in the case of gas refuel the time needed is much different. OK I am traveling on vacation with an electric car and running low after only a short driving time because I was driving in the dark (lights on) and had to run heat and defrost because of cold temps. all these things shorten driving range. Now I stop for a rest at a large hotel and I and my vehicle get recharged. How is there going to be enough power to charge all the electric vehicles at these hotels at the same time?
Same way they do it up North during the cold months. Duh'

alas52283.jpeg
 

y2h

Well-known member
An all electric car that taps into a source provided via an inground rail system similar to city buses overhead lines makes the most sense to me. Outfit vehicles with power meeters that measure the wattage collected. You could charge a smaller battery pack while running on the rails and to make turns or short trips off the main lines you would have a modest battery backup capable of say 100 miles. This allows for the reduced need for batteries, energy lost in conversion from supplied electricity converted to stored electricity then back to supplied energy to the motor when needed. Also gives us more time before required upgrades to residential infrastructure.

RIGHT NOW, LIKE IT OR NOT, IT APPEARS ALL ELECTRIC VEHICLES ARE ON THE HORIZON.
They are a fraction of the market. Decades away from being the dominant form of transportation.
 

y2h

Well-known member
You can charge a vehicle on a 20 amp circuit and get about 25% battery charge in 6 hours (depending on battery size, etc). That all works out to about 2kw per hour.

For reference, a baseboard electric heater uses about 1.5 kw per hour.

If the range on the vehicle is 240 miles, and you drive 40 miles a day, you only need to run the charger 8 hours roughly every other day to top it off.

If everyone in the neighborhood has to drop in a 50amp super charger, then there would need to be upgrades.
What does half asss charging do to the life of the battery?
 

y2h

Well-known member
No. They want to profit from abusing power, and they see this as a sure thing. The eventual outcome is anticipated, a “solution” is invented to address an exaggerated problem, and there’s only one control group, so they can never be proven wrong. “At least we tried”, they will say in 50 years.
Its the same reason for the Covid nonsense. Masks dont work, heck the vaccine isnt all that effective but they can CYA and say hey we did something...
 

y2h

Well-known member
I am not against electric vehicles, but I do have questions on how effective they are in cold weather. Eventually charging time will come down, there is some inventor out there who will figure out how to charge in a short period of time.
I dont think anyone is against them per say, the opposition comes from them being the only option like all the green nonsense.
 

Cleatmark

Well-known member
The govt. has decided they are coming. The problem is there isn't enough power being generated for all electric vehicles. some serious infrastructure changes will need to be made. once that happens, if ever, the serious environmental crap happens.
 
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