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  #1  
Old 12-01-11, 08:22 AM
Colt 17 24 Colt 17 24 is offline
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Cloverleaf asks for a state takeover.

Cloverleaf asks state to take over financial operations


WESTFIELD TWP. — Unable to produce a plan for a balanced budget by the end of the academic year, Cloverleaf Schools is asking the state to take over financial operations.

The school board unanimously passed a resolution Monday night to ask the state to place the district on fiscal emergency, the third and final tier of the state’s categorization of districts in financial trouble.


Daryl Kubilus

If the request is approved, a state-appointed five-member board would be in charge of Cloverleaf’s finances within 15 days.

Cloverleaf’s elected school board still would make decisions affecting policy.

After almost eight years on fiscal watch, the second tier, Superintendent Daryl Kubilus said this year is the first time the district has been unable to come up with a way to balance the budget by the end of the fiscal year.

“We’ve done some amazing things with limited resources,” Kubilus said. “The thought of tearing some of this down and going to state minimums is devastating to me as an educator.”

The district is facing a $580,000 deficit by the end of June 2012 and a $2.6 million hole in 2013, he said.

When faced with previous deficits, Kubilus said, the board was able to make cuts that sustained the financial picture in the short term.

“At this point in time, we have cut so much that my fear is that what makes a Cloverleaf education is going to be compromised,” Kubilus said.

Over the last few years, he said, $4 million has been cut from the budget, including more than 50 staff members and several extracurricular activities. Students do not go on field trips that do not have an outside funding source.

Administrators are in the second year of a two-year pay freeze, Kubilus said. Teachers took a step and base salary freeze this school year and a health care concession that saved the district $700,000.

For each of the last three years, the district has borrowed about $1 million in January to be able to pay its staff, Kubilus said.

He added the loans, which were paid back annually, cost the district an extra $5,000 in fees each year.

The district again will borrow $1.3 million from a bank this January, Kubilus said, but it won’t be enough.

Districts on fiscal emergency are able to borrow interest-free from the state’s fiscal stabilization fund, Kubilus said, a major reason why Cloverleaf is asking to be bumped up a tier.

“When you borrow money, you have to pay it back,” he said.

The district has asked the community for support several times, most recently last month when voters defeated a 6.5-mil levy 4,627 votes to 2,889, according to official election results. The tax would have brought in $3 million a year for 10 years and cost the owner of a $100,000 home $204.75 a year.

Kubilus said the issue is not necessarily a lack of support from the community, but more a reflection of the times.

“School levies are one of the few times they can make a choice about how they can spend their money,” Kubilus said. “I think people are hurting right now and that affected us at the ballot.”

He said he should know this month whether the state will place the district on fiscal emergency. The label occasionally is forced on districts with bad financial situations, Kubilus said, but Cloverleaf officials decided to alert the state ahead of not being able to provide a balanced budget.

The five-member board that would make financial decisions for the district would include three local members, but all would be state-appointed.

Kubilus said he does not know what kind of cuts the board could make, but state minimums are a reality.

“Cloverleaf has never been about minimums,” he said. “Excellent school districts aren’t about minimums.”
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  #2  
Old 12-01-11, 09:30 AM
tallmadge H2 dad tallmadge H2 dad is offline
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Tallmadge will buy your turf field for $580,000

In all seriousness, this is no laughing matter. Things do get better though...look at Akron Springfield who had the state take over about 5 years ago...now, they just broke ground on their brand new high school.
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  #3  
Old 12-01-11, 10:44 AM
Colt 17 24 Colt 17 24 is offline
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Do you guys need a running back? j/k The boosters paid cash for our turf but, I have no idea what happens next. Other than worrying about my grandson and the teachers who will be affected plus my other grandson is at Kent getting a teaching degree....looks dire.
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Old 12-01-11, 11:10 AM
On The Money On The Money is offline
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Sad news. Hopefully this will garner some support for the next attempt at a levy for Cloverleaf. Folks don't realize what happens to their home values when things like this happen. Is a family going to buy a house in a district where the state just took over the schools? Many will look to buy elsewhere.
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  #5  
Old 12-01-11, 11:19 AM
Colt 17 24 Colt 17 24 is offline
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Cloverleaf has one of the largest school districts in Ohio (area wise) but, other than Westfield it is mostly farm land and those people just don't vote for levies.
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  #6  
Old 12-06-11, 06:28 PM
COLTCOUNTRY COLTCOUNTRY is offline
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Colt don't just blame the farmers. There are a lot of parents who vote no. This is a sad situation. It will be interesting to see where PTP ends up. Lets hope we dont go to $600+ per sport. Also, I could see HS busing being cut. Beyond that, you're looking at 40-50 kids in a class. The only way out of fiscal emergency will be new money. So get off your a## Cloverleaf and vote yes.
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  #7  
Old 12-07-11, 07:53 AM
Colt 17 24 Colt 17 24 is offline
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I think the boosters should be getting fundraisers ready now to help defray the $600.
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  #8  
Old 01-12-12, 06:14 PM
Recruiter Recruiter is offline
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Offered to coach for free they showed no interest every bit helps
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  #9  
Old 04-25-12, 09:42 AM
Colt 17 24 Colt 17 24 is offline
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http://medinagazette.northcoastnow.c...cutting-block/


More cuts....looks like some teachers are leaving.
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Old 05-02-12, 01:10 PM
Colt 17 24 Colt 17 24 is offline
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WESTFIELD TWP. — Cloverleaf Schools Superintendent Daryl Kubilus presented the state commission overseeing school district finances with a draft of a recovery plan Tuesday that includes numerous cuts and a 6.9-mill emergency levy.

Paul Marshall, chairman of the financial planning and supervision commission, said Cloverleaf already has made about $5 million in cuts. He added that he’s been part of at least 20 fiscal oversight commissions in the past, and most districts have not made that many cuts before the fiscal recovery process.


Paul Marshall

“Not too many have cut as much as Cloverleaf,” he said.

The school district is in fiscal emergency, and a five-member commission was appointed earlier this year to help it recover.

The school board’s goal, through the recovery process, Marshall said, should be to eliminate the district’s deficit over a two-year period.

Typically, he said, school districts in fiscal emergency cut as much as they can, then go to the voters for revenue.

In November 2011, voters defeated a 6.5-mill emergency levy that would have brought in about $3 million a year for operating expenses. It would have cost the owner of a $100,000 home $204.75 a year for 10 years. The proposed 6.9-mill levy for the November ballot would raise about $3.3 million.

The recovery plan must be submitted to the state superintendent June 6, but it is expected to be revised annually, Marshall said.

Marshall recommended the board cut about half the deficit, and then ask voters for the other half. He said the board must cut another $250,000 to $300,000 in order to meet that standard.

Cloverleaf has an estimated $677,007 deficit for fiscal year 2012 and about a $2.9 million projected deficit for fiscal year 2013, according to its five-year financial forecast.

“I don’t want to be too negative,” Marshall said. “But we still need to do some work.”

One of the proposed cuts would be to change the middle school concept to a junior high concept. Kubilus stressed research shows the middle school concept, which uses a team teaching approach, is better for kids’ social, emotional and academic development, but it does cost more money.

Cuts listed in the recovery plan include:

• Three coaching positions, saving $12,493.

• Converting to the junior high concept would cut five classroom teachers, saving $411,097, between fiscal year 2013 and 2014.

• Not replacing the high school principal, who is retiring, and having two co-principals, saving $135,557.

• Cutting 4.5 high school teachering positions, saving $295,662.

• Cutting one elementary school teacher, saving $65,000.

Other proposals include cutting the inter-office courier, performing plowing and salting in-house, eliminating coffee pots and microwaves at the high and middle schools, and dropping one bus route.

If the proposed emergency levy fails in November, Kubilus listed several more cuts, including high school busing and closing buildings in the evening.

Kubilus said the board is definitely not considering cutting busing to within a two-mile radius for younger students because of a lack of sidewalks and the proximity of U.S. Route 224, which has a speed limit of 60 mph, to the schools.

“God forbid a first-grader would try crossing 224,” he said.

The commission’s next meeting is 11 a.m. May 24 in the high school band room.

Contact Kiera Manion-Fischer at 330-721-4049 or kfischer@medina-gazette.com.
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  #11  
Old 05-03-12, 11:09 AM
COLTCOUNTRY COLTCOUNTRY is offline
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The good news is they are not recommending raising PTP.
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  #12  
Old 06-29-12, 08:16 AM
spartan71 spartan71 is offline
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PTP is stupid... here in Springfield, they realized they were losing more money from kids leaving the district thru open enrolment or relocating totally, taking their state tax dollars with them because of PTP, than it was providing the district in PTP fees collected, not to mention the sad state it put our athletics in.... It is a major mistake and will bring down your athletic department but the right people have to realize it or it wont be changed.
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  #13  
Old 06-29-12, 05:13 PM
COLTCOUNTRY COLTCOUNTRY is offline
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Spartan, the 'Leaf has had PTP for years. Its kind of a way of life. The proble is when you get $300 plus per sport and no family limit. Then people flock. You are correct. If you raise it too high, the kids leave and take their state foundation moeny with them, approx. $6000. How high was it at Springfield?
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