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  #1  
Old 02-15-17, 11:26 PM
lovesallsports lovesallsports is offline
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Best youth club coaches in the area

Let's open an honest discussion about who are the best coaches in the area at developing players.
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  #2  
Old 02-16-17, 12:20 PM
Hoosier Parent Hoosier Parent is offline
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YEAH! Harmless enough
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  #3  
Old 02-16-17, 01:42 PM
Upper 90 Upper 90 is offline
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I thought the way OE did their college info this year was pretty neat. It indicated years at OE, other clubs, let the players give shout outs to past coaches, etc.

http://www.ohioelite.com/home/930644.html
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  #4  
Old 02-17-17, 11:19 AM
Hoosier Parent Hoosier Parent is offline
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I'd put Janelle Fritschie, formerly of CUSA, now with DPA and NWA up there with anybody in terms of technical development for the ages U10-U14. For a small club (CUSA) she developed a lot of girls who went to National League and ECNL rosters, and several girls who went on to college (Really have no clue what level, that was before our time).

I know there can be a lot of OE vs CUP vitriol on here but what Doug Bracken and Tim Lesiak do with the girls at OE has been impressive.
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  #5  
Old 02-17-17, 12:05 PM
Gr8tS0ccr Gr8tS0ccr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Upper 90 View Post
I thought the way OE did their college info this year was pretty neat. It indicated years at OE, other clubs, let the players give shout outs to past coaches, etc.

http://www.ohioelite.com/home/930644.html
Completely agree.
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  #6  
Old 02-17-17, 12:21 PM
Gr8tS0ccr Gr8tS0ccr is offline
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There are good coaches at a lot of the clubs in Cincinnati specifically. I would put these clubs near the top of the list when it comes to "Development Focus":

OE - Love them or hate them, they focus on development
WCSA - A few great coaches at this club, and a few not so great. Girls side better than boys from a coaching standpoint
Alliance - A few really good coaches here, depending on age and gender
CUP - This is VERY hit or miss. Definitely some top notch coaches, but also some very average coaches that have very talented kids (ie. they win despite the coaching, but aren't being "developed") on both boys and girls side.
KHA - Same thing - Depends on gender and age. Some that are great, but others that aren't so good.
TFA - Still a couple of very good trainers at TFA
FOSC - Same as TFA

Beyond that, it goes from average to really bad in a hurry. There are a ton of small clubs that frankly are really just rec teams that pay a lot of money to wear nice uniforms and play with the same group of friends every season. There are some good coaches sprinkled in at the smaller/niche clubs, but a whole lot of bad ones too.
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  #7  
Old 02-17-17, 01:08 PM
Empty CUP Empty CUP is offline
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In order

Lesiak, Bracken, Fisher, Tiff Roberts, Sievering.

The above posts assessment of CUP is spot on. 2 CUP Coaches in particular are way overrated simply because of W-L record. I believe Fisher is way under utilized at CUP. He's fantastic. Really an amazing coach.
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  #8  
Old 02-17-17, 01:28 PM
Gr8tS0ccr Gr8tS0ccr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Empty CUP View Post
In order

Lesiak, Bracken, Fisher, Tiff Roberts, Sievering.

The above posts assessment of CUP is spot on. 2 CUP Coaches in particular are way overrated simply because of W-L record. I believe Fisher is way under utilized at CUP. He's fantastic. Really an amazing coach.
I tried to avoid naming names (good or bad) as it seems to bring out the worst in this crowd, and I am not trying to disparage anyone. I agree on Kurt being a great coach/trainer. Missing quite a few good coaches though, if that is your full list. If that is your top 5, who else cracks your top 10 and why?
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  #9  
Old 02-17-17, 01:56 PM
Empty CUP Empty CUP is offline
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I know names will bring out the haters, but those to me from what I've seen are the top. I think we have a great pool of coaching talent in the area. But if someone asked me (and they do) who the best coaches around are, those 5 are on the top of my list. I'll refrain from naming the low quality or over rated ones. I really think you would have to be a short sighted jack a** not to recognize the 5 I listed as exceptionally high caliber trainers/coaches maybe not everyone's top 5 but to dismiss their quality would be suspect.

But clearly that's just my opinion. Though I really try and stay objective.
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  #10  
Old 02-17-17, 01:59 PM
lovesallsports lovesallsports is offline
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Best youth club coaches in the area

I think it all depends on your own personal experience. I think some of the top coaches at CUP have done an awesome job developing players. Look at the whole U15 Gold team this year. BP has had them for most of their lives and that team has had 4 National Team players on it. Have to give him some credit. I think if you talk to the girls they also each have their own opinion about what is good and what is not and a lot of it is what they are used to. Most of the girls coming up through the CUP program now at the U13 and above are really good all around developed players. I don't know that much about OE but don't see how you can say they develop players. Those coaches you list get the kids at the oldest ages and then it is mostly refining their skills and learning the game better. Most of the developing occurs between 8-14.
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  #11  
Old 02-17-17, 02:13 PM
Gr8tS0ccr Gr8tS0ccr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesallsports View Post
I think it all depends on your own personal experience. I think some of the top coaches at CUP have done an awesome job developing players. Look at the whole U15 Gold team this year. BP has had them for most of their lives and that team has had 4 National Team players on it. Have to give him some credit. I think if you talk to the girls they also each have their own opinion about what is good and what is not and a lot of it is what they are used to. Most of the girls coming up through the CUP program now at the U13 and above are really good all around developed players. I don't know that much about OE but don't see how you can say they develop players. Those coaches you list get the kids at the oldest ages and then it is mostly refining their skills and learning the game better. Most of the developing occurs between 8-14.
Well, remember, I didn't name names...

Those coaches aren't the only ones at OE. They have others, they have a solid curriculum for their youth teams, so I do think they develop players. Also, development doesn't stop at 14 (or start at 8), so the ones ECup mentioned are very good at developing talent from 15-19 and I agree they are good coaches. I would put Bobby P on my list of top coaches, and he clearly has other talents he uses to bring talent to their club. Some of those around him, not so much. For me, as a parent, I want my coach to have my kids best interests in mind in every decision they make. If they make decisions based on what is best for the "team" first, players second, then I question their commitment to development of players. That might mean that they should be on a lower team, or maybe move to another club. A quality coach is willing to give that advice for the betterment of a player and their future.
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  #12  
Old 02-17-17, 04:38 PM
Hoosier Parent Hoosier Parent is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesallsports View Post
I think it all depends on your own personal experience. I think some of the top coaches at CUP have done an awesome job developing players. Look at the whole U15 Gold team this year. BP has had them for most of their lives and that team has had 4 National Team players on it. Have to give him some credit. I think if you talk to the girls they also each have their own opinion about what is good and what is not and a lot of it is what they are used to. Most of the girls coming up through the CUP program now at the U13 and above are really good all around developed players. I don't know that much about OE but don't see how you can say they develop players. Those coaches you list get the kids at the oldest ages and then it is mostly refining their skills and learning the game better. Most of the developing occurs between 8-14.
Don't want to disparage any coaches at CUP. I know 3 girls on the 01 team that are former CUSA girls. I know most of the girls from OE 2001 ECNL originated from other clubs.

I don't think I can credit or discredit Bracken or Lesiak for the development of the girls from 8-14 (DOn't know what ages they coach), but the development I've seen in the girls I know from the beginning of the year are pretty impressive.

As far as development from ages 8-14, I think you big club guys are blowing smoke out your @$$es. There are lots of great coaches at smaller clubs that don't get recognized. Take a poll of any National League or ECNL team and I bet more played U12 and under at another club.
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  #13  
Old 02-17-17, 05:07 PM
Gr8tS0ccr Gr8tS0ccr is offline
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I have been around a long time. I have seen a lot of coaches, good and bad. Just telling you what my experience has been. There are good coaches in some smaller clubs, but not many.
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  #14  
Old 02-18-17, 09:12 AM
Empty CUP Empty CUP is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesallsports View Post
I think it all depends on your own personal experience. I think some of the top coaches at CUP have done an awesome job developing players. Look at the whole U15 Gold team this year. BP has had them for most of their lives and that team has had 4 National Team players on it. Have to give him some credit. I think if you talk to the girls they also each have their own opinion about what is good and what is not and a lot of it is what they are used to. Most of the girls coming up through the CUP program now at the U13 and above are really good all around developed players. I don't know that much about OE but don't see how you can say they develop players. Those coaches you list get the kids at the oldest ages and then it is mostly refining their skills and learning the game better. Most of the developing occurs between 8-14.
CUP has an instant advantage because we have the largest talent pool to pull players from. I've always been impressed with what OE can do with so few teams, at the younger ages. At the old U12 and below, it has been 8-12+ teams at CU, the same at Hammer and usually just 2, sometimes just 1 at OE. Numbers alone say they are going to have to add more kids from other clubs as they get older to stay competitive. Chances of getting 14-18 high caliber kids out of a pool of 20-25 is pretty low. They keep the top kids they have developed on the ECNL and add better players from around the city or neighboring states.

As for what those older age coaches have done, if you don't think they are making drastic improvements to already solid players at U14 and up,you're not paying attention. There is a reason at ID camps coaches tell girls if they are not on one, to find an ECNL team to hone their skill. Same reason Rossi left her club up North and is playing for an ECNL team her last year of Club. Direct Coaching, and playing against the best coached.
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  #15  
Old 02-20-17, 09:13 AM
Rohbino Rohbino is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Empty CUP View Post
There is a reason at ID camps coaches tell girls if they are not on one, to find an ECNL team to hone their skill. Same reason Rossi left her club up North and is playing for an ECNL team her last year of Club. Direct Coaching, and playing against the best coached.
Isn't Rossi rostered to Indiana Fire, aka Carmel? If so it is likely she is what the ECNL terms as a "Discovery Player", aka glorified guest player. It wouldn't make sense for her to train and play with Indiana Fire. Akron is 4 1/2 to 5 hours from Indianapolis and would make that not feasible.

Rossi plays primarily with The Ambassadors- a club in northern Summit County. The reason that she went to that club is because her old team at CFC has pretty much fallen apart.

I'm skeptical but I don't believe that playing games for only 5 or 6 months in the ECNL (games as opposed to training) is going to appreciably hone her skill set vs only playing with The Ambassadors during that same period. Methinks that the greater beneficiary from the deal will be Carmel. A future college teammate of Rossi's plays for them and probably aided in getting her to play in some games for them. Indiana picks up a high quality player to make a run in the ECNL "post season." Perhaps Rossi does a small amount of training with the team but common sense would tell you she isn't making the trek from Akron to Indianapolis on a regular basis.
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  #16  
Old 02-20-17, 11:18 AM
Conan73 Conan73 is offline
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The concern I also have about trying to have a discussion about the best club coaches, is we are going to short change a lot of good coaches. As always, the discussion gravitates to CUP and OEA (ECNL). Clearly, CUP is a great program, and the coaching staff is excellent. Also, OEA is great, and no one can dispute the fact that they turn out strong talent. Howevever, there is no way that these two clubs and their respective coaching staffs are all there is.

First, 9% of all high school girls soccer players will play in college, and a little under 3% will play D1 soccer. While these are small percentages, the numbers behind these percentages indicate that these two clubs are not the only route to play in college. The numbers are too big for these clubs alone.

When you examine the backgrounds of the 2017 recruiting class at D1, D2, and D3 (focusing on the top ranked D3 schools), you will find that the majority of the kids come from ECNL, MRL, and National league teams. If you are a player on a team that plays at those levels, the odds are that you can play college soccer somewhere (if you want to). You could be in the 9% of high school soccer players that play in college.

In the Greater Cincinnati area, we have teams from CUP (Gold and Black), KHA (Red and some Blue), OEA (primarily ECNL, but some Academy teams), TFA, Warren County, and CSA that play at the levels mentioned above. Kids from those teams are the ones that are getting recruited.

So, if we are going to talk about best coaches, the list should be broaden to consider the coaches at all of these clubs. More important, it should go beyond the high school age coaches because it is almost impossible for a kid to wake up at 14 years old and decide that she wants to play in college. Identification starts at 11 or 12 years old, and in some rare cases, 13 years old. So, the critical coaches are actually the ones that are developing the elite level player at 11 and 12 years old. For that matter, you really should go to 8 and 9 years old when fundamentals of touch and dribbling are taught.

The clubs and the coaches that have implemented strong youth development and identification programs for pre-12/13 year old players is where the discussion of best coaches should be focused.
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  #17  
Old 02-20-17, 11:39 AM
Hoosier Parent Hoosier Parent is offline
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Originally Posted by Conan73 View Post
The concern I also have about trying to have a discussion about the best club coaches, is we are going to short change a lot of good coaches. As always, the discussion gravitates to CUP and OEA (ECNL). Clearly, CUP is a great program, and the coaching staff is excellent. Also, OEA is great, and no one can dispute the fact that they turn out strong talent. Howevever, there is no way that these two clubs and their respective coaching staffs are all there is.

First, 9% of all high school girls soccer players will play in college, and a little under 3% will play D1 soccer. While these are small percentages, the numbers behind these percentages indicate that these two clubs are not the only route to play in college. The numbers are too big for these clubs alone.

When you examine the backgrounds of the 2017 recruiting class at D1, D2, and D3 (focusing on the top ranked D3 schools), you will find that the majority of the kids come from ECNL, MRL, and National league teams. If you are a player on a team that plays at those levels, the odds are that you can play college soccer somewhere (if you want to). You could be in the 9% of high school soccer players that play in college.

In the Greater Cincinnati area, we have teams from CUP (Gold and Black), KHA (Red and some Blue), OEA (primarily ECNL, but some Academy teams), TFA, Warren County, and CSA that play at the levels mentioned above. Kids from those teams are the ones that are getting recruited.

So, if we are going to talk about best coaches, the list should be broaden to consider the coaches at all of these clubs. More important, it should go beyond the high school age coaches because it is almost impossible for a kid to wake up at 14 years old and decide that she wants to play in college. Identification starts at 11 or 12 years old, and in some rare cases, 13 years old. So, the critical coaches are actually the ones that are developing the elite level player at 11 and 12 years old. For that matter, you really should go to 8 and 9 years old when fundamentals of touch and dribbling are taught.

The clubs and the coaches that have implemented strong youth development and identification programs for pre-12/13 year old players is where the discussion of best coaches should be focused.
I think all that was mentioned in some posts listed above.
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  #18  
Old 02-21-17, 03:48 PM
buckshooter5 buckshooter5 is offline
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Lovesallsports, Please read below

I think it all depends on your own personal experience. I think some of the top coaches at CUP have done an awesome job developing players. Look at the whole U15 Gold team this year. BP has had them for most of their lives and that team has had 4 National Team players on it

Problem Number 1
How do players develop when all they have ever seen is one coach , one style of play ? always doing the exact same thing over and over again.

More of a set routine instead of making decisions ! Development is learning the game and making decisions, teach the kids how to make decisions !

Learning complicated routines IS NOT DEVELOPMENT ~ !
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Old 02-21-17, 08:10 PM
lovesallsports lovesallsports is offline
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I am sure they do more than just routines. Most of playing is making split second decisions or can you only learn how to do that in the ECNL? I am sure these kids are exposed to different coaches in their club and outside of the club. I have watched this team and different teams from this club a few times and some of those kids are the most technical kids I have seen.
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Old 02-21-17, 08:56 PM
Reynaldo2000 Reynaldo2000 is offline
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I think a better discussion to have, prior to this one, is what makes a great youth coach? It would be interesting to see what all of us say before we start making judgments.......I am not sure we are all using the same criteria.

I also worry that some are rating these coaches without adequate evidence. Have you seen the coach train a team day in and day out throughout a season? Do you know if they build relationships with players beyond your own daughter? Do they focus on player development or on wins and losses? Do they know the game and are they a good teacher of the game? Do they know how to develop a thematic training session or are their practices a smorgasborg of activities? Can they make game time adjustments? And on and on.....
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Old 02-21-17, 11:30 PM
Philly_Cat Philly_Cat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckshooter5 View Post
Lovesallsports, Please read below

I think it all depends on your own personal experience. I think some of the top coaches at CUP have done an awesome job developing players. Look at the whole U15 Gold team this year. BP has had them for most of their lives and that team has had 4 National Team players on it

Problem Number 1
How do players develop when all they have ever seen is one coach , one style of play ? always doing the exact same thing over and over again.

More of a set routine instead of making decisions ! Development is learning the game and making decisions, teach the kids how to make decisions !

Learning complicated routines IS NOT DEVELOPMENT ~ !
I've heard you say this about players over and over again (accept ECNL players). In what world do you think any top program, regardless of the program, has a bunch of robots? You are not competing at the highest of levels IN ANY SPORT if you don't have a high level of understanding of how the game works. You must have a high level of both physical and mental skills to compete at the top levels. Excelling at just one of those will get you by in the average competitive levels of a sport, and having just one will make you one of the best at the rec level. But at the top levels you need both. You bash any non-ECNL player/coach/team/club as if no one associated with them has both the physical and mental skill combination. But to compete on the national level and be able to move on and play in college or the pros shows that they do have those skills, no matter what your hateraid brain fails to acknowledge.

I have a kid that plays on one of the top teams in the area and competes on the national level. My kid isn't part of one of your coveted organizations. I know for a fact those kids are not just being taught the physical skills needed to compete, but also the mental skills. While their team may beat most of the teams they face every season, I never look at those teams and think "Those coaches suck. They aren't even teaching their kids how to mentally play the game." See, because unlike you, I recognize that for any team to be competing at the top level you know damn well they are. To think the top teams aren't mentally learning the game is just plain ignorant, but from your many comments on this site, ignorance seems par for the course with you.

Last edited by Philly_Cat; 02-21-17 at 11:44 PM..
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  #22  
Old 02-22-17, 09:19 AM
Gr8tS0ccr Gr8tS0ccr is offline
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Originally Posted by Philly_Cat View Post
I've heard you say this about players over and over again (accept ECNL players). In what world do you think any top program, regardless of the program, has a bunch of robots? You are not competing at the highest of levels IN ANY SPORT if you don't have a high level of understanding of how the game works. You must have a high level of both physical and mental skills to compete at the top levels. Excelling at just one of those will get you by in the average competitive levels of a sport, and having just one will make you one of the best at the rec level. But at the top levels you need both. You bash any non-ECNL player/coach/team/club as if no one associated with them has both the physical and mental skill combination. But to compete on the national level and be able to move on and play in college or the pros shows that they do have those skills, no matter what your hateraid brain fails to acknowledge.

I have a kid that plays on one of the top teams in the area and competes on the national level. My kid isn't part of one of your coveted organizations. I know for a fact those kids are not just being taught the physical skills needed to compete, but also the mental skills. While their team may beat most of the teams they face every season, I never look at those teams and think "Those coaches suck. They aren't even teaching their kids how to mentally play the game." See, because unlike you, I recognize that for any team to be competing at the top level you know damn well they are. To think the top teams aren't mentally learning the game is just plain ignorant, but from your many comments on this site, ignorance seems par for the course with you.
Man, you guys take the bait so easily. Just ignore it, and maybe the conversation can be a relevant one. I like the question above: What makes a good youth coach? Also, what age are we considering "Youth"? Here is a very simplistic take:

Birth - 6 - Parents are the biggest influence...get them to like the game, and enjoy air going in and out of the lungs with a ball at the feet.
6-9 - This is CRITICAL individual skill development time, mostly because they are at an age where they won't understand sharing the ball, working with teammates, etc...it is a cognitive development fact (but there are exceptions to every rule) - The best Youth coach for this age is full of energy, passion for soccer, good demonstrator, positive always, makes them want to come back to the next session because they had so much fun.
10-12 - Youth coach has to still have qualities of the 6-9 coach, but starts to implement more team concepts (but does NOT lose focus on the individual player first). Positive, and let's them make mistakes. Players are fully aware they have teammates at this stage and how to work with them. We need our very best youth coaches at these ages, but we don't have them there.
13-15 - Youth coach still has the same qualities of the younger coaches, still keeps the individual players first, but begins to instill team competitiveness, team concepts are big part of the development cycle at this age.
16-19 - Youth coach should help the player focus on what they have to do to be prepared for the future. This might be College, this might be pro, this might be recreational college team. Either way, teach them to compete, and train. They are learning life lessons on exercise, competition, teamwork, commitment, etc...
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Old 02-22-17, 10:47 AM
Philly_Cat Philly_Cat is offline
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Originally Posted by Gr8tS0ccr View Post
Man, you guys take the bait so easily. Just ignore it, and maybe the conversation can be a relevant one. I like the question above: What makes a good youth coach? Also, what age are we considering "Youth"? Here is a very simplistic take:

Birth - 6 - Parents are the biggest influence...get them to like the game, and enjoy air going in and out of the lungs with a ball at the feet.
6-9 - This is CRITICAL individual skill development time, mostly because they are at an age where they won't understand sharing the ball, working with teammates, etc...it is a cognitive development fact (but there are exceptions to every rule) - The best Youth coach for this age is full of energy, passion for soccer, good demonstrator, positive always, makes them want to come back to the next session because they had so much fun.
10-12 - Youth coach has to still have qualities of the 6-9 coach, but starts to implement more team concepts (but does NOT lose focus on the individual player first). Positive, and let's them make mistakes. Players are fully aware they have teammates at this stage and how to work with them. We need our very best youth coaches at these ages, but we don't have them there.
13-15 - Youth coach still has the same qualities of the younger coaches, still keeps the individual players first, but begins to instill team competitiveness, team concepts are big part of the development cycle at this age.
16-19 - Youth coach should help the player focus on what they have to do to be prepared for the future. This might be College, this might be pro, this might be recreational college team. Either way, teach them to compete, and train. They are learning life lessons on exercise, competition, teamwork, commitment, etc...
That is an excellent synopsis of what is needed at each age. With that said I think almost everyone here will be hard pressed to say who are the best ciaches in the area, due to the fact that to make that determination you would have to be involved with all of these coaches across all the clubs in order to see them in action (not just coaching a game). What people can do is give their own anecdotal evidence based on their personal experiences with some coaches. With that said, CU had one of the best coaches I've seen in charge of their juniors program. Her ability to work with the younglings (3-8 year olds) was hands down the best I have ever seen in any sport. She checkEd all of the boxes you listed for that age and then some. So she would go on my list as one of the best youth coaches in the area.
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Old 02-22-17, 11:19 AM
Hoosier Parent Hoosier Parent is offline
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Originally Posted by Gr8tS0ccr View Post
Here is a very simplistic take:

Birth - 6 - Parents are the biggest influence...get them to like the game, and enjoy air going in and out of the lungs with a ball at the feet.
6-9 - This is CRITICAL individual skill development time, mostly because they are at an age where they won't understand sharing the ball, working with teammates, etc...it is a cognitive development fact (but there are exceptions to every rule) - The best Youth coach for this age is full of energy, passion for soccer, good demonstrator, positive always, makes them want to come back to the next session because they had so much fun.
10-12 - Youth coach has to still have qualities of the 6-9 coach, but starts to implement more team concepts (but does NOT lose focus on the individual player first). Positive, and let's them make mistakes. Players are fully aware they have teammates at this stage and how to work with them. We need our very best youth coaches at these ages, but we don't have them there.
13-15 - Youth coach still has the same qualities of the younger coaches, still keeps the individual players first, but begins to instill team competitiveness, team concepts are big part of the development cycle at this age.
16-19 - Youth coach should help the player focus on what they have to do to be prepared for the future. This might be College, this might be pro, this might be recreational college team. Either way, teach them to compete, and train. They are learning life lessons on exercise, competition, teamwork, commitment, etc...
Nice post
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  #25  
Old 02-22-17, 03:03 PM
SoccerinCincy SoccerinCincy is offline
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I've only experienced 2 clubs, Cincinnati West and KHA. CW was simply an expensive rec team and somewhat of a train wreck. KHA has been excellent. The training is top notch and the coaches seem to really focus on developing players rather than winning at all costs.
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  #26  
Old 02-23-17, 07:57 AM
TheStuff142 TheStuff142 is offline
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Colin Mulaney - boys coach...but he is a tremendous trainer.
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  #27  
Old 02-23-17, 08:34 AM
JB090416 JB090416 is offline
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Josh Howard - girls youth DOC at Warren County. He is a great trainer and does a lot with players that sometimes have little talent.
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  #28  
Old 02-23-17, 12:08 PM
Gr8tS0ccr Gr8tS0ccr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStuff142 View Post
Colin Mulaney - boys coach...but he is a tremendous trainer.
Colin was great...moved to CO.
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  #29  
Old 02-23-17, 04:56 PM
buckshooter5 buckshooter5 is offline
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It is so clear on here that most of you don't have a clue or you are in denial mode.

Teaching players how to play fast (Speed of play) is really hard to do when the kids are making their own decisions, takes a very long time.
That being said, as always let's take the easy way out and shortcut that by telling the players over and over again where to play the ball without thinking about it.

Yes, those teams especially at the youth ages play faster than the majority of the other teams out there and yes they win most of the games, because they play faster and other teams end up chasing.

The parents love it , because it looks great on the field and they are winning games and think the coaches are the best ever !

What a Joke ! Please wake up and smell the coffee !

Look real hard the next time you are at the game and figure out what your team is doing and don't go home angry once you figure it out.
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  #30  
Old 02-27-17, 08:58 AM
coachg coachg is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Empty CUP View Post
There is a reason at ID camps coaches tell girls if they are not on one, to find an ECNL team to hone their skill. Same reason Rossi left her club up North and is playing for an ECNL team her last year of Club. Direct Coaching, and playing against the best coached.
I call BS on this statement.
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