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  #1  
Old 02-01-18, 12:34 AM
pricesoccer17 pricesoccer17 is offline
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Athletic money

What is the average award of athletic money for women’s soccer for Ohio D1 and D2 schools? Public and private?

Last edited by pricesoccer17; 02-01-18 at 09:43 AM..
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Old 02-01-18, 01:10 AM
sportsfanofyear sportsfanofyear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pricesoccer17 View Post
What is the average cost of athletic money for women’s soccer for Ohio D1 and D2 schools? Public and private?
I am not sure I understand your question as worded. "Cost"?

Are you really asking, "What is the average AWARD of athletic money...?"

Since the NCAA allows 13.9 full scholarships for a D1 school (assuming the D1 school fully funds their program) and each of the 13.9 scholarships can be divided into multiple parts. I can't confirm where I heard this fact, but I believe the smallest scholarship allowed is 15%. I am not sure if that is 15% of tuition or 15% of tuition and room/board.

Assuming the % is based off of tuition and room/board, a UC in-state girl can get 15% of $11K Tuition and $11K Room/Board or a total of $3,300 a year plus a monthly stipend in season ($100?).
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Old 02-01-18, 06:40 AM
Hoosier Parent Hoosier Parent is offline
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Maybe this helps a little.

http://www.scholarshipstats.com/soccer.html
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  #4  
Old 02-01-18, 07:42 AM
Irwin20 Irwin20 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sportsfanofyear View Post
I am not sure I understand your question as worded. "Cost"?

Are you really asking, "What is the average AWARD of athletic money...?"

Since the NCAA allows 13.9 full scholarships for a D1 school (assuming the D1 school fully funds their program) and each of the 13.9 scholarships can be divided into multiple parts. I can't confirm where I heard this fact, but I believe the smallest scholarship allowed is 15%. I am not sure if that is 15% of tuition or 15% of tuition and room/board.

Assuming the % is based off of tuition and room/board, a UC in-state girl can get 15% of $11K Tuition and $11K Room/Board or a total of $3,300 a year plus a monthly stipend in season ($100?).
I think the stipend is $150 per semester.
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Old 02-01-18, 08:53 AM
pricesoccer17 pricesoccer17 is offline
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This is about the amount I have been hearing as well. What are most girls receiving? What is a good offer? That doesn’t seem like a great amount in my opinion for a d1 player? Would you rather have $3500 at a D1 school or 12k at a D2 school. We have friends who’s daughter chose a d2 school and she is getting about 30 percent athletic and the same for academic. It’s a private school so more expensive for still... Why are all these ladies around here settling for less money, just to play d1? A lot of my daughters friends say they got full rides for d1 schools but from what I am hearing that’s not close to true.

Looking at the future for mine, what how does UC, OSU, Miam, UD and OU compare?
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Old 02-01-18, 09:23 AM
PantherDad PantherDad is offline
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When a school decision is based solely on the cost the chance of your Daughter staying at that school all 4 years will be a lot less!
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Old 02-01-18, 09:27 AM
pricesoccer17 pricesoccer17 is offline
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I agree. However, I think along with loving the school, financials and playing time is important for those who really want to play and have less debt. I’ve told
My daughter, you really only have a few years left to play so pick somewhere you love if you can’t play but will play and enjoy it if you can. Of course you don’t pick only for cost but to be in debt for 10 years after graduation is not ideal.

I also think picking a school because it’s D1 and looks good to others, is kind of silly. I can’t believe every son and daughter wants a large school and is truely getting the best fit financially and every other way, as some of the club websites tote. No way does every high level player fit the same d1 big school mold. I mean some aren’t getting any money and didn’t even look around much. I’m not getting that mentality. I wonder how many will transfer.

Financials are a big consideration for us. Of course they need to like to school but athletic
Money and academic are equally as important and if she can avoid no debit we’ll then, she may pick a school she likes slightly less than one with less money.

Last edited by pricesoccer17; 02-01-18 at 09:37 AM..
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Old 02-01-18, 09:36 AM
IcyCoolDevil IcyCoolDevil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pricesoccer17 View Post
This is about the amount I have been hearing as well. What are most girls receiving? What is a good offer? That doesn’t seem like a great amount in my opinion for a d1 player? Would you rather have $3500 at a D1 school or 12k at a D2 school. We have friends who’s daughter chose a d2 school and she is getting about 30 percent athletic and the same for academic. It’s a private school so more expensive for still... Why are all these ladies around here settling for less money, just to play d1? A lot of my daughters friends say they got full rides for d1 schools but from what I am hearing that’s not close to true.

Looking at the future for mine, what how does UC, OSU, Miam, UD and OU compare?
Do all you can to help your daughter score a 29 on her ACT and it won't matter.

If she wants playing time find a school with a less than .500 record, but a coach that you really like! Don't worry about what Division it is.

My daughter didn't want to be committed to the year-round schedule of the D1 programs, but wanted to play. Went to a D3 school and played all but four minutes throughout four years. She holds records for games played and starts and could not have had a more enjoyable experience.
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Old 02-01-18, 09:41 AM
pricesoccer17 pricesoccer17 is offline
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Originally Posted by IcyCoolDevil View Post
Do all you can to help your daughter score a 29 on her ACT and it won't matter.

If she wants playing time find a school with a less than .500 record, but a coach that you really like! Don't worry about what Division it is.

My daughter didn't want to be committed to the year-round schedule of the D1 programs, but wanted to play. Went to a D3 school and played all but four minutes throughout four years. She holds records for games played and starts and could not have had a more enjoyable experience.
Excellent choice! Thank you for this information.
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  #10  
Old 02-01-18, 12:22 PM
Hoosier Parent Hoosier Parent is offline
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There's a lot of options. Speaking from experience, what girls want entering the recruiting process and what the want when they commit can be completely different. Who knows it might change even after her freshman year.

When you consider academic needs as much as athletic needs, it complicates things even more.

I would argue the most important thing you can stress at the early stage is academic as well as athletic development. a 34 ACT will open up a lot of doors.
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Old 02-01-18, 01:14 PM
pricesoccer17 pricesoccer17 is offline
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oh no doubts a 34 ACT would be a dream.
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  #12  
Old 02-01-18, 01:53 PM
Conan73 Conan73 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pricesoccer17 View Post
I agree. However, I think along with loving the school, financials and playing time is important for those who really want to play and have less debt. I’ve told
My daughter, you really only have a few years left to play so pick somewhere you love if you can’t play but will play and enjoy it if you can. Of course you don’t pick only for cost but to be in debt for 10 years after graduation is not ideal.

I also think picking a school because it’s D1 and looks good to others, is kind of silly. I can’t believe every son and daughter wants a large school and is truely getting the best fit financially and every other way, as some of the club websites tote. No way does every high level player fit the same d1 big school mold. I mean some aren’t getting any money and didn’t even look around much. I’m not getting that mentality. I wonder how many will transfer.

Financials are a big consideration for us. Of course they need to like to school but athletic
Money and academic are equally as important and if she can avoid no debit we’ll then, she may pick a school she likes slightly less than one with less money.
For D1, there are only 4 sports that are considered fully funded -- meaning they provide full scholarship, not partials. Those sports are men's football, men's & women's basketball, and women's volleyball. All other sports provide partials. So, it is highly unlikely that a soccer player will get a full ride from an athletic scholarship alone.

As has been pointed out, a player that has a strong ACT score and good grades is in a better position. Depending on the school, those players will get around 20-40% athletic money, and then get academic money on top. In some cases, they may qualify for financial aid. This tends to be how they approach getting most or all of their tuition paid for.

There's a lot of stuff that should go into where a young girls ends up. How much playing time does she expect or desire? Does she want to get on the field right away? Does she want to play for a winning program or a program that has a shot at reaching the NCAA tournament? Does she want a big school, mid-size school, or a small school? How important are academics -- does she want to pursue a rigorous major while playing? How much can she afford? etc....

The answers to these questions should help zero in on whether or not she ends up in D1 (note that D1 has about 3-4 levels of play), D2, or D3
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Old 02-01-18, 02:49 PM
Schmitt Schmitt is offline
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"For D1, there are only 4 sports that are considered fully funded -- meaning they provide full scholarship, not partials. Those sports are men's football, men's & women's basketball, and women's volleyball. All other sports provide partials. So, it is highly unlikely that a soccer player will get a full ride from an athletic scholarship alone. "

I've seen this posted before and its incorrect. I know a girl who has a full scholarship to play soccer (room, board, books). The coach has 14.9 for the entire team. He can portion those out however he sees fit.
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Old 02-01-18, 04:52 PM
Irwin20 Irwin20 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmitt View Post
"For D1, there are only 4 sports that are considered fully funded -- meaning they provide full scholarship, not partials. Those sports are men's football, men's & women's basketball, and women's volleyball. All other sports provide partials. So, it is highly unlikely that a soccer player will get a full ride from an athletic scholarship alone. "

I've seen this posted before and its incorrect. I know a girl who has a full scholarship to play soccer (room, board, books). The coach has 14.9 for the entire team. He can portion those out however he sees fit.
Schmitt, I don't think he's saying a Womans soccer player CANNOT get a full ride just thats its rare.
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  #15  
Old 02-01-18, 05:56 PM
jed the fish show jed the fish show is offline
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If you ask a player's parents while sitting at Sally's HS or Club game, 100% of those parents will say their daughter got a full ride. Too funny.
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Old 02-02-18, 09:53 AM
sportsfanofyear sportsfanofyear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmitt View Post
"For D1, there are only 4 sports that are considered fully funded -- meaning they provide full scholarship, not partials. Those sports are men's football, men's & women's basketball, and women's volleyball. All other sports provide partials. So, it is highly unlikely that a soccer player will get a full ride from an athletic scholarship alone. "

I've seen this posted before and its incorrect. I know a girl who has a full scholarship to play soccer (room, board, books). The coach has 14.9 for the entire team. He can portion those out however he sees fit.
Just a few corrections. NCAA D1 women’s soccer has only 14 full “equivalency” scholarships (not 14.9).

The term "fully funded" when discussing athletic scholarships has to do with whether or not that school's sport team can offer the full amount of athletic scholarships that the particular sport is allowed to offer. Just because a D1 FBS school is allowed to offer 85 full football scholarships does not mean that they have to. If the team is not "fully funded," not only can they have available less than 85 football scholarships, they do not have to offer "full" scholarships either. But, because football is a "head count" sport, they can only offer football athletic scholarships to 85 players (which cannot be combined with another sport, like track).

“Head count” sports do not allow splitting of scholarships but they do not require that scholarships be “full” either. The restriction is that no more than the “head count” limit of players be on an athletic scholarship. For 2017-2018 D1 men, the “head count” sports are Basketball (13) and Football (FBS=85, FCS=63). For D1 women, the “head count” sports are Basketball (15), Gymnastics (12), Tennis (8), and Volleyball (12).

The other college sports, such as soccer, are “equivalency” sports which means awards can be split into partial scholarships in any proportion up to the maximum allowed. For example, in NCAA Division I women’s soccer, a school can allocate a number of partial athletic scholarships equivalent to 14 full scholarships in any proportion among, say, 30 soccer players assuming that the school’s women’s soccer program is “fully funded”.

Because of Title IX and some school’s interpretation being that the number of men athletes and women athletes and scholarships must be exactly equal, more women’s sports are “fully funded” especially if they have a football team because that is potentially 85 men’s scholarships that must be countered equally by women’s scholarships.

I have heard the Ohio State wrestling coach talk about how he recruits for the Ohio State women’s rowing team because his wrestling team’s existence depends on the success and existence of the women’s rowing team due to Title IX.

I think this webpage does a good job explaining this information - http://www.scholarshipstats.com/ncaalimits.html

One other thing to note, the athletic scholarship amount can change yearly at the end of the spring semester/before the start of the fall semester. From my daughter's 4 year experience, no incoming freshmen had a "full" athletic scholarship but some in their senior year had a "full" scholarship. Partly because they earned it and partly because some players did not return for the fall and the coach "spent" the departed player's scholarship on his deserving talent. Adjustments "up" were made to certain players every year on her team just not to every player and some adjustments were not big while some were significant, basically because the player earned it.
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Old 02-02-18, 03:51 PM
jed the fish show jed the fish show is offline
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this.............

One other thing to note, the athletic scholarship amount can change yearly at the end of the spring semester/before the start of the fall semester. From my daughter's 4 year experience, no incoming freshmen had a "full" athletic scholarship but some in their senior year had a "full" scholarship. Partly because they earned it and partly because some players did not return for the fall and the coach "spent" the departed player's scholarship on his deserving talent. Adjustments "up" were made to certain players every year on her team just not to every player and some adjustments were not big while some were significant, basically because the player earned it.


......is the SMARTEST and most realistic view of whats going on in the recruiting world right now. And by recruiting, I do NOT mean Walsh, Badin and Sycamore. I mean COLLEGE recruiting world.
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Old 02-05-18, 09:11 AM
belied dat belied dat is offline
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Originally Posted by sportsfanofyear View Post
Just because a D1 FBS school is allowed to offer 85 full football scholarships does not mean that they have to. If the team is not "fully funded," not only can they have available less than 85 football scholarships, they do not have to offer "full" scholarships either.
Not 100% on this, but thought it was the case, but, isn't it a requirement to have 85 scholarships for FBS? That's why they choose to be in FBS. The scholarships have to be head-count scholarships, cannot be divided.

FCS is 63 and can be divided into fulls or partials.
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Old 02-05-18, 10:59 AM
Conan73 Conan73 is offline
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Originally Posted by belied dat View Post
Not 100% on this, but thought it was the case, but, isn't it a requirement to have 85 scholarships for FBS? That's why they choose to be in FBS. The scholarships have to be head-count scholarships, cannot be divided.

FCS is 63 and can be divided into fulls or partials.
This is from http://www.scholarshipstats.com/ncaalimits.html It should help clarify many of the questions that have been posted.


" NCAA & NJCAA Division III schools do not award athletic scholarships, but they do grant other forms of financial aid that student athletes may qualify for. Assistance to academically gifted student athletes can generally be exempted from counting as athletically based assistance only if the student athlete meets certain grade and/or test score criteria established by the various associations. Athletic scholarships are not awarded for participation in either club or intramural sports at any level.

Why are there fractions? Most NCAA varsity programs are equivalency sports which means awards can be split into partial scholarships in any proportion up to the maximum allowed. For example, an NCAA Division I school can allocate a number of partial athletic scholarships equivalent to 11.7 full scholarships in any proportion among, say, 25 baseball players.

Full scholarships are relatively rare in equivalency sports. An additional caveat is that there is a top limit of the number of athletes that can be awarded even a partial scholarship in an equivalency sport - this limit is referred to as the maximum number of counters. For NCAA I baseball teams the maximum number of counters allowed is 27.

There are fewer NCAA head- count sports than equivalency sports; head count sports mean the stated scholarship limit is absolute, and the number of student athletes receiving awards cannot exceed this number. NCAA I football and basketball are headcount sports as well as a few others noted above. For example, NCAA FBS football schools can have a maximum of 85 players under scholarship during a year. Head count sports generally award a much higher percentage of full scholarships to participants than equivalency sports.

The above numbers are maximums and schools can award less than the limit. Ivy League schools state they do not award scholarships based on athletic ability, but they grant other forms of financial aid as do many other schools. The US Military Academies (Army, Navy, Air Force & Coast Guard) do not award athletic scholarships, but all students receiving an appointment to the academies have their tuition paid in full.

The above limits are annual and apply to the entire team, so incoming student athletes at a four year institution are typically completing for approximately 25% of the maximum available scholarships. "
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Old 02-05-18, 07:41 PM
sportsfanofyear sportsfanofyear is offline
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Originally Posted by belied dat View Post
Not 100% on this, but thought it was the case, but, isn't it a requirement to have 85 scholarships for FBS? That's why they choose to be in FBS. The scholarships have to be head-count scholarships, cannot be divided.
Having 85 players on full scholarships is NOT a requirement. Nearly all FBS schools that are not on NCAA probation give 85 full scholarships. Partly, because players transfer, become ineligible, get into trouble, etc., most schools may start at or close to 85 scholarships in the fall but it's not 100% and not a requirement.

In order to retain FBS membership, schools must meet several requirements:
-FBS schools must have an average home attendance of at least 15,000 (over a rolling two-year period).
-An FBS school must sponsor a minimum of 16 varsity intercollegiate teams (including football), with at least six men's or coeducational teams and at least eight all-female teams.
-Across all sports, each FBS school must offer at least 200 athletic scholarships (or spend at least $4 million on athletic scholarships) per year, and FBS football teams must provide at least 90% of the maximum number of football scholarships (which is 76.5 of the currently allowed 85)

Last edited by sportsfanofyear; 02-06-18 at 06:35 AM..
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Old 02-06-18, 12:09 AM
pricesoccer17 pricesoccer17 is offline
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Is 9k and 12k pretty decent d2 athletic money?
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Old 02-06-18, 07:34 AM
Rohbino Rohbino is offline
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Originally Posted by Conan73 View Post
Ivy League schools state they do not award scholarships based on athletic ability, but they grant other forms of financial aid as do many other schools.
To clarify, you are right that Ivy schools don't offer athletic scholarships. Additionally, there are no academic (merit based) scholarships either. There are no scholarships to Ivies based on any special abilities that a student might have. In short, Ivies don't offer scholarships of any kind. As you mentioned there other forms of financial aid at Ivies but ALL AID IS ENTIRELY NEED-BASED. The need-based aid is made in the form of a grant and does not need to be repaid. Ivies are loath to offer loans. That is not bad since so many students graduate with a lot of debt. Ivies have large endowments and are very generous with grants. There are families with annual incomes of $250K+ that are getting need-based aid at Ivies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pricesoccer17 View Post
Is 9k and 12k pretty decent d2 athletic money?
It sounds more than decent to me. What you need to do is look at the bottom-line after all money is awarded. Some schools with a large overall price tag may not offer as much athletic money but the bottom line may be less that a school with a lower price tag after all is considered. Be reluctant to accept a package in which a lot of the aid is in the form of loans. Loans are loans and you, or your kid, will need to pay the piper.
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Old 02-06-18, 08:47 AM
jed the fish show jed the fish show is offline
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the first thing I mentioned to any family I work with is......BLOCK OUT THE NOISE (idiot, insecure parents blabbing about some exaggerated scholarship total lie) and for families to THINK PERCENTAGE when comparing offer totals, NOT AMOUNT.

PRIVATE D1 college in a big conference could offer a player 100,000k over 4 years, and PUBLIC D1 college in the same big conference could offer same player 60,000k over 4 years..... but the NET (what the player/family owes after graduation) for this same scenario would be the PRIVATE school would have a NET of 100,000k total owed AFTER graduation but the PUBLIC school NET would only be 20,000k total owed AFTER graduation.

(for those a little SLOWER in math, in this scenario the Private college would cost 50k per year, while the Public college would cost 20k per year)

The hilarious thing is how many parents walk around club games screaming how little sally got a 100k offer, when sally is going to be drowned in debt after graduation.

BTW, Private colleges are NOT always more expensive- it was just an example.

And BTW BTW, a lot of times, even though sally might have a bigger debt after graduation, the prestige of the private school COULD mean a bigger entry level salary at her first job after college.

In other words, there are a ZILLION things to consider when making the decision on which offer- NOT simply the total of the offer. dirrrrrrr.

If anyone wants some free guidance in an offer situation, PM me. You are welcome.
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Old 02-06-18, 01:56 PM
pricesoccer17 pricesoccer17 is offline
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Thank you all for the information here. Very appreciated and informative.
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Old 02-07-18, 12:15 PM
Soccer Toe Soccer Toe is offline
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Here is what we used for my daughter:
1) if you decide to give up soccer, is this a school that you would still want to go to. If not, cancel it from the list.
2) does the school have a good academic program that you are interested in?
3) look at the total cost after all scholarships (athletic, academic and grants). We did not factor in loans or work study.
4) is the level of play one that you think that you can succeed in?
5) is the team at least a .500 team?
5) how was in person visit? players? coach?
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