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  #5671  
Old 05-21-18, 06:41 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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I was obsessed with Britney - except when she shaved her head.

I believe a relatively simple question tonight:

In 1947 singer Jack Lawrenece had a very popular number one hit entitled "Linda".

The name "Linda" then soared in popularity. Prior to the song the name "Linda" was chosen by only 5.5% of the parents for their new born girlies. It soared in usage afterwards and that continued for decades. (I know I certainly had a lot of "Lindas" in my schools.)

The song was actually written in 1942 for the young daughter of Jack Lawrence's attorney.

She actually became pretty famous in her own right decades later and a relative of hers had a major role in the wedding of Meghan and Harry on Saturday.

Who is she?

For tonight's listening pleasure a couple of well known and somewhat obscure (if that's possible) tunes from Sir Paul. I know a coupe of you sample some of these; I believe you will be very pleased with "Put It There" and "My Brave Face". Of course, "Jet" rocks your socks off and I first heard "Eleabor Rigby" on a record at a record hop (with live band) when during one of the the band's break it was played as a 45, of course. I thought what the hell was that!? So good!!!!!

Last edited by Bevo; 05-21-18 at 06:51 PM.
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  #5672  
Old 05-21-18, 07:10 PM
Johnstown Benny Johnstown Benny is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
I was obsessed with Britney - except when she shaved her head.

I believe a relatively simple question tonight:

In 1947 singer Jack Lawrenece had a very popular number one hit entitled "Linda".

The name "Linda" then soared in popularity. Prior to the song the name "Linda" was chosen by only 5.5% of the parents for their new born girlies. It soared in usage afterwards and that continued for decades. (I know I certainly had a lot of "Lindas" in my schools.)

The song was actually written in 1942 for the young daughter of Jack Lawrence's attorney.

She actually became pretty famous in her own right decades later and a relative of hers had a major role in the wedding of Meghan and Harry on Saturday.

Who is she?

For tonight's listening pleasure a couple of well known and somewhat obscure (if that's possible) tunes from Sir Paul. I know a coupe of you sample some of these; I believe you will be very pleased with "Put It There" and "My Brave Face". Of course, "Jet" rocks your socks off and I first heard "Eleabor Rigby" on a record at a record hop (with live band) when during one of the the band's break it was played as a 45, of course. I thought what the hell was that!? So good!!!!!
You must be looking for Linda Eastman who was married to Sir Paul. I think we discussed her and her background on a thread several years ago. Speaking of threads, the relative of Linda involved in the royal wedding would be Stella McCartney , Linda's daughter who is a very successful fashion designer and I believe she designed either the wedding dress or another dress Meghan wore after the wedding.


JB
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  #5673  
Old 05-21-18, 07:53 PM
Diva Diva is offline
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Good one, JB. I agree it's probably that Linda. Not the wedding gown designer; must have been someone else in the party.

"When I go to sleep, I never count sheep, I count all the charms about Linda" sang by Frank Sinatra. I heard that song a lot as my father sang it to my sister when we were riding in the car. My dad had a similar voice to Frankie's, but he didn't hold the consonant endings like Frank did that drives me crazy.
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  #5674  
Old 05-21-18, 08:58 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Wow! I always liked Linda Eastman - while many derided her presence.

Yes, Linda's (and Paul's) daughter world renown designer, Stella McCartney designed Markle's dress.

I became a fan of Stella for another reason. Paul was inducted into some hall of fame ( an oversight of some duration, I gather) and Stella came out to accept on behalf of her dad in a t-shirt (an early Stella McCartney creation) that had this printed on it: "'Bout F%$#@*() Time". Backing her dad!
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  #5675  
Old 05-22-18, 09:14 AM
Diva Diva is offline
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"Givenchy wedding dress designed by Clare Waight Keller" was what I've seen regarding the wedding gown. I'm interested to see where it was a Stella McCartney design. I haven't seen that credit.
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  #5676  
Old 05-22-18, 09:16 AM
Diva Diva is offline
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Ok I found it. She wore a Stella to her evening reception.
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  #5677  
Old 05-22-18, 09:17 AM
ohiopup ohiopup is offline
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Happy Birthday today (May 22nd)

Richard Benjamin ~ he's 80 today.


Married to actress Paula Prentiss in 1961, (I had a teenage crush on her
since I saw the movie 'Where the Boys Are').

What is amazing, when you read about all the Hollywood breakups,
they will have been married 57 years come this October 26th.

Richard and Paula... (actually Rich is on the right)


- - - - -

Also birthdays today...

Michael Constantine (91) ~ Played the Father: My Big Fat Greek Wedding
Peter Nero (84) ~ Pianist / I have a few of his albums
Bernie Taupin (68) ~ Lyricist, (famous for his many collaborations with Elton John: i.e. "I Guess That's Why They Call It the Blues")

RIP: Sir Laurence Olivier (would have been 111 today) ~ Heathcliff / and so much more!

:>---

I'm driving a friend over to Dayton this weekend...He's a USAF Vet...He's never been to the Air Force Museum;
we're going to check out the Memphis Bell.

EGA

Last edited by ohiopup; 05-22-18 at 09:59 AM.
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  #5678  
Old 05-22-18, 10:13 AM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Diva - pardon my faux pas.

pup - enjoy that Dayton trip.

Paula Prentis - "Toogles"? Jim Hutton was her beau, right?

Did Michael Constantine play Miccah in The Rifleman and a sherrif in To Kill A Mockignbird?
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  #5679  
Old 05-22-18, 10:48 AM
MontetheCarlo MontetheCarlo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
Diva - pardon my faux pas.

pup - enjoy that Dayton trip.

Paula Prentis - "Toogles"? Jim Hutton was her beau, right?

Did Michael Constantine play Miccah in The Rifleman and a sherrif in To Kill A Mockignbird?
Paul Fixx was Micah in the Rifleman.
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  #5680  
Old 05-22-18, 11:06 AM
ohiopup ohiopup is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
Diva - pardon my faux pas.

pup - enjoy that Dayton trip.

Paula Prentis - "Toogles"? Jim Hutton was her beau, right?

Did Michael Constantine play Miccah in The Rifleman and a sherrif in To Kill A Mockignbird?
Toogles...several early career film co-stars


Paul Fix ... Rifleman sheriff and Judge in TKA Mockingbird


- - -


Frank Overton played the sheriff in TKA Mockingbird...


:>---

EGA
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  #5681  
Old 05-22-18, 12:46 PM
ohiopup ohiopup is offline
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For Diva (etal...)



...People always told me "be careful of what you do"
"And don't go around breaking young girls' hearts"
And mother always told me "be careful of who you love
And be careful of what you do, 'cause the lie becomes the truth"...

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Read more: Michael Jackson - Billy Jean Lyrics | MetroLyrics




Bill Bailey -1955- The Apollo - (at the 2:00 mark)


H.S. talent show winner...


The fabulous - one and only (two and only)... Nicholas Brothers
Music ~ Glenn Miller ~ Big Band - "Chattanooga Choo Choo"
Slide & Glide



:>---

EGA
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  #5682  
Old 05-22-18, 01:00 PM
ohiopup ohiopup is offline
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For the youngsters....

Those hats they are wearing - they are called 'Boaters'
and those 'trims' over the shoes are - 'spats'

:>---

EGA
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  #5683  
Old 05-22-18, 01:56 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Spats. boaters, Paul Fix, Frank Overton and Givenchy - the usual eclectic references.

"I may not be much, Mr. Finch, but I'm still Sheriff of Maycomb County and Bob Ewell fell on his knife."

I have been an active movie goer for almost 60 years; think nothing of driving to Gateway in Columbus for movies that never get close to Wyandot County. Ditto that for my immediate family - children are big and critical movie attendees - To Kill A Mockingbird is a top five movies for all of us.
Also, it was the first movie I ever saw where I was very conscious on the score. Beyond great music.

Thirty plus years ago when school still made sense I taught a mini-course on the novel and TKAMB was one of the four books we read every year. Plus, I would also show the movie. My most reluctant students read the book and loved the movie. We also did Of Mice and Men; showed the movie with Robert Blake and Randy Quaid.
I loved teaching like this!

The other class that my reluctant students always ended up enjoying was Mythology. We used a very well known paperback by, I believe, her name was Edith Hamilton.

Whatever we were doing, we always decorated the cork boards (I had two) with clippings from my many magazines and just made up stuff about what the clips represented and they also discovered that there were literary references every where. Not because it was me, but don't you wish school was still like that today?!

My kiddos also wrote a lot; again using stories we found in Newsweek, Time, etc. Comp. a week, vocab. and spelling tests, etc.

I have referred to the boiler room at Hopewell-Loudon as the best spot I was ever at (same for the entire school, also) and how we would all be just cutting up/joking over/and at each other during the teachers' lunch times and I would smart off every once in awhile while grading compositions. Great times!!

Sorry - got on a run there.

Last edited by Bevo; 05-22-18 at 04:36 PM.
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  #5684  
Old 05-22-18, 02:59 PM
Diva Diva is offline
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Bevo- It's quite all right.

Thanks, ohiopup, for the video.
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  #5685  
Old 05-22-18, 03:06 PM
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I'm conscious of designers these days as our daughter and her husband recently bought a company called Kingdom and State from Tan France of "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy". He started it from the ground up but got too busy to continue, so he sold it to his friend. My daughter is the sole designer now. Her collection comes out this fall. They'll discontinue Tan's designs and clearance them out. It's very interesting learning the ins and outs of designing fabric, seeing swatches from the fabric manufacturer in China, the design process, and getting the clothes made and produced in many sizes.
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  #5686  
Old 05-22-18, 04:21 PM
ohiopup ohiopup is offline
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FWIW ...

Cleveland's Western Reserve Historical Society @ University Circle;
also near by The Cleveland Art Museum, Natural History Museum,
Severance Hall (home to the Cleveland Orchestra), and the Cleveland
Botanical Garden.


Western Reserve Historical Society contains...
The Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum lots of old cars a few planes and
the history (including trophies) of the National Air Races...


Fashion (i.e. the wedding garments referenced earlier)...
The Chisholm Halle Costume Wing, houses over 30,000 garments from the late 18th century to the present.

~ ~ ~

Kent State University offers a major in Fashion Design.

:>---

EGA

Last edited by ohiopup; 05-22-18 at 04:35 PM.
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  #5687  
Old 05-22-18, 05:11 PM
BlackHawk BlackHawk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post

...

The other class that my reluctant students always ended up enjoying was Mythology. We used a very well known paperback by, I believe, her name was Edith Hamilton.

...

Edith Hamilton's "Mythology" was a great choice to get kids introduced to mythology. When I was young (grade school-ish), I picked up my dad's old worn out copy and couldn't put it down. It was my first peek into the world of the Olympians, Titans and all the other gods, demi-gods, heroes, sirens, furies, nymphs, etc. I'm still fascinated to this day.

Ironically, I was just telling someone about this very book.
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  #5688  
Old 05-22-18, 05:30 PM
ohiopup ohiopup is offline
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Diva was a good teacher...makes school interesting...

Ulysses (1954 film) my previous post...

http://www.yappi.com/forums/showthre...es#post6986144

We have also mentioned Jason and the Argonauts (1963 film)

I saw a few of Steve Reeves Mythology films...
...Hercules (1958) / Hercules Unchained (1959) / The Trojan Horse (1961)

More recently: Clash of the Titans (both 1981 and 2010) and
The Odyssey (1997 TV miniseries with Armand Assante, as Odysseus)

Armand Assante (Odysseus) slays the suiters...

Short...


Long...


- - -




WIKI...
The book contains an introduction and seven sections:
1.Greek gods of Olympus and the Greek creation myths
2.Greek and Roman myths involving love and adventure, including the tales of Eros and Psyche and Jason's quest for the Golden Fleece
3.Heroes before the Trojan War, such as Perseus, Theseus, Heracles and Atalanta
4.Trojan War and its heroes, including Odysseus, Aeneas and Achilles
5.Significant families in Greek mythology: the house of Atreus, the royal house of Thebes, and the royal house of Athens
6.Lesser-known stories from Greek and Roman mythology
7.Tales from Norse myths involving deities such as Odin, Thor and Loki

Most editions include drawings by American illustrator Steele Savage.

A Steele Savage cover art...


:>---

EGA

Last edited by ohiopup; 05-22-18 at 05:48 PM.
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  #5689  
Old 05-22-18, 08:17 PM
Johnstown Benny Johnstown Benny is offline
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Doug McClure's show was "The Virginian", starring James Drury. I've watched it a few times on the FETV and INSP channels. I remember it being on prime time in the 1960's.

The Portsmouth OH post office had a stamp event around 2010, I believe to commemorate a TV/movie western stamp series. They invited James Drury, and also Edward Faulkner, who co-starred in a number of John Wayne flicks. I knew a couple of managers who drove down there and got pictures.

I wish I'd known, would like to have met Faulkner. I always enjoyed the characters he portrayed ("Honest, Mr. McLintock, we wasn't doing nothin'!"). I believe Faulkner grew up just across the river in Kentucky. I'm not sure what connection Drury had with Portsmouth, if any, but they were both walking around in their cowboy hats and pressing the flesh.
Roy Rogers had a Portsmouth connection as a youth. Although Roy was born in Cincinnati, he and his family moved to Portsmouth as a youth. Maybe this RR connection had something to do with the Portsmouth event ??

TV western fans, myself included, are saddened to learn of the death of Clint Walker, Cheyenne Bodie today. He was part of that great Warner Brothers trilogy on Tuesday nights back in the 50's and early 60's along with Sugarfoot ( Will Hutchins) and Bronco ( Ty Hardin).

JB
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  #5690  
Old 05-22-18, 10:47 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Remember those westerns very well. I liked them all but I was especially fond of The Rifleman (got the "saw-off plastic" rifle as a gift and it actually shot plastic bullets). I was messing around with it once and very accidentally hit a kid upside the head with the stock portion of the rifle. His dad drove his son (who had a microscopic cut on his ear) to our house and told my dad that I had shot his son in the head with my gun!

I also recall a show - not real well known, I believe - called the Texas Rangers that I liked a lot.

My dad went to bed no later than 9:00 year around because of early morning work. But on Friday and Saturday nights he stayed up for the 9:00 and 10:00 shows. During The Twilight Zone, Paladin and Gunsmoke dad would sit at one end of the couch and I would lie with my head at the other end, body covered by a light blanket. My mom sat in a chair nearby and there we were on countless weekend nights. I fell asleep there dozens of times as a young boy.

A very secure feeling that I am not sure I have felt since.

rip - Clint Walker
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  #5691  
Old 05-23-18, 05:24 AM
Diva Diva is offline
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It was Bevo who was a teacher, and sounds like a good one.

I liked Westerns when I was young, too. Gunsmoke, Bonanza, Stoney Burke (whom I saw at the Snake River Stampede in Nampa, ID. I love rodeos, as my grandparents took us every year when I was young. Grandpa always made us leave early to avoid the traffic, so we left during the bull rides. Every time.
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  #5692  
Old 05-23-18, 07:18 AM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Thank you, Diva. It was a different time, for sure. One more book for my novels' class back then was Gatsby - understood by many young people back in the day. A classic American story of yearning and striving with a dollop of debauchery thrown in

Thank you, also, Diva for allowing me to use this phrase around the house last night: "Who are you wearing tonight?" Memorable, as it will probably not be used again! Good luck to your kiddo and her husband in their undertaking.

Go Cavs!
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  #5693  
Old 05-23-18, 08:07 AM
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Mr. Slippery Mr. Slippery is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackHawk View Post
Edith Hamilton's "Mythology" was a great choice to get kids introduced to mythology. When I was young (grade school-ish), I picked up my dad's old worn out copy and couldn't put it down. It was my first peek into the world of the Olympians, Titans and all the other gods, demi-gods, heroes, sirens, furies, nymphs, etc. I'm still fascinated to this day.

Ironically, I was just telling someone about this very book.
I had to read that book my freshman year of HS. They handed the book out to us in early spring, told us what date it had to be read by, and we were responsible for reading it and taking notes. We were allowed to use the notes on the test over the book's material, so it was to our advantage to do a good job on the notes.

That book was a pain in the butt (I'm not big on that mythology stuff), but it's an important read for anyone because of the countless number of mythological references that are present both in the arts & literature (music, movies, etc) and in everyday life (corporate names and logos, etc.)
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  #5694  
Old 05-23-18, 08:13 AM
Diva Diva is offline
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I've had that particular mythology book in my personal library for decades and never read it. I should.
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  #5695  
Old 05-23-18, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
Thank you, Diva. It was a different time, for sure. One more book for my novels' class back then was Gatsby - understood by many young people back in the day. A classic American story of yearning and striving with a dollop of debauchery thrown in

Thank you, also, Diva for allowing me to use this phrase around the house last night: "Who are you wearing tonight?" Memorable, as it will probably not be used again! Good luck to your kiddo and her husband in their undertaking.

Go Cavs!
IIRC, I had to read the following books during my sophomore HS English class (American Literature):

- Of Mice and Men
- The Grapes of Wrath (My favorite, I love Steinbeck's simple writing style)
- The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
- The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Not a big Mark Twain fan)
- For Whom the Bell Tolls (I hate Hemingway)
- The Old Man and the Sea (elective)
- Death of Salesman
- The Crucible
- A Separate Peace
- The Scarlet Letter (I always tell the kids at my school that it's the hardest book they will read in HS due to Hawthorne's constant use of run-on sentences)
- The Catcher in the Rye
- Franny and Zoey (elective)
- The Great Gatsby
- Black Boy
- White Fang (elective)
- My Name is Asher Lev (elective, I liked both of Potok's books that I've read)

5 of these were assigned over the summer: Tom Sawyer, Separate Peace, Death of a Salesman, Mice and Men, and For Whom the Bell Tolls. There might have been one more book that we read during the school year, but I can't think what it would've been. Incidentally, To Kill a Mockingbird was assigned during freshman English.
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  #5696  
Old 05-23-18, 08:44 AM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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That is an impressive and ambitious list! I will admit to reading less than half of those listed.

I was also fortunate enough to teach anthology classes on Horror, Sci. Fi., Old West, Sports' Lit. (The Call Me Coach and Foul), Creative Writing and a whole host of teen-type books; my favorite at that time being Paul Zindel.

Several mentions of the Edith Hamilton book. Again, I will admit I had never read these great short, Greek stories prior to teaching the class! I really enjoyed them and like Mr. Slippery said, reading mythology has the added benefit of revealing the countless times mythological references are made in life. I still have the Hamilton book.

I was not a Twain fan either. I may try him again, though. ( I really liked the Cheapo Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer movies made in the late 50's - early 60's.) I do like Twain's pithy sayings. I always fancied myself floating on my humongous raft down the Sandusky River. Also, being lost in the cave with my Becky Thatcher or viewing my own funeral has a certain chivalrous and quirky feel.

Death of A Salesman is so raw that I believe we all see bits of ourselves in Willy Loman (low man). It's actually hard to watch, I believe.
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  #5697  
Old 05-23-18, 09:10 AM
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That is an impressive and ambitious list! I will admit to reading less than half of those listed.

I was also fortunate enough to teach anthology classes on Horror, Sci. Fi., Old West, Sports' Lit. (The Call Me Coach and Foul), Creative Writing and a whole host of teen-type books; my favorite at that time being Paul Zindel.

Several mentions of the Edith Hamilton book. Again, I will admit I had never read these great short, Greek stories prior to teaching the class! I really enjoyed them and like Mr. Slippery said, reading mythology has the added benefit of revealing the countless times mythological references are made in life. I still have the Hamilton book.

I was not a Twain fan either. I may try him again, though. ( I really liked the Cheapo Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer movies made in the late 50's - early 60's.) I do like Twain's pithy sayings. I always fancied myself floating on my humongous raft down the Sandusky River. Also, being lost in the cave with my Becky Thatcher or viewing my own funeral has a certain chivalrous and quirky feel.

Death of A Salesman is so raw that I believe we all see bits of ourselves in Willy Loman (low man). It's actually hard to watch, I believe.
That list wasn't my doing. I was in the honors class, and the teacher worked us to death. All but the elective works were required. That class and the honors Brit Lit (I hate British Literature) and AP World Lit classes that would follow ruined reading for me as a future hobby. We had to analyze every detail of the books, so it was far from entertaining. In AP, we read a book every other week and had to write a paper on each of them. I doubt I can remember everything we read that year. In the odd weeks, we would have to write papers about a poem or a short story that we analyzed during that week. I should not have taken that class given how little I liked to read by that point in my life.

I still read a book every now and then, but I really have to be in the mood to do it. I find I'm most into historical fiction and biographies.
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  #5698  
Old 05-23-18, 09:32 AM
Zunardo Zunardo is offline
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IIRC, I had to read the following books during my sophomore HS English class (American Literature):
For as much as I like to read, I haven't read 75% of these books, and they weren't required reading in our HS in the 1970's.

I only read Tom Sawyer because my parents bought it for me in grade school, and even then I never got past the fence whitewashing story until middle school.

Death Of A Salesman - I thought it was a murder mystery, was greatly disappointed. But I was able to answer questions on it for two consecutive ears on the In The Know TV quiz show

Read 1984- I thought it was a sci-fi book (see Salesman, Death of).

I remember seeing some Chaim Potok and Ayn Rand books in our high school library. I did check out Asher Lev and Atlas Shrugged, but had zero idea of what was going on, so I never finished them.

I remember reading Sinclair Lewis' "Babbitt" in high school. I have no idea why, but it also helped me during my In The Know appearances.

In my intellectual defense, I did read pretty much the entire Freddy The Pig series back then.
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  #5699  
Old 05-23-18, 10:04 AM
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Mr. Slippery Mr. Slippery is offline
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For as much as I like to read, I haven't read 75% of these books, and they weren't required reading in our HS in the 1970's.

I only read Tom Sawyer because my parents bought it for me in grade school, and even then I never got past the fence whitewashing story until middle school.

Death Of A Salesman - I thought it was a murder mystery, was greatly disappointed. But I was able to answer questions on it for two consecutive ears on the In The Know TV quiz show

Read 1984- I thought it was a sci-fi book (see Salesman, Death of).

I remember seeing some Chaim Potok and Ayn Rand books in our high school library. I did check out Asher Lev and Atlas Shrugged, but had zero idea of what was going on, so I never finished them.

I remember reading Sinclair Lewis' "Babbitt" in high school. I have no idea why, but it also helped me during my In The Know appearances.

In my intellectual defense, I did read pretty much the entire Freddy The Pig series back then.
I read Freddy and the Men from Mars. Don't remember a thing about it.

Asher Lev was about a Jewish boy who has an artistic talent and who aspires to pursue it which strains his relationship with his father who wants him to have a more traditional Jewish education (i.e. study the Torah). I also read Potok's The Chosen which is about 2 Jewish boys with markedly different upbringings who become friends. Potok's books are pretty easy to read.

Death of a Salesman is horribly depressing but is probably an accurate portrayal of how life is/was in a lot of households.

Couldn't stand Tom Sawyer. What a manipulative little twit! Huck Finn is a difficult read because I don't speak hillbilly.

Read 1984 as a Brit. Lit elective. I think it's required now at my school along with some other crap I didn't have to read. He hated almost all female authors. I prefer Animal Farm. Read Brave New World as well. No thanks. Brit. Lit does nothing for me. My Brit Lit class was upended because the regular teacher went on maternity leave for most of the 2nd semester, and her replacement who had taught English for many years before just did whatever he wanted. I have no clue what we were supposed to have been reading. In addition to 1984 and Brave New World, we read Lord of the Flies, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, MacBeth, The Merchant of Venice, Pride and Prejudice, and A Tale of Two Cities. Other Shakespeare works and Catch-22 were part of World Lit senior year.
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Old 05-23-18, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Slippery View Post
That list wasn't my doing. I was in the honors class, and the teacher worked us to death. All but the elective works were required. That class and the honors Brit Lit (I hate British Literature) and AP World Lit classes that would follow ruined reading for me as a future hobby. We had to analyze every detail of the books, so it was far from entertaining. In AP, we read a book every other week and had to write a paper on each of them. I doubt I can remember everything we read that year. In the odd weeks, we would have to write papers about a poem or a short story that we analyzed during that week. I should not have taken that class given how little I liked to read by that point in my life.
After watching my kid have to write about 75 papers in AP Lang and Comp and then end up with a hatred for writing, I totally get what you're saying about those AP courses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Slippery View Post
IIRC, I had to read the following books during my sophomore HS English class (American Literature):

- Of Mice and Men
- The Grapes of Wrath (My favorite, I love Steinbeck's simple writing style)
- The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
- The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Not a big Mark Twain fan)
- For Whom the Bell Tolls (I hate Hemingway)
- The Old Man and the Sea (elective)
- Death of Salesman
- The Crucible
- A Separate Peace
- The Scarlet Letter (I always tell the kids at my school that it's the hardest book they will read in HS due to Hawthorne's constant use of run-on sentences)
- The Catcher in the Rye
- Franny and Zoey (elective)
- The Great Gatsby
- Black Boy
- White Fang (elective)
- My Name is Asher Lev (elective, I liked both of Potok's books that I've read)

5 of these were assigned over the summer: Tom Sawyer, Separate Peace, Death of a Salesman, Mice and Men, and For Whom the Bell Tolls. There might have been one more book that we read during the school year, but I can't think what it would've been. Incidentally, To Kill a Mockingbird was assigned during freshman English.
My kid also had the same eighth grade teacher as I did (who dispensed the same reading list for more than 35 years); so, I was able to find the eighth grade course syllabus (we keep everything).

Read 12 of the books in class and 6 independently (some required parental consent):

1. Animal Farm
2. A Christmas Carol
3. The Hiding Place
4. Lupita Maņana
5. 1984
6. Of Mice and Men
7. A Separate Peace
8. The Old Man and the Sea
9. The Red Badge of Courage
10. Summer of My German Soldier
11. Treasure Island
12. The Diary of a Young Girl
13. The Gift of the Magi
14. Night
15. To Be a Slave
16. The Screwtape Letters
17. Gold in the Garden
18. Fahrenheit 451
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