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  #4051  
Old 11-11-17, 07:42 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Zunardo - We haven't gotten the Fox tv - affiliate for over seven weeks. All of their advice as to what to do is geared toward Toledo. It sucks big time!

I have a tv guy coming soon to re -attach my antennae. Sad...I actually get less "local" stations now than I did in 1969. My first cable bill was around $8; when they added HBO (Home Body Odor) it went to $22 or so.

Back in the Continental Cablevision days, we received three Columbus stations, three Toledo stations, A Lima station, two out of Cleveland, HBO and Cinemax.

Now, we don't get any Cleveland or Columbus stations - no Lima , even though it's less than 50 miles from here. We get three - no check that - TWO - Toledo stations because of the current fight.

Of course, we get the NASA station, five or six stations that sell knives and other things, 4-5 religious stations, two weather stations (that's important).

I watched the game today in Tiffin at Grandma's on her Fox Station out of Detroit. It's not a bad trade off - she wants a home style chicken sandwich from Wendy's with fries and during any commercials and the half time, we have to watch "Cats From Hell"!!

To ease my angst tonight I recommend Matchbox Twenty's "3:00 a.m." and "Real World". Get out the bag of cheese balls and enjoy these cheesy 80's videos, with great hooks and music that sounds like its from from the late 60's. Love it!!!!!

Last edited by Bevo; 11-11-17 at 08:10 PM.
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  #4052  
Old 11-12-17, 05:00 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Since we are all nostalgic as can be, I'm sure a few of you noticed the recent inductees and nominees for The Toy Hall of Fame. The criteria is simple: must initiate creativity and span generations.

Over 60 toys have been inducted. I thought I would run through the list over a few posts and if anyone wants to jump in - great! If not, enjoy the journey... .

This year's runner ups included: 8 Ball , Matchbox Cars (can't believe these are not in), My Little Pony, Pez ( loved these!), Play Food, Risk, Sand, Transformers, and Uno.

Making the cut for acceptance into the hall:

1. The game CLUE (millions still sell every year; and there have been a variety of versions; invented by a British couple during W.W.II. Personally, I was not a big board game or card(s) player; Monopoly and Old Maid was about as far as I got. I had friends when we were in our early 20's who would play cards all night Sat. and well into Sunday afternoons. One of the frequent players was former NBA player, Joe Graboski, Sr. We have covered on The Huddle that Joe, Sr. played 12 years - all of the 50's - was on an NBA championship team and played with Wilt. Anyway, just wasn't my thing.

2. Drum roll, please........The PAPER AIRPLANE!..I was totally lacking in any sort of mechanical ability but even I could make these marvels. Credited with creating the first one is that "jack of all trades", Leonard Da Vinci. These were always good for a few minutes of play or for getting rid of a poor math paper.

And, The WIFFEL BALL. Invented by a dad (who else?) who after his son got a little big for the back yard - what with broken windows and lost balls, etc. began working on some discarded plastic scrap from a factory, eventually finding and creating a fairly uniform sphere. He then tried different configurations of holes, eventually settling on eight. Of course, this makes the ball slow down , and fly all over the place. The name onviously comes from a swing and a "wiff".

At the age of 13-15 I actually played in a neighborhood Wiffle ball league. We kept stats and fought like crazy but we always played. Oh yes, it was a stone lot. Our "Green Monster" was a big brown barn that set just right of center.
(Diva - this is the parking lot north of St. Petes.)

I throw out a few toys every once in awhile and please peruse the article as you wish. It was in last week's news. Feel free to participate as you desire. (Just keep your hands off my LITTLE GREEN ARMY MEN!)

Last edited by Bevo; 11-12-17 at 05:12 PM.
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  #4053  
Old 11-12-17, 05:26 PM
Zunardo Zunardo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
Zunardo - We haven't gotten the Fox tv - affiliate for over seven weeks. A
D'oh! And we just talked about that. Getting CRS Syndrome more frequently these days, it seems.

To be honest, I'm surprised to see an Ohio State game on Fox.
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  #4054  
Old 11-12-17, 05:46 PM
Diva Diva is offline
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I loved Barbies, Sparkle Paints, most board games, race car sets. There were eight of us, so we had almost every game/toy that was popular for girls. Seven girls, one boy (youngest).
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  #4055  
Old 11-12-17, 06:20 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Some of your favs are on the HOF list. I actually had a big old paste board box that served as my toy box.
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  #4056  
Old 11-12-17, 07:35 PM
BlackHawk BlackHawk is offline
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From my youth in the sixties: GI Joes, HO slot cars and track, Lincoln Logs, little green Army men, plastic dinosaur set, plastic cowboys and Indians set, comic books, Lionel train set, models (especially cars and WW2 fighter planes...no sniffing the glue!), a junior chemistry set, table tennis, board games (checkers, chess, Risk and Stratego were my favorites), baseball cards, etc.

Plus all the outdoor activities: 10-speed bike, Sears "El Tigre" mini-bike, Daisy BB gun, whiffle ball, badminton, kickball, driveway basketball, backyard football, sandlot baseball, playing catch, tree forts, firecrackers, kites, skateboarding, ghost-in-the-graveyard, etc.
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  #4057  
Old 11-12-17, 08:27 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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B.H. - I'm coming to your house! Many of those are on the H of F. list.

Of what you mentioned: I loved my dinosaurs, little army men, little cowboys and Indians. I use to lay near the heat register - I could see the tv from there - and with some string and clay I could get the clay nice and malleable and give those little men a rough time. I suppose a gas bill in winter back then was $10-$15. Our house was very toasty - like 80!

Had all of the comics; I mentioned recently one of my childhood friends has been a big time comic book impresario for decades.

My trains never amounted to much which was somewhat ironic since my dad worked on the r.r. for over 45 years. I use to salivate for those huge train sets with towns, mountains and moving parts all over the place, smoke stacks with real smoke!

I believe I mentioned that I sold hundreds of ball cards to the guy who ran that wiffle ball league for over a thousand dollars around 35 years ago. Probably worth 50 grand today. Maybe more.

Only new bike I ever had was a Schwin Flying Star; there was a Moore's Store in town and I bought several used bikes there over the years, along with that Flying Star. Guy who ran it was named Don Smith. It was right next to The Star Theater and so he got a lot of business from the kids back in the 60's going to the movies but he hated when they came in. He liked me for some reason.

I got one new basketball a year - at Easter. That seemed to be the cycle I was on. I loved a new pumped up $12 Wilson basketball almost more than anything - except a new fishing reel or a new transistor radio. I have mentioned in the past that I fished a lot - often alone with my thoughts. Boy, would I like to know what that sounded like when I was ten!

Skateboards hit Upper Sand. in the spring of '64; Jan and Dean, etc., et.al. We rode them on a large expanse of declining concrete at the Courthouse up town. I was actually pretty good at it (weren't we all pretty good divers, roller skaters, dribblers, etc) and then it got away from me one time -after we had being riding for a few weeks - and a semi on old route 30 creamed it. Funny, I was upset but too much and there was never another skateboard. That seemed to be how life was then - something else always came along, sandals, stripped shirts, mirror sunglasses, capri pants for boys called "beachcombers"...maybe a madras hat.

No wonder I had problems dating !

Last edited by Bevo; 11-12-17 at 09:57 PM.
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  #4058  
Old 11-12-17, 09:41 PM
Diva Diva is offline
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Jacks! I played them all the time. And roller skates.
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  #4059  
Old 11-13-17, 12:57 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Here are ten more toys from the H.of F.:

1. Alphabet Blocks (can you throw these?)
2. Atari Game System
3. Baby Doll
4. Barbie (My girl had a few and she and her brother palayed with the Barbie doll house and van all of the time.)
5. Any ball
6. Any type of bike, trike, etc.
7. Big Wheel (missed out of these; looked like a lot of fun)
8. The highly esteemed and regarded - Blanky
9. Any bubble concoction (I wish they would have had the really big ones; but even the small containers were fun on the stoop on a warm day.)
10. Candy Land (played this at my third grade girlfriend's house.)

Diva - being a transplant you probably did not know that Upper had a skating rink right across from Automated Petroleum in the 50's, into the early 60's.
Clinton and Rita Karg ran it with mostly Rita there. I was best friends with their son, Chuck all the way through school. Perhaps, you have heard of Karg's Supply (now it is Rall's, I believe). Clinton Karg built all of the houses in the North East corner of Upper. (You have probably heard someone say that they live in Karg's subdivision.) if you are ever up there, look for Clikar St. - Clinton Karg.
This was strictly Happy Days stuff as the Roller rink was open in the evenings and all of the j.high and high school kids hung out there. I recall vividly Chuck having a second grade birthday party there in 1960.
Changing times closed the rink in the early 60's. What was very cool was that the Kargs continued to have pop, candy, etc., delivered to their house for Chuck and all of his friends. He also had a couple of pinball machines in the basement. We eventually moved on from the sweet stuff to his dad's Rolling Rock beer.)

Last edited by Bevo; 11-13-17 at 01:09 PM.
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  #4060  
Old 11-13-17, 01:24 PM
Monclova Steve Monclova Steve is offline
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When I was 6 I saw a commercial for Rock 'em Sock 'em Robots. They looked SOOOOOO cool that -- for the 1st time in my entire (6 yr. old) life, I took it upon myself to send a money order along with the form I found in a magazine to the "Rock 'em Sock 'em Robots" company.
I waited. And waited. And waited. And the Rock 'em Sock 'em Robots never came.
To this day, if I had a set I would play with them. It would probably be fun. But......they never came.
Of course, it never bothered me at all.
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  #4061  
Old 11-13-17, 03:49 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Of course not. Someone stole your money - so much for "the good old days".
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  #4062  
Old 11-13-17, 06:55 PM
BlackHawk BlackHawk is offline
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A Mickey Mantle card was my biggest find in my sixties-era Topps baseball card collection. If I remember right, it was five cents for five cards and a piece of hard, stale bubblegum...most years there would be an extra bonus like a mini-poster in the pack. We collected football and basketball cards, too, but baseball cards were our main passion.

We had hundreds of comic books. A great rainy day activity. Most were priced at 12-cents, but some earlier comics were only a dime. Classics Illustrated went for 15-cents. We mostly had DC and Archie comics, but I remember reading Marvel comics at the barbershop. The barber would give us a piece of Bazooka gum after the haircut. Back in those days, we would ask for a "crew cut" or sometimes a "boys haircut". "Flat top" and "burr" were about the only other options.
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  #4063  
Old 11-13-17, 07:25 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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I had a Mantle card and a Maris card after their huge home run seasons. I was usually upset as I seemed to have 1oo Bennie Daniels' cards. He pitched for the Senators and lost around 20 every year.

I liked the cards with the little cartoon on the back and I also had quite a few pro football cards. I had one of linebacker/punter Yale Larry. He died recently and was 80.

I hung out at Hagemeir's barber shop (two brothers in their 60's and a third). Cokes were a nickle and I charged mine all of the time. I also had ads up for my night crawler business - "Big Dozens; proprietor in shop".
There was a newsstand just a few feet away and I would buy a Plain Dealer and a bag a chips, and sit in the chair next to the biog window in front. Charge my coke, buy some chips and read the paper.

I was a flat top guy and loved to put on the butch wax. The Monday before our county fair openned is called "Hagameir Day" because that was the only day the brothers would go - because it was still free on Monday!

By the time I hit 8th. grade I had started to grow my hair out a little (this was Upper, after all). I committed the cardinal sin of getting my hair cut at another shop for a dollop of style. The brothers found out and never spoke to me again and let me know that I was not welcome in their shop.

Mon- we still have one of those fighting toys in the basement.
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  #4064  
Old 11-14-17, 12:10 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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More from the Toy Hall of Fame:

11. Cardboard Box. (Remember the criteria is that the "toy" promotes creativity and that the "item" last several generations. Can't go wrong with a big old box. My kids had a tv box once and used it for all kinds of things.) Haven't we all?

I'll call this 11A for me. Right around when I was in the 6th. a bunch of us discovered pole vaulting. Most of us had high jump standards - built by us or our dads - but we needed a "plant" pole to attempt vaulting.

Thomas and Franz Carpet in Upper had all of their carpets wrapped around very heavy duty cane poles. Thus, those became our pole vault poles. I was terrible at this and it lasted about as long as my skate boarding. Whereas I straddled five feet or so, I had friends up around 7'-8'!!

12. Checkers - when I worked as a grade school counselor, checkers and coloring were my go to activities for "talking time" with a youngster.

13. Chess - I never had the patience to learn the game (just like with playing cards); I had many students, however, who were pretty good.

14. Crayola Crayons - nothing like that start of the year collection. Remember the double-deck box of 64. And, what an array! Oyster?! Ochre???

15. Doll Houses - come on guys, we all "played house" at some point. (Maybe it was "post office" we played.)

16. Dominoes - not me. I didn't even know there was a game involved with these. I thought the point was to line them up... .

17. Duncan Yo-Yo - another item that cycled back around to my group as fifth or sixth graders. Loved all of the different models and actually got pretty good at it.

18. Dungeons and Dragons - missed me. I was probably getting married (or divorced). (Actually, my own version of dungeons and dragons.)

19. Easy-Bake Oven - Everyone loved these and none of us could believe it worked.!

20. Erector Set - too metalic for me but I bet a lot of kids who became engineers had this toy.
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  #4065  
Old 11-14-17, 12:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
More from the Toy Hall of Fame:

11. Cardboard Box. (Remember the criteria is that the "toy" promotes creativity and that the "item" last several generations. Can't go wrong with a big old box. My kids had a tv box once and used it for all kinds of things.) Haven't we all?

I'll call this 11A for me. Right around when I was in the 6th. a bunch of us discovered pole vaulting. Most of us had high jump standards - built by us or our dads - but we needed a "plant" pole to attempt vaulting.

Thomas and Franz Carpet in Upper had all of their carpets wrapped around very heavy duty cane poles. Thus, those became our pole vault poles. I was terrible at this and it lasted about as long as my skate boarding. Whereas I straddled five feet or so, I had friends up around 7'-8'!!

12. Checkers - when I worked as a grade school counselor, checkers and coloring were my go to activities for "talking time" with a youngster.

13. Chess - I never had the patience to learn the game (just like with playing cards); I had many students, however, who were pretty good.

14. Crayola Crayons - nothing like that start of the year collection. Remember the double-deck box of 64. And, what an array! Oyster?! Ochre???

15. Doll Houses - come on guys, we all "played house" at some point. (Maybe it was "post office" we played.)

16. Dominoes - not me. I didn't even know there was a game involved with these. I thought the point was to line them up... .

17. Duncan Yo-Yo - another item that cycled back around to my group as fifth or sixth graders. Loved all of the different models and actually got pretty good at it.

18. Dungeons and Dragons - missed me. I was probably getting married (or divorced). (Actually, my own version of dungeons and dragons.)

19. Easy-Bake Oven - Everyone loved these and none of us could believe it worked.!

20. Erector Set - too metalic for me but I bet a lot of kids who became engineers had this toy.
Cardboard Box - Who hasn't played with one at some point in their childhood?

Checkers - Played but wasn't a big fan.

Chess - Know how to play but was really not a big fan. I play games to try and relax. Chess was anything but relaxing.

Clue - I hate that game, and we could never help but lose some of the tokens or weapons.

Crayola Crayons - My grandma had the big box of Crayolas. Best part was the built-in sharpener.

Doll House - I'm a guy, so no doll house for me. I played "house," but this toy refers to the smaller doll houses for Barbies and the like.

Dominoes - Same for me. Set 'em up and make them tumble. I never knew how to play the actual game until a few years ago.

Duncan Yo-Yos - I had yo-yos but no actual Duncan. I never learned any tricks. I had one that would light up when the yo-yo descended. My best one was a wooden L.L. Bean.

Dungeons and Dragons - Nope.

Easy Bake Oven - Way before my time.

Erector Set - My brother had an one, but I didn't get into it too much.

Of ones from this part of the alphabet not inducted: my brother and I each had chemistry sets at some point in our youth. It was cool to do something more advanced than mixing baking soda and vinegar.

Each of us also had one of those electronic circuit kits that has a circuit board with a bunch of numbered springs and a bunch of wires. The instruction book would tell you which numbered springs to connect with wires to create different light and sound effects.

I'll wait until toys further down the list are mentioned before commenting on them.
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  #4066  
Old 11-14-17, 01:45 PM
Monclova Steve Monclova Steve is offline
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What a relief, Bevo and Mr. Slippery. Here I thought that I was the only person in the world who didn't know how to play Dominoes. Other than the "fun" way (you know, set 'em up and then watch 'em fall), I still have no idea.
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  #4067  
Old 11-14-17, 01:56 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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One of my favorite visuals: some guy knocking down 100,000 of those things and spelling words, turning on lights, creating a waterfall, etc. Nutty, wild and great!
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  #4068  
Old 11-14-17, 02:01 PM
Monclova Steve Monclova Steve is offline
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Quote:
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One of my favorite visuals: some guy knocking down 100,000 of those things and spelling words, turning on lights, creating a waterfall, etc. Nutty, wild and great!
Now that's what I call HOF quality!
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  #4069  
Old 11-14-17, 08:04 PM
Diva Diva is offline
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I loved playing Monopoly and Sorry. Also, Queen of the Prom was a favorite. We also played school a lot. My parents bought us school desks, ten of them, from an old school. They were the old ones that connected to each other front to back. We had a big playroom that was our school room. I had a great childhood.
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  #4070  
Old 11-14-17, 08:26 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Monopoly fan here. A great memory for me occurred when I was about 9. My brother who is 16 years older than me and his wife were staying with us. My mom was seated on the couch and my dad in his easy chair. It was a Sunday night and it had to be Christmas break because no one was heading to bed. My brother was a telephone installer all over the Eastern part of the country. When they were within 50 miles of us, they stayed there and usually for a long time (6 mos. or more).

We played for several hours; mom popped corn, etc.

The other event that is similar to this was the Sunday that the Browns won the '64 championship. My dad never watched the games; always working at something. My brother would if around but that was seldom. For some reason, all three of us watched the entire game that day. The only time that ever happened.

Sometimes it all aligns and for a brief cosmic moment, all is right in your world.

Just like Diva, my childhood was great. Especially, 3 -17. I had great friends and lived in the world's best small town.: park, theater, pool, river, friends, etc.
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  #4071  
Old 11-15-17, 10:36 AM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Moving on through the Toy Hall of Fame to probably Ohio's most famous toy creation: 21. The Etch- A - Sketch from Ohio Art in Western Ohio. I believe O.A. sold out and the company is out of Ohio. I was not talented at this at all; some people create amazing pictures. But, I bet you always picked one up if you saw one around.

22. Fisher Price Little People (My soldiers and cowboys doing battle with the dinosaurs filled this for me.)

23. Frisbee - the original pie plate invention. Was the name of the bakery "Frisbee?" Amazing and simple invention. Sold tens of millions. We ahve a nationally recognized Frisbee golf girl in Upper.

24. G.I. Joe - missed my generation by probably ten years or so.

25. Game of Life. One of very few board games I had.

26. Hot Wheels - see G.I Joe - sure looked like a lot of fun, though!!

27. Hula Hoop - mine was blue and I was decent with the spins. There's a girl in Upper, named Rachel Mitten - who has videos on You Tube, etc. of her Hula Hoop skills. She is a star and is well known in gymnastic/hoop circles (pun intended).

28. Jack -in - the - Box - Had one; use to scare young children with it.

29. Jacks - Diva's fav. I paniced and slung everything all over the place trying to pick up.

30. Jig Saw Puzzles. Hated the 10,000 pieces' sets, etc.

31. Jump Rope - at recess before girls were allowed to do what they wanted, they owned jump rope and tether ball. Some of us saw what was up with the girlies and always included them in our games but it would be another 20 years before Title Nine. We weren't enlightened but we did like to make teams; if you could play, you were in.

31. Kites - Tried many - rarely succeeded. There was always some guy back at the East School playground in March or April with one soaring several hundred feet in the air. Part of my problem was the launch - didn't like all that running!

Chime in if you want.
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  #4072  
Old 11-15-17, 10:59 AM
Diva Diva is offline
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Jigsaw puzzles - My grandma introduced then to me as a small girl, and I love them to this day. When I go out west, I put them together with my grandkids because they love them now, too.
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  #4073  
Old 11-15-17, 11:45 AM
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21. The Etch- A - Sketch - had one but never got into it much. I'm no artist.

22. Fisher Price Little People - had a few of these growing up. The farm set was rather iconic, I thought.

23. Frisbee - "Frisbee's name is a spin-off from a defunct Connecticut bakery, Frisbie Pie Co." The toy was marketed by Wham-O. While they may not be throwing around an actual frisbee, many HS cross country teams play "Ultimate" after practices as a way to have fun. "Ultimate" is similar to football except there is no running after a pass is completed, and if a pass is incomplete, the defending team takes possession of the disc. I play disc golf somewhat regularly. It's a fun way to enjoy a walk in the park. We have a couple tournament caliber courses nearby in the Canton-Massillon area.

24. G.I. Joe - My parents never bought me any, but I bought my own at the store, or I bought them off of neighborhood kids who outgrew them and wanted some quick cash. I have no idea what happened to them.

25. Game of Life - I always like this one better than Monopoly. I would often use the board, wheel, and pieces to play a race game.

26. Hot Wheels - I called them matchbox cars and had a few of them.

27. Hula Hoop - This was way before my time.

28. Jack -in - the - Box - I probably had one but don't remember it.

29. Jacks - Way before my time. I likely had a set lying around but never played it.

30. Jig Saw Puzzles - I still love them. The bigger, the better.

31. Jump Rope - I never could do it due to my lack of athleticism.

32. Kites - Not my thing.

Ones in this alphabetical grouping that I remember:
Hit Stix - Admittedly not HoF worthy due to its youth, but a must have for all aspiring air drummers.


Jenga - I hated the game, but you could doctor it up by writing things on the individual blocks to make the game appeal to a more "mature" audience (i.e. "Drink for 3 seconds").

Darned near anything else Fisher-Price made; especially the rotary phone.

Flexible Flyer Sled - I would consider it a rather iconic toy for anyone who grew up in a snowy climate.

From yesterday's alphabetical grouping, I failed to mention Electric Football.

Last edited by Mr. Slippery; 11-17-17 at 04:24 PM.
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  #4074  
Old 11-15-17, 11:26 PM
Zunardo Zunardo is offline
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Some of the HOF toys I had:

Blanket - I had to laugh, but it's true. My baby-blue blanket from my crib became a Superman cape when I was 4. My mother cut out and sewed the iconic "S" logo on it, and I was good to go for an hour of running around, pretending I was flying, before coming in to watch the real thing on TV with George Reeves.

Puppet - I still have my Mr. Ed talking puppet from Christmas 1964, and the pull-string still works, the whole thing's in pretty good shape.

ViewMaster - ah, but how many of you had the Walt Disney Cartoon Theater model, where the reels sat in a projector that got hot from the bulb inside? It used special 2-D reels, so there were 14 different images on each reel, instead of 7 images times 2. And the box it came in doubled as an indoor theater screen, or turn it around to make it an outdoor drive-in screen. Best birthday gift of all time in 1963.

Rocking Horse - I had a big Prairie King my parents got me when I started walking. When we moved to our house, he stayed in the basement, and I would hop on him every day for a quick ride until the day he start touching the ground from my weight. He stayed there until my boys were born, and then he resided in my folks' living room, and my sons got to ride him as I did when they were baby-sat by their grandmother.

My mother passed a few years ago, the boys are in their 20's now, but every once in a while when I'm vising Dad, I head downstairs and spend a minute or two with old Prairie King. He's yellowed some with age, but his hair is still dark, his springs are still sturdy, he's never lost his good looks and he's ready for the next generation to hop on and gallop off to an adventure somewhere.
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  #4075  
Old 11-15-17, 11:56 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Zunardo - beautiful! You are a poet! Your last paragraph is very evocative.

I'll post the next list and jump back in on your great memories tomorrow.

33. Legos - I used these in my grade school guidance job all of the time. One of the great things about them was that I could just dump my kids used small sets into a big container and then let the students go crazy.

34. Lincoln Logs - I had a small set that would make something resembling a tiny shed. You would need to large pile to make anything decent; cost about as much as a full-size cabin. Also, I was a dunce when it came to spatial relationships.

35. Lionel Trains - had some small sets. Loved the large ones on the old-time local tv Christmas shows with mountains, little ponds, small towns, etc.

36. Little Green Army Men - ultimate creativity and the ultimate boy toy.

37. Marbles - never really got the idea that they were a game. I just thought they were cool. Seems like The Little Rascals played marbles in some of their episodes. They went along with those orange crate soap box cars.

38. Monopoly - loved it.

39. Mr. Potato Head - Another great toy. Recall how prominent it was in Toy Story (Don Rickles, of course). Reminds me of "Mouse Trap" - which I don't believe is on the list.

40. Nintendo Game Boy - my kids loved them. My experience with this kind of stuff began and ended with Pong.

41. Play Doh - liked it a lot. I had the Play Doh Fun Factory. Another toy that I used a lot at school with kiddos.

42. Cards - Never enjoyed games where I had to think much; always preferred moving around - darts, bean bag toss games, cranked up airplanes or helicopters that flew in the house, etc.

43. Puppets - use to study those puppet stage sets in the big Christmas toy catalogues - like Sears - but never got one. I was very partial to those ventriliquist dummies, also. I believe the Twilight Zone episode where the dummy and the human reversed identities was enough for me to put this idea real far away.

Last edited by Bevo; 11-16-17 at 08:15 AM.
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  #4076  
Old 11-16-17, 08:32 AM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Z- About that list... .

The blanky was fairly important. I guess Charles Schultz understood this implicitly.

You have a toy from '64 that still works! Amazing! You mention several items on here that are fifty years old that are still functional; better built, better care.

I also had a View Master and I was amazed at what it did! I had a drive - in theater like the one you describe, also. I remember going into my folks' bedroom and watching it.

"My mother passed a few years ago, the boys are in their 20's now, but every once in awhile when I am visiting dad, I head downstairs and spend a minute or two with old Prairie King. He's yellowed some with age, but his hair is still dark, his springs are still sturdy, but he's never lost his good looks and he's ready for the next generation to hop on and gallop off to an adventure somewhere."

Sounds like all of us a little bit...I don't know if it's possible to construct a better paragraph than this.

That should remind all of us that the best times are almost always with the ones who care about you and that you care about. We all need to embrace that at the table this Thursday.
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  #4077  
Old 11-16-17, 10:30 AM
ohiopup ohiopup is offline
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We had a Monoply game (I collect them)

Also an Easy Money game ~ similar to Monoply
- no deeds; each player had a different colored movement pawn and the houses were
- color coded also to match the pawns (how ownership of the property was indicated)
- other than that it was pretty much Monoply in sheep's clothing

Here's a tale on the Game of Life. My Dad knew Reuben Klamer (classmates at
Canton McKinley), he brought a test version of the game to our house and we played it
for about a week and then gave him a report on what we thought of the game.

- - - - -

Best 'money' game ever (IMO) is Acquire





This was a compact 'Bookshelf' game
played on a 9x12 grid with matching tiles
Never played a game that lasted more than 45 minutes sometimes as short as 15 minutes.
At the end everything converts back to cash... the player with the most $$$$$ ~ WINS.

...RULES...
https://www.hasbro.com/common/instru...MonarchAH).PDF

New this game sells for around $35 (you can find it on ebay)

If you frequent garage sales / flea markets / thrift stores...I've seen them for as
little as $2.

First issued by 3-M (yes; the tape people - later sold to Avalon Hill). They had an entire
seies of 'Bookshelf games'...

=> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3M_boo...#List_of_games

:>---

Have fun!
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  #4078  
Old 11-16-17, 12:09 PM
Bevo Bevo is offline
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Ohio Pup - great info. and beyond in depth. Are you saying that you played the prototype of the game of Life?
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  #4079  
Old 11-16-17, 02:07 PM
ohiopup ohiopup is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
Ohio Pup - great info. and beyond in depth. Are you saying that you played the prototype of the game of Life?
Yes...

The prototype did not have the 3-D features on the board and the spinning wheel was separate.

:>---

Boy can I tell you stories... more later

EGA
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  #4080  
Old 11-16-17, 02:17 PM
Mr. Slippery's Avatar
Mr. Slippery Mr. Slippery is offline
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33. Legos - The main toy of my childhood. Could never get enough of them even though they were expensive. Parents still have them in the event that any grandkids ever come into existence and come to their house to play.

34. Lincoln Logs - I had a few but not many.

35. Lionel Trains - I had an O scale set. That's one of the medium sized scale. Only downside was the tracks had 3 rails. HO scale was smaller and more aesthetically pleasing to me.

36. Little Green Army Men - I had a few of them. 1 of my childhood friends who was all about the military (died in Iraq in '05, RIP) had a sandbox where we could create some epic battlefields. There was a video game franchise called "Army Men" where these guys came closer to life.

37. Marbles - Had some but never played the actual game with them.

38. Monopoly - The game everyone loves to hate. My older set was missing some tokens, so I got a newer set for Christmas in junior high which had the classic 10 tokens.

39. Mr. Potato Head - I never had one. I gave one to my cousin's daughter for a birthday.

40. Nintendo Game Boy - My folks would never let me have a video game system.

41. Play Doh - Don't recall having much of this as a kid until my mom found a recipe to make it ourselves.

42. Playing Cards - When all else fails, there's always solitaire.

43. Puppets - Only puppets I had were a raccoon (from the local wilderness center), Shamu (from Sea World), and McGruff the Crime Dog.

Ones that I'm surprised didn't make this alphabetical grouping:
Lite Brite - I had one of these but mistreated it as a youngster.


NES - The original Nintendo console.

Nerf anything - I know any ball is mentioned earlier in the list, but Nerf's line of products were what we usually used at recess. Their Turbo footballs were especially awesome because of their smaller size and more aerodynamic groove pattern which made it easier to "bomb" them for that last second Hail Mary when the bell rang at the end of recess.

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