Thread: Breaking Bad
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Old 02-14-17, 05:13 PM
TroyTrojan05 TroyTrojan05 is offline
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Originally Posted by tallmadge H2 dad View Post
Can you give me a brief overview of Justified and Blacklist?
Justified is the better of the two for sure. Blacklist isn't for everyone but I love it. Takes some time to get into it. Two links below are the trailers for the two shows.

From Wikipedia- Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens is something of a 19th-century–style, Old West lawman living in modern times, whose unconventional enforcement of justice makes him a target of criminals and a problem child to his U.S. Marshals Service superior. In response to his controversial but "justified" quick-draw shooting of mob hitman Tommy Bucks in Miami, Givens is reassigned to Lexington, Kentucky. The Lexington Marshals office's jurisdiction includes Harlan County, where Raylan was raised and which he thought he had escaped for good in his youth.




From Wikipedia-Raymond "Red" Reddington, a former US Naval Intelligence officer who had disappeared twenty years earlier to become one of the FBI's Ten Most Wanted Fugitives, surrenders himself to FBI Assistant Director Harold Cooper at the J. Edgar Hoover Building in Washington, D.C. Taken to an FBI "black site," Reddington claims he wishes to help the FBI track down and apprehend the criminals and terrorists he spent the last twenty years associating with; individuals that are so dangerous and devious that the United States government is unaware of their very existence.

He offers Cooper his knowledge and assistance on two conditions: immunity from prosecution, and that he wants to work exclusively with Elizabeth Keen, a rookie profiler newly assigned to Cooper. Keen and Cooper are suspicious of Reddington's interest in her, but he will only say that she is "very special." After Cooper tests Reddington's offer in locating and killing a terrorist in the first episode, Reddington reveals that this man was only the first on his "blacklist" of global criminals, which he has compiled over his criminal career, and states that he and the FBI have a mutual interest in eliminating them. The mysteries of Reddington's and Liz's lives, and his interest in her, are gradually revealed as the series progresses. Each episode features one of the global criminals, Reddington assisting the team tracking and apprehending them.

One of the ongoing themes of the series is that we see the effects that working with Reddington seemingly has on the characters of the FBI task force, as some of them start to compromise their own professional integrity, and do expedient or unprofessional things that they would never have considered at the outset of the series.

The rank of the featured criminal on the list is displayed at the start of every episode. The only exception to this rule is the sixty-third episode of the series, titled "Cape May."

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